Most tacos come in a corn tortilla, but these paleo tacos are wrapped in a crisp lettuce leaf. Serve them as an easily packed lunch “sandwich” or as cocktail hour finger food. A 3-ounce serving of skirt steak provides almost half a milligram of vitamin B6, nearly 40 percent of your daily need. People with poor kidney function or with malabsorption conditions like celiac disease especially need to be sure they’re getting enough B6.
"Paleo Home Cooking" caters to gluten-free newbies and veterans alike. Author Sonia Lacasse clearly lays out which foods you'll target, which you may occasionally indulge in and which you must "absolutely, positively stay away from." Among its 150 delectable recipes are homemade nut butters, naturally sweetened desserts, salads to last all week and scrumptious seafood and meat dishes, such as Hearty Meatballs in Wild Mushroom Sauce or Paleo Moussaka with creamy eggplant, spicy lamb and béchamel sauce.
Calamari is definitely something our ancestors would have eaten if they lived near a shore. Knowing how to catch fish and other sea creatures is what helped us beat out the Neanderthals, so we’ve known a thing or two about seafood for a long time now. This recipe walks you through the steps needed to take calamari and turn it into a delicious salad that works as a starter to a meal, or as a light meal all by itself. If you’re not used to eating things like squid you may have to broaden your palate and try new foods. It’s what Paleo is all about.

What sort of stuff is in the book? This book is centered around the 100+ amazing recipes I’ve developed for you. It’s got seven fueling strategies (when training falls at different times during the day), and fifty meal combinations (think of it like the beginnings of a meal plan). The macros for each recipe are provided. This book discusses performance nutrition in a limited manner, so if you’re after the detailed rationale behind why Paleo is awesome for athletes, I recommend also picking up my ebook, The Paleo Athlete.
Just because it comes from a can doesn’t mean that you can’t prepare something really delicious out of canned salmon. After all, we are fortunate enough that farmed salmon doesn’t hold well to the canning process so we are blessed with an easy and cheap source of wild salmon year-round. In this recipe, I use olive oil and lemon juice, but homemade mayonnaise is also excellent.
Cookie bars are like cookies, but they’re thicker and have more of the good stuff per square inch because of their size and shape. That means you’re getting the cookie experience you’re craving, but in a handy bar form that will leave you more satisfied. These bars are in the style of chocolate chip, quite possibly the most popular cookie choice in America. The only thing is you won’t want to dunk these in a glass of cow’s milk, but you can feel free to have almond milk with them, and they actually contain almond milk as well.
You can still enjoy all the taste of a juicy, veggie-topped burger without any of the excess calories due to a thick bun or heavy mayo-based sauce. This paleo salad features a hearty burger patty, fresh lettuce and tomatoes, and an herb-y vinaigrette to drizzle atop. We love the richness that a little ground lamb offers, but you can use all beef or even ground turkey instead.
However, what sets this book apart is its deep dive into the health benefits of paleo eating. There are meal plans specifically designed to address health problems like hormone imbalances or adrenal problems, as well as in-depth explanations of how food can impact your health. Some reviewers say the health information can get a little confusing, but most agree that it’s extremely helpful for understanding the benefits of paleo eating.

