Crackling with humor and bursting with flavor, Nom Nom Paleo offers a fun, fresh approach to cooking with whole, unprocessed ingredients free of grains, legumes, and added sugar. New York Times bestselling authors Michelle Tam and Henry Fong have cooked up a visual feast with their debut cookbook, featuring more than 100 foolproof Paleo recipes and over 900 step-by-step photographs and cartoons. There’s something for everyone here, whether you’re a busy mom, a triathlete in training, or a lifelong foodie who’s curious about the “caveman” approach to eating.
Against All Grain is one of the most popular series for paleo cooking out there and this book is one interesting entry. The idea with this particular book is easy meals that can be made for dinners throughout the week. The cookbook also includes tips and tricks about getting the best outcomes, along with shopping lists to help people plan effectively. The cookbook is also visually stunning, with many photos to inspire you.

These breakfast cups use two primary ingredients that are Paleo friendly: ham and eggs. They make a cup out of the ham so that the egg can rest inside of it. This means you are not getting any additional ingredients to muck things up, and they have kept it very simple. In fact there are only two other ingredients, and one of those is optional. You just add a bit of green onion, and if you feel like it you can put a bit of cheese on. They are using nitrate free ham, so you can tell that there is plenty of attention being given to using quality ingredients.

There's no one "right way" to do paleo. If you're just starting out, it may take some time to figure out what feels best. Maybe you just eat paleo after 2 p.m. on weekdays; maybe you are so hardcore, you get uneasy just looking at a slice of bread. Most of us fall somewhere in between. We're advocates of a more generally "paleo-based" system, following paleo principles most of the time, but making reasonable exceptions for important events or your mom's famous chocolate chip cookies.

This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
Perhaps the best part of this Paleo fish taco recipe is that they show you how to make wraps or tortillas without using any all-purpose flour, so you can use these for all sorts of different recipes. In this particular recipe they are using mahi mahi that’s been coated in olive oil and then seasoned. They also serve them up with a tasty mango barbecue sauce that incorporates apple cider vinegar into it. There is also a cilantro mayo which is made from a Paleo friendly mayonnaise recipe, as well as coconut milk, chili powder, and cayenne.
Yes, the egg is raw, and raw egg is perfectly safe to consume, so long as you trust the source of your eggs. Anything you buy from a grocery store should be set, and if you get them from the Farmer’s Market or grow your own, just make sure you wash the shell VERY WELL before using raw egg, as this is where most of the contaminate comes from. (The shell isn’t sterile, you crack the egg, the shell contacts the egg and leaves some salmonella behind, the egg is now unsafe)
This breakfast casserole is something the whole family can enjoy, even if they are not following Paleo. It’s made with plenty of thick strips of bacon, and it also has parsnips and plenty of eggs in it, with coconut oil being used to cook it up. You’ll find that many breakfast casseroles will incorporate hash browns into the recipe, but potatoes are not allowed on Paleo so you want to avoid these recipes and find alternative ways to get the same effect. In this case they are using parsnips as a replacement to give it the bulk and texture it needs.
We mentioned two other cookbooks in the Against All Grain series earlier but this one here is the original book that started it all off. In this case, the cookbook offers 150 different recipes, all of which fall under the paleo diet. For many people, the cookbook would be a great place to start, especially as the recipes have been tried by so many different people since it was first released.
However, what sets this book apart is its deep dive into the health benefits of paleo eating. There are meal plans specifically designed to address health problems like hormone imbalances or adrenal problems, as well as in-depth explanations of how food can impact your health. Some reviewers say the health information can get a little confusing, but most agree that it’s extremely helpful for understanding the benefits of paleo eating.
The recipes are hands down, amazing. Every Paleo foodie needs this book on their shelf. The skill level seems to range from simple to intermediate. There are some recipes that you can whip up for a weeknight meal and many others that you can impress dinner guests with. Many of the recipes are ethnic-inspired and they all burst with flavor. When reading this book, it feels like you are hanging out with Michelle and her family learning directly from them about how to eat like a real-food-foodie!

