These burgers are inspired by Thanksgiving dinner. They’re made from turkey instead of beef or chicken, and are served with a cranberry aioli to invoke memories of cranberry sauce that’s served with the Thanksgiving turkey. But the most interesting thing about this recipe is the sweet potato buns made from fresh sweet potatoes instead of going without a bun. You don’t have to wait around until the holidays to enjoy the flavors you love.
This Japanese beef dish uses bamboo as one of the vegetables. Trying new things is part of the Paleo process, and if you’ve never had bamboo shoots now is a good time to start. They are full of potassium and vitamins and taste good, especially with beef. There are also other vegetables like green beans and spinach to balance out the beef, and his preparation is easy to follow so you can make this just like he did. You can usually find bamboo shoots in the International section of a grocery store, of you may need to visit an Asian food mart.
We get it. Being a mom is full-on and full-time. Equal parts FUN and WTF. Our kids don’t come with instructions, and it’s ok if we don’t have all the answers. We’ll figure it out together. The best advice comes from our favorite experts and doctors, trusted mom friends, and learning on the job. Get your coffee — or wine! — and tune in to hear us spill it all. We got this. This is MOM BRAIN with Hilaria Baldwin and Daphne Oz.
Regardless of the origin of the name, the caveman diet has many of the same principles as the paleo diet. It’s focused primarily on the consumption of higher quantities of real, unprocessed, non-packaged food that cavemen could have eaten thousands of years ago, before Safeway, Walmart, and all of the other mega-super-duper-grocery stores we have available in today’s world came into being. Here are the basics:
According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.
Description: Low-fat or low-carb? A recent New York Times Magazine (July 7, 2002) cover story answered this question and said that Dr. Atkins was right all along, “its not fat that makes us fat but carbohydrates.” Though the government has spent hundreds of millions of dollars in research trying to prove that fat is the cause of obesity, there has been a subtle shift in the scientific consensus over the past five years supporting what the low-carb diet doctors have been saying all along: if we eat less carbohydrates, we will lose weight and live longer.

This Paleo cookbook really is ultimate; the title doesn't lie! Altogether, ten experienced Paleo chefs and bloggers came together to create this amazing, extensive resource for anyone in need of some quality Paleo recipes. There's even an entire chapter dedicated to making the Paleo diet easy with almost eighty fast and simple recipes. There are plenty of great Paleo cookbooks, but this is probably the only one that truly deserves to be called "ultimate." In total, ten popular Paleo bloggers contributed to the creation of this cookbook.


