Getting kids to eat the food put in front of them can be a tough battle at the best of times, especially as they are often picky eaters. Trying to get them to like specialized food is more challenging still, which is where this book comes in. With that in mind, the design and recipes here are all about finding paleo dishes that kids will genuinely love.
What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.
Shakshuka, a traditional Israeli breakfast food, is a skillet of spiced tomatoes, peppers, and onions with baked eggs. In this version, we swapped out our trusted cast-iron skillet for the walls of a spaghetti squash boat to create a paleo-friendly morning meal. Spaghetti squash adds a creamy texture and sweet flavor to this low-carb spin on a breakfast hash. Sprinkled with fresh cilantro, this hearty breakfast option is perfect for a brunch crowd or a lazy weekend morning in bed.
Creamy Cucumber And Chive Salad Cucumber And Mango Salad Roasted Sweet Potato Salad With Lime Dressing Vietnamese-Style Beef And Mango Salad Cranberry And Clementine Salad Greek Salad Strawberry Broccoli Salad Chopped Salad with Shrimp and Curry Dressing Cranberry Avocado Salad Green Salad With Clementine Dressing Strawberry Pecan Salad Tomato And Spinach Salad Coleslaw With Apples and Poppy Seeds Broccoli and Apple Salad with Walnuts Radish and Cucumber Salad Chorizo And Roasted Potato Salad Creamy Cucumber Salad Strawberry Poppy Seed Salad Citrus and Avocado Salad Chicken Salad With Almond Dressing Fruity Sweet Potato Salad Avocado, Apple And Chicken Salad Chicken Cranberry Salad Fruit Salad With Lemon Dressing Cucumber And Carrot Salad Raw kale salad Raspberry and spinach salad Bacon, grape & broccoli salad
With this crock pot recipe you can create a cashew chicken dish that will rival anything that you can buy from your local Chinese restaurant. The great thing is that because it is using the slow cooker it is going to be a really easy as far as preparation goes. You won’t have to babysit this, all that’s needed is to place the ingredients into the pot and let it cook itself for 3 to 4 hours. The great thing is they’ve used things like arrowroot starch instead of a breading made from wheat. It’s simple and subtle changes like this that can turn a Paleo no-no into a Paleo yum-yum.
Get your shawarma fix satisfied without ruining your dieting efforts with this Paleo approved chicken shawarma. It isn’t cooked the way traditional shawarma is, but it is still grilled, which gives it a nice flavor, and it is using a blend of spices that will give you the taste that you’re seeking out when you’re in shawarma mode. That’s because it’s marinated, so the flavors have a chance to soak into the chicken. He’s even provided a recipe for Paleo friendly hummus, so you can dip the pieces of chicken into that, or simply eat them solo.
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
A key selling point of The Healing Kitchen is that it goes beyond the basic paleo diet. Instead, the authors also focus on providing information and inspiration about cooking for people with a chronic illness or autoimmune diseases. This approach is powerful for anybody who focuses on food as medicine, especially as the meals we eat can play a large role in our health.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
Not surprisingly, Paleo for Beginners focuses on teaching people how to get started with a paleo diet. To do this, the author includes information about the diet itself and recommended foods, along with a transition plan, a shopping guide and, of course, the recipes themselves. The information provided isn’t as comprehensive as Practical Paleo, which was discussed earlier. Nevertheless, Paleo for Beginners does achieve its goal well and is effective if you want something a little more concise.
This is hands down the best Paleo recipe guide you can get for the money, and there isn’t even a close second. It has over 350 recipes that show you how to cook with all of the wholesome foods you should be eating, and deftly avoids all of the junk that mucks up your system and makes you sluggish and fat. It’s laid out in such a manner that you can clearly see what you’ll need, and how to make it. There’s even an 8 week autopilot meal plan that takes out all of the guesswork to make this caveman simple to follow.
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