The idea behind this cookbook is interesting. Basically, the author is relying on 15 key ingredients. With these, she offers 150 different recipes and a total of 450 variations. Now, this doesn’t mean that the book only uses 15 ingredients. Instead, those ingredients act as bases for the recipes and are expanded upon. So