These stuffed peppers are using sweet peppers so they are not spicy, and they are stuffed with goat cheese, which does not contain as much lactose as cheese made from cow’s milk. They say that you can use a different cheese if you do not like goat cheese, and with the cheese question you’re going to have to come up with your own answer as to which kind you are going to use while you are eating Paleo. If your body responds well to eating cheese, you’ll be able to have it more often than someone that can’t process it.
Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.

Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.
A key selling point of The Healing Kitchen is that it goes beyond the basic paleo diet. Instead, the authors also focus on providing information and inspiration about cooking for people with a chronic illness or autoimmune diseases. This approach is powerful for anybody who focuses on food as medicine, especially as the meals we eat can play a large role in our health.
Those who have been on the Paleo diet also say that once all the refined sugar and dairy are cut from the diet—about two to three months in—their level of energy is noticeably higher than before, so they’re even more motivated to work out and follow a Paleo diet, all part of the lifestyle. The key to success is to start small and build on your success.
The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.
In order to keep salads interesting you need to have an array of different ways to make them. In this grilled chicken salad recipe you’re starting with a basic chicken salad, but adding in items like raspberries, walnuts, and artichoke hearts to jazz things up and make it a meal that you look forward to time and time again. Top it with a basic balsamic vinaigrette or your favorite Paleo dressing and you’ve got a winner on your hands.
These burgers are inspired by Thanksgiving dinner. They’re made from turkey instead of beef or chicken, and are served with a cranberry aioli to invoke memories of cranberry sauce that’s served with the Thanksgiving turkey. But the most interesting thing about this recipe is the sweet potato buns made from fresh sweet potatoes instead of going without a bun. You don’t have to wait around until the holidays to enjoy the flavors you love.
This sweet potato is stuffed with beef and blueberries, a combination that you may not have ever seen before. They all combine to form a very well-balanced Paleo meal, and you’re getting tons of antioxidants both from the blueberries and the sweet potatoes. The beef gives you protein, while sweet potatoes are a carbohydrate that is digested slowly by the body. There is just as much sweet potatoes as there is beef, with just a bit of blueberries added for good measure. This makes for a microcosm of what it’s like to eat a perfectly portioned Paleo meal.

The recipes themselves cover many different types of dishes, including breakfast, drinks, snacks, desserts and, of course, main meals. With around 100 recipes in total, there is not a large number of recipes in any given category but that scarcely matters. Instead, the book acts as a great source of paleo recipes, regardless of your preferences for food.


They are snippets of my life and family. They show how I live as someone who eats and lives a primarily Paleo diet and lifestyle. It's real. I don't have the energy nor desire to dress these up and make them fake. You'll see me without makeup (some days), my kitchen messy, me eating stuff I shouldn't. You'll also see me give you tips on making things easier, things I like, and ideas for what to eat or do. And some days they won't have a darn thing to do with Paleo, health, or wellness – it'll just be me and my life.

Say hello to paleo and goodbye to stuffed sandwiches, right? Not so fast. Here’s an Italian roll-up with everything you love about a footlong. Vary the amount of greens in the middle of the roll as much as you like — the more you use, the more fiber. Substitute traditional mayo for the paleo-friendly version included in this recipe, or try pesto or hummus.

According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.
Chicken parmesan is not something that you would typically be having on Paleo because it is coated in bread crumbs. But this chicken parm is coated with Parmesan cheese and almond flour, which replaces the bread crumbs. You’ll still get that classic crunchy outer covering on the chicken, and of course the Parmesan will be baked right onto the chicken, so it’s just a matter of getting the other ingredients right. For the tomato sauce they are using garlic, oregano, and olive oil, and you can top it off with basil leaves and optional mozzarella cheese.
In many ways, the most interesting thing about this cookbook isn’t the recipes but the other information that is provided. With this cookbook, the authors strongly focus helping people to transition to the paleo diet and then stick with it in the long-term. This type of information can be particularly useful because the paleo diet is often overwhelming, especially when people first get involved.
This book features over 100 different Paleo recipes and if you don’t like a stuffy cookbook, this is the one to go with. It has a humorous style that will keep you smiling while you cook, and makes the process that much more fun. There is a whopping 288 pages for you to explore, so chances are you won’t be short on recipes for any type of meal you’d want to cook up. If you’ve ever wondered how to make your Paleo meals taste as good as possible, or how to maximize the effectiveness of the time you spend in the kitchen, you’ll be happy with the tips, tricks, and ideology of this Paleo chef.
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