Not paleo specifically, but this gorgeously designed book is full of plant-forward recipes that are either Whole30-compliant already or require a little bit of adaptation to fit into the plan. At any rate, I always welcome extra inspiration when it comes to vegetables, so I love paging through this one. The photography and design is really stunning and makes me want to eat zucchini ribbons all day. Buy it here.
Kale chips make a great snack because they don’t contain anything that’s unhealthy for you. In this recipe she’s simply using curly kale and olive oil, so you are getting all of the benefits of kale, without any hydrogenated oils or industrial grade salt. You won’t believe how crispy and crunchy kale gets when you bake it until you try it. And since it is loaded with fiber, and has respectable amounts of potassium, with Vitamin A and Vitamin C levels that are off the charts, this is one of the healthiest snacks around. It’s also low in calories and fat, and the olive oil only adds healthy fat to the equation.
Making a pizza crust from cauliflower is something you just have to try if you haven’t yet. You’ll be surprised that a vegetable can double as a pizza crust, and even more surprised to learn that it actually tastes good. This pizza makes use of bacon, so it has an unfair advantage on your taste buds. There’s also spinach as a topping, so you’re definitely covered in the vegetable department. Coconut flour helps the cauliflower turn out like a pizza crust, so you won’t be focused on that while you’re eating and you can focus on the bacon.
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)

The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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