The cooking methods, the kitchen equipment and the food culture in the illustrations are also based on archaeological finds. Even the clothes and the clay jars are finds from settlements or graves. The glass in the woman’s hand, for example, was found at an excavation site in Sweden. (Illustration: Communicating Culture & Atelier bunterhund Zürich)
The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.
I don't know about you, but I rely on blogs and cookbooks for advice when I'm trying to cook healthier—in fact, this recipe a friend sent me for a Paleo breakfast casserole basically got me through my Whole 30 (I never even got sick of it). Having meal inspo at the ready is key to sticking to your goals, and we just so happen to have found the best Paleo cookbooks out there. In case you aren't familiar with the Paleo diet, people associate it with eating like a caveman—you basically consume a lot of protein, fresh veggies, and good fat while saying goodbye to processed foods and most sugars.
This stew is made from a bunch of beef, some blueberries, carrots, and an onion. It may sound like a bit of an odd mix, but trust us, it works. A stew is the perfect platform to construct a great Paleo meal, and here there’s plenty of healthy foods being combined. You’ll get plenty of protein from all of that beef, as well as important minerals like iron. Blueberries consistently make the news because of their antioxidant value, and carrots have long been known to be healthy due to the beta Carotene they contain. Onions also add to the nutritional value of this meal, and it will definitely keep you satisfied for several hours.
I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.
Perhaps you know this by the French name mille-feuille, but it also goes by Napoleon. Following a traditional mille-feuille recipe will get you into trouble on Paleo because of all the puff pastry and pastry cream that is used. Here they’ve made a faux version, and they’ve made it Paleo friendly so you won’t have to feel bad about eating it. The puff pastry has been replaced with almond flour, so no concerns about wheat or grains, and the filling is made with no dairy, using only ingredients commonly found in Paleo cooking and baking recipes.
This cod gets dusted with ginger powder, as well as salt and pepper to keep things very simple, but very delicious. As you see it’s served next to a salad made from zucchini which has been spiralized into ribbons, and gets steamed to keep it very healthy. The whole lot is then covered with a blend of vinegar, soy sauce, honey, and sesame oil, so it’s not too dry and is full of flavor. The cod and zucchini go together very well, making this a light meal you can use as a lunch, or dinner.

Bring pizza back on the menu with this recipe that could win an award. It’s made with rhubarb, which if you’re like us you didn’t know much about it before going Paleo. But it’s a very useful item to have around, and it’s used in plenty of recipes. Here they’ve paired it with chipotle powder so you’re going to get a pizza topped with ingredients you probably wouldn’t have considered before. They use goat cheese, which helps to avoid the use of cheese made from cow’s milk, and this is something you may or may not be able to digest well, so use your own judgement on it.


This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.
I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.
Now, you never have to worry about becoming bored with your meal planning again.  This book awakens new ideas on how to cook naturally, with raw, organic ingredients.  If you’re just starting out on this journey you’ll be amazed at the many delicious meals and snacks provided here, within these pages.  If you want an abundance of quick and easy recipes, and all of them to be good for you then this is a great recipe book.
Even though these have been dubbed “finger lickin’” Colonel Sanders has nothing to do with these. That’s because they’re not made with chicken, but with beef. They pack a bit of a kick because of the chipotles used, but not so much that it overpowers the other ingredients. There are plenty of Paleo ingredients used, both in the meatballs, and in the sauce. You’ll find tasty items like coriander seed, garlic, paprika, and bay leaves. You’ll find that the Paleo diet is not very restrictive, it’s just a matter of finding the right mix of spices and seasonings to make the food taste as good as it can.
This dish shows you how to cook up a simple, yet delicious Paleo stir fry that has only a few main ingredients, but is not short on flavor. It has bell peppers, chicken, some soy sauce, chili powder, and is fried up in coconut oil, so while it may seem like a basic recipe, it actually is full of flavor. This makes a great meal to cook up whenever you need a quick dinner, or lunch and want to keep things light. It is easily adaptable as well, you can use any vegetables you happen to have on hand in order to complete it or build on it.

What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.

At its most basic, Paleo meal construction is in itself very simple. Simply fry, bake, stew or poach a nice piece of good quality meat, fish or seafood and then steam, bake or boil a side of fresh or frozen vegetables, making sure to add a good amount of tallow, butter, Ghee, lard, coconut oil or olive oil in the process for taste, energy and health. The process is similar for making delicious stews or omelets: choose your source of protein and your favorite vegetables and cook them in a fresh stock in the case of a stew or with eggs in the case of an omelet. Of course, on top of all this, onions are almost always welcome, as are fresh and dried spices. As you get used to playing more and more with the different flavors available to you, you’ll create amazing dishes without even thinking about it.
This is the worst cook book I have ever bought. Every recipe I have tried so far has had errors. It will either give a list of ingredients and then fail to tell you what to do with one of them or like the one i am cooking right now...it tells you to roast the chicken at 475 for 25 minutes and then reduce the temperature and continue to cook 45 minutes....ummmm what temp should a person reduce it to? Good thing I consider myself a good cook and know what a whole chicken bakes nicely at. But for some people this could be really frustrating and it is for me when I am in a hurry to make a meal for my family. Buyer beware. Im sure there are better Paleo cookbooks out there.
×