Description: Building upon this critical work in Good Calories, Bad Calories and presenting fresh evidence for his claim, Taubes now revisits the urgent question of what’s making us fat—and how we can change—in this exciting new book. Persuasive, straightforward, and practical, Why We Get Fat makes Taubes’s crucial argument newly accessible to a wider audience.
This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.
Most tacos come in a corn tortilla, but these paleo tacos are wrapped in a crisp lettuce leaf. Serve them as an easily packed lunch “sandwich” or as cocktail hour finger food. A 3-ounce serving of skirt steak provides almost half a milligram of vitamin B6, nearly 40 percent of your daily need. People with poor kidney function or with malabsorption conditions like celiac disease especially need to be sure they’re getting enough B6.
This dish shows you how to cook up a simple, yet delicious Paleo stir fry that has only a few main ingredients, but is not short on flavor. It has bell peppers, chicken, some soy sauce, chili powder, and is fried up in coconut oil, so while it may seem like a basic recipe, it actually is full of flavor. This makes a great meal to cook up whenever you need a quick dinner, or lunch and want to keep things light. It is easily adaptable as well, you can use any vegetables you happen to have on hand in order to complete it or build on it.

Shakshuka, a traditional Israeli breakfast food, is a skillet of spiced tomatoes, peppers, and onions with baked eggs. In this version, we swapped out our trusted cast-iron skillet for the walls of a spaghetti squash boat to create a paleo-friendly morning meal. Spaghetti squash adds a creamy texture and sweet flavor to this low-carb spin on a breakfast hash. Sprinkled with fresh cilantro, this hearty breakfast option is perfect for a brunch crowd or a lazy weekend morning in bed.


This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
If you love Mediterranean food as much as I do, then you need this book. The recipes are delectable, hardy, yet simple to make. Caitlin’s husband, Nabil co-wrote this book with her. He is a classically trained chef and you will find his chef’s tips included all through out the book. Caitlin is a Paleo oriented holistic nutritionist. You will also find a shopping list, a healthy food buying guide and nutrition tips form her all throughout the book. Read my full review here.
Steak and eggs are two of the cornerstones of Paleo so why not enjoy them together for even more goodness. This combination though is not new and steak & eggs have been enjoyed for a long time, either in the morning for breakfast or at night for dinner. It also couldn’t really get simpler than this. This is a single recipe, but calculate about two eggs per steak. You can enjoy your eggs pretty much the way you like them usually, but in this recipe the classic sunny side up eggs are prepared. I like to make it so the yolks are still runny and can drip on my steak, enhancing flavor and texture at the same time.
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Brandi currently lives in Kansas City, Missouri and is a self-taught cook and fitness enthusiast. She has focused on healthy recipe development and exercise for 5+ years after reaching a fitness plateau and struggling to lose weight and maintain body goals. Brandi’s goal is to share recipes and workouts that support a consistently healthy lifestyle.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Casseroles are usually a big hit with the family, and perhaps no other casserole can match a pizza casserole. It’s like a pizza stacked onto another pizza and is sure to please the pickiest of eaters, even if that’s you. It’s also a Paleo-friendly recipe, with no crust to speak of, just layer upon layer of yummy items like eggplant, parmesan, sausage, and of course marinara sauce. When it comes to pizza you have to make the determination of how you feel about mozzarella cheese because it’s not a Paleo food, but many followers will have it now and then.
I am doing a low carbohydrate (but not totally Paleo) diet. There are a lot of great recipes in this book. I've already made about half a dozen of the meat dishes, several of the veggies and a dessert. The book is well laid out and truly has a wide variety of types of dishes. I've purchased several of these types of cookbooks, and by far this one is the best. Several co-workers have already ordered their own after looking through mine.
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