A key selling point of The Healing Kitchen is that it goes beyond the basic paleo diet. Instead, the authors also focus on providing information and inspiration about cooking for people with a chronic illness or autoimmune diseases. This approach is powerful for anybody who focuses on food as medicine, especially as the meals we eat can play a large role in our health.
The Paleo Kids Cookbook: Transition Your Family to Delicious Grain- and Gluten-free Food for a Lifetime of Healthy Eating by Jennifer Robins contains 100 paleo recipes specifically designed for kids’ tastes and nutritional needs. You’ll find recipes such as chicken nuggets, pizza pockets, animal crackers, sweet potato bacon tots, soft pretzels, and more. Plus, there are helpful strategies for getting kids involved in the cooking process and teaching them about paleo eating.
Most commercial goods will be off limits while you’re on the Paleo diet because they are filled with processed ingredients, grains, chemicals, and other foods that just aren’t able to make the cut while eating the Paleo way. These spiced scones do a good job of replacing the pumpkin spiced scones you find at your local Starbucks when the season is right. The trick is they don’t use any ingredients that aren’t on the Paleo list of approved foods, so you’re totally in the clear. Isn’t it great that Paleo minded chefs are hard at work to bring you guilt-free recipes like these?

Those who have been on the Paleo diet also say that once all the refined sugar and dairy are cut from the diet—about two to three months in—their level of energy is noticeably higher than before, so they’re even more motivated to work out and follow a Paleo diet, all part of the lifestyle. The key to success is to start small and build on your success.

In "The Zenbelly Cookbook," Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly dishes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.
Junk food and takeout tend to have a strong hold over people, even when they’re attempting to eat healthily. This cookbook attempts to tackle that problem by introducing a range of different paleo dishes that are variations on common takeout meals. This includes recipes from many different cultures, including Indian, Mexican, Greek and American meals.
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
You might have heard about the paleo diet by now — a way to eat based on how our hunter-gatherer ancestors (read: cavemen) did it back in the day. While going paleo eliminates some tasty modern options like breads, pastas, and other grains, along with legumes, dairy, and soy, it emphasizes other delectable, whole foods that provide various health benefits.

Quiche is usually fair game on the Paleo diet because it’s primarily made with eggs, and eggs are definitely a Paleo approved food. This particular quiche recipe includes plenty of delicious ingredients, and she’s topped it off with a zucchini hash crust so it’s crunchy on the top, and full of eggs and yummy vegetables on the bottom. All of the ingredients that are not Paleo in a traditional quiche have been removed and replaced with Paleo perfect items. Flax meal is used as an optional ingredient, and we’d suggest it since it adds beneficial omega-3s to the mix.
These burgers are inspired by Thanksgiving dinner. They’re made from turkey instead of beef or chicken, and are served with a cranberry aioli to invoke memories of cranberry sauce that’s served with the Thanksgiving turkey. But the most interesting thing about this recipe is the sweet potato buns made from fresh sweet potatoes instead of going without a bun. You don’t have to wait around until the holidays to enjoy the flavors you love.
On nights I want to guarantee both cooking and cleanup are a total breeze, I lean on recipes that come together with a single pot, pan, or skillet. One-pan is basically kitchen code for "easy" — something you can totally appreciate when you're following a Paleo diet. Since the diet makes eating out and ordering in kind of tricky (although not impossible), it requires a lot of cooking. So why not keep delicious grain- and dairy-free dinners as simple as possible, with one of these 15 recipes that come together in a single pot, pan, or skillet?
You can eat well and never worry about feeling deprived because this great cookbook offers creative meal ideas for even the pickiest of eaters.  Cravings are taken care of easily and time convenience is certainly gained with several weeknight meals included.  Everyone receives pre-made shopping lists to make the next grocery trip more convenient and productive.
Don't let your dietary restrictions get in the way of a great party. With "Gather: The Art of Paleo Entertaining," authors Haley Mason and Bill Staley show how to impress uninitiated guests with a multicultural Paleo menu. Dishes like Costillitas (Cuban-style baby back ribs) and General Tso's Chicken are perfect for large family get-togethers, while the recipes can be scaled back to a party of two. Organized by season to ensure the freshest ingredients, the book also offers tips on pulling off an elegant holiday feast.

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Junk food and takeout tend to have a strong hold over people, even when they’re attempting to eat healthily. This cookbook attempts to tackle that problem by introducing a range of different paleo dishes that are variations on common takeout meals. This includes recipes from many different cultures, including Indian, Mexican, Greek and American meals.
Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.

A new book that just came out will have a lower rating, just because it’s had less time to be rated. Look through the list and find the ones that look good to you and have fun doing it. You can click on the picture or the title and it will take your right to the Amazon website where that particular book is sold. Have fun and enjoy cooking Paleo recipes.

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