The recipes are hands down, amazing. Every Paleo foodie needs this book on their shelf. The skill level seems to range from simple to intermediate. There are some recipes that you can whip up for a weeknight meal and many others that you can impress dinner guests with. Many of the recipes are ethnic-inspired and they all burst with flavor. When reading this book, it feels like you are hanging out with Michelle and her family learning directly from them about how to eat like a real-food-foodie!
They are snippets of my life and family. They show how I live as someone who eats and lives a primarily Paleo diet and lifestyle. It's real. I don't have the energy nor desire to dress these up and make them fake. You'll see me without makeup (some days), my kitchen messy, me eating stuff I shouldn't. You'll also see me give you tips on making things easier, things I like, and ideas for what to eat or do. And some days they won't have a darn thing to do with Paleo, health, or wellness – it'll just be me and my life.
The recipes themselves cover many different types of dishes, including breakfast, drinks, snacks, desserts and, of course, main meals. With around 100 recipes in total, there is not a large number of recipes in any given category but that scarcely matters. Instead, the book acts as a great source of paleo recipes, regardless of your preferences for food.
This chorizo chili is made in the Crock Pot so it’s going to come out perfectly cooked without much attention from you. It uses a combination of grass fed beef, as well as chorizo sausage which gives it plenty of spice, which is good if you like your chili spicy. Not to worry, there are other spices and seasonings used to kick up the heat, so you can adjust it according to your own taste. For example there are Ro-Tel tomatoes, which carry their own spiciness, so you may want to opt out of those and just use regular tomatoes instead. There’s also cumin, as well as chipotle peppers, just add more or less as desired.
Here’s another complete paleo meal in one “container.” The red bell peppers get cooked to mellow sweetness, but still hold their shape enough to keep other delicious ingredients inside. This recipe, with its peppers and tomatoes, is a great source of vitamins A and C, even after the vitamin loss that cooking causes. It’s also a good source of protein (4 ounces of lean turkey has over 20 grams).
This recipe gives you dinner party elegance in a 20-minute dish. We rely on sea bass, a tender, mild-flavored fish with a lovely buttery quality. There are several sustainable options to choose from (Atlantic black sea bass, for one), so ask questions at the fish counter to ensure you're making a responsible choice. You can also use cod, sablefish (also called black cod), striped bass, or barramundi with great results.
A true labor of love, "Mediterranean Paleo Cooking" is a collaborative effort from nutritionist Caitlin Weeks and her Algerian chef husband, Nabil Boumrar. Together, they explore the flavors of Boumrar's native North Africa, offering an array of gluten-free, Paleo-friendly recipes such as cinnamon-braised beef, almond meatball soup and spicy chicken tagine. Staples like falafel, moussaka, hummus and pita bread are also included, along with multicourse menu plans — providing home cooks with the necessary tools for a Mediterranean-themed dinner party.
This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.
1. Crispy Plantains With Garlic Sauce: A staple of Caribbean cuisine, plantains are delicious fried or mashed. Ripe ones look similar to bananas and can be used in sweet dishes, while green ones mash and crisp up nicely. In this recipe, green plantains are parboiled, smashed and pan-fried, so the center remains soft while the edges provide crunch. The accompanying garlic-lime dipping sauce is sinfully delicious. (via Wellfed)
We get it. Being a mom is full-on and full-time. Equal parts FUN and WTF. Our kids don’t come with instructions, and it’s ok if we don’t have all the answers. We’ll figure it out together. The best advice comes from our favorite experts and doctors, trusted mom friends, and learning on the job. Get your coffee — or wine! — and tune in to hear us spill it all. We got this. This is MOM BRAIN with Hilaria Baldwin and Daphne Oz.
Anytime you keep things simple you’ll be keeping them Paleo. Think about it: early man didn’t complicate things because they couldn’t complicate things. They had to use what was around them, whatever that would have been. They also didn’t have well-equipped kitchens like we have, so their cooking style would have been rudimentary, yet effective. This tomato soup only adds a few different items plus some seasonings to fresh, ripe tomatoes so it’s going to really pop in your mouth, and the tomato flavor will be front and center. Luckily we have things like immersion blenders to make quick work of the preparation process.
Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.

Skillet meals are always nice to make because they generally keep things contained to one pan. In this recipe she’s put together a nice mix of grass-fed ground beef, zucchini, and other supporting ingredients which turns out to be one of the best Paleo beef recipes we’ve discovered. The key is its simplicity, which allows you to enjoy the naturally flavor of the beef, while still getting your vegetables. Tomatoes are used as well, which help the body in many ways, most importantly with their lycopene content. Did you know that by cooking the tomatoes, you’re getting plenty more lycopene than from raw tomatoes?


We mentioned two other cookbooks in the Against All Grain series earlier but this one here is the original book that started it all off. In this case, the cookbook offers 150 different recipes, all of which fall under the paleo diet. For many people, the cookbook would be a great place to start, especially as the recipes have been tried by so many different people since it was first released.
Our ancestors didn’t have 1,000 recipes from which to choose, so it should be far easier for you to eat Paleo than it was for them. This suite of recipe books is pretty extensive, with hundreds of recipes in different categories like fish, red meats, pork, appetizers, and even organ meats. It’s a way to get a solid grounding on what you should be making for yourself, while at the same time giving you quite the database of recipes to select from. They say these recipes will help you burn fat, perform better cognitively, and even slow down the aging process. These meals can be prepared quickly and easily, so you won’t spend all day in the kitchen.
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