This salsa chicken is advertised as being very simple, which will help you whip it up and get it in the crockpot quickly so you can get on with your day. Imagine getting this ready in the morning in just a few minutes, and coming home at the end of the day to a fully cooked meal ready to be eaten. That’s the concept here and she pulls it off nicely with organic salsa, chicken breast, a bit of chili powder, and an onion. We recommend you don’t serve this with a side salad to help make it a complete meal, as it’s a bit light on the vegetables.
Beef, it’s what’s for dinner on the Paleo diet, and these beef kebabs are made with sirloin, a premium cut of meat known for being lean. You want to take extra care to buy grass-fed beef when eating Paleo because it’s what a cow naturally eats, and doesn’t contain all of the additives they put in conventional cattle feed these days. Notice that they’ve also grilled up skewers with just vegetables. That’s because Paleo requires matching your meat intake with your vegetable intake for the right balance. She walks you through how to marinate the meat before grilling them, which ensures they’ll be flavorful and tender.
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.
What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.

If you are planning on doing a Whole30 in the New Year, then this book is a perfect resource. Almost all of the recipes are Whole30 approved. The first 30 pages of this book are filled with information that will teach you how to adapt a Paleo lifestyle and live it successfully. This book is packed with 200 recipes and quick meal ideas! Melissa has even included adaptations for those of you following an Autoimmune Protocol. This section is particularly helpful, as it is often hard to find Paleo recipes that are also void of nightshades and nuts. Read my full review here.


Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.

Skillet meals are always nice to make because they generally keep things contained to one pan. In this recipe she’s put together a nice mix of grass-fed ground beef, zucchini, and other supporting ingredients which turns out to be one of the best Paleo beef recipes we’ve discovered. The key is its simplicity, which allows you to enjoy the naturally flavor of the beef, while still getting your vegetables. Tomatoes are used as well, which help the body in many ways, most importantly with their lycopene content. Did you know that by cooking the tomatoes, you’re getting plenty more lycopene than from raw tomatoes?


Junk food and takeout tend to have a strong hold over people, even when they’re attempting to eat healthily. This cookbook attempts to tackle that problem by introducing a range of different paleo dishes that are variations on common takeout meals. This includes recipes from many different cultures, including Indian, Mexican, Greek and American meals.


These berries are wrapped in prosciutto and stuffed with a blend of cheese and greens. They make for a fun snack, and are also great for entertaining. If you’ve been worried that you can’t host a party or serve guests Paleo foods, there’s no need to worry. Many of the dishes that you make will not look any different than “normal” food, and if you don’t want to tell anyone it’s Paleo friendly, you don’t have to. In this recipe they’re using ricotta, but they are making sure it’s grass-fed. If you are unable to process any sort of dairy you’ll want to omit this part, but many Paleo followers allow a bit of high quality cheese now and then.

This book is particularly geared towards entertaining friends and family with stunning Paleo meals that they might not even know are Paleo. The typical problem presents itself that you want to entertain, but you don’t want to sacrifice your progress by eating a bunch of foods that aren’t Paleo friendly. The answer is to cater your own Paleo approved foods, and this recipe guide shows you how to make foods that everyone will enjoy, regardless of whether or not they share your Paleo philosophy. It has everything from a full dinner party to just a casual get together. Become a master Paleo host with this guide.
Courtney loves to share great wine, good food, and loves to explore far flung places- all while masting an everyday elegant and easy style. Courtney writes the popular creative lifestyle blog Sweet C’s Designs- a site devoted to delicious everyday recipes, home decor, crafts, DIY inspiration, and photography tips to help make your every day extraordinary.
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
Kale chips make a great snack because they don’t contain anything that’s unhealthy for you. In this recipe she’s simply using curly kale and olive oil, so you are getting all of the benefits of kale, without any hydrogenated oils or industrial grade salt. You won’t believe how crispy and crunchy kale gets when you bake it until you try it. And since it is loaded with fiber, and has respectable amounts of potassium, with Vitamin A and Vitamin C levels that are off the charts, this is one of the healthiest snacks around. It’s also low in calories and fat, and the olive oil only adds healthy fat to the equation.
This chicken salad keeps things light and has an eclectic mix of meat, fruit, and vegetables, so you’ll feel great after eating it. While some might think that Paleo eating doesn’t include salads, this is a misperception. In fact, you’ll likely end up eating more salads than you ever did before so you can balance out a meal. This salad makes a great lunch, and will surely give you energy to help you through the rest of the day, without a sluggish after lunch feeling. Consider using baby spinach or baby kale leaves instead of ordinary lettuce for the base.
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Hi Kirsty, I recommend any diet that encourages clean eating and avoiding processed food. It doesn’t really matter which one. The more from scratch you cook the better. You can also talk to a trainer to work out some exercise specifically for fat burning just make sure to measure your belly/thighs or wherever you want to loose weight to NOT worry about weight but rather body shape. Muscle weighs more than fat so you might not loose weight but loose fat and become leaner. Diet and exercise go hand in hand. One won’t work without the other. Most importantly though….go you for carrying 3 human beings in your amazing body be kind to yourself and your body, it’s done a hell of a lot of amazing work :)


This is an easy way to musakhan, and if you don’t know how to make this traditional dish, this is a great place to start. It uses plenty of chicken thighs, so you’ll be all set in the protein department. It also contains plenty of spices like allspice, cloves, and saffron. You’ll be getting a few onions in this, but you may want to eat a salad with it because there are not a lot of vegetables being used, and you want to create a nice balance between all that chicken and your vegetable intake. Don’t be afraid to try new recipes on Paleo, trial and error is how our species made it this far.
Chicken parmesan is not something that you would typically be having on Paleo because it is coated in bread crumbs. But this chicken parm is coated with Parmesan cheese and almond flour, which replaces the bread crumbs. You’ll still get that classic crunchy outer covering on the chicken, and of course the Parmesan will be baked right onto the chicken, so it’s just a matter of getting the other ingredients right. For the tomato sauce they are using garlic, oregano, and olive oil, and you can top it off with basil leaves and optional mozzarella cheese.
With over 200 recipes, all Paleo friendly, you know you’re in for a treat with the Caveman Feast. All you need to do to get a feel for the type of quality recipes you’re going to get is check out the ones he’s providing for free at his Civilized Caveman site. You can only imagine that he’s saving the best for this compilation, and to sweeten the deal he’s including a series of bonuses that give you plenty of information right from the top authoritative sources on what’s Paleo and what isn’t. So cut out all of the contradictory information and get down to the real meat, literally and figuratively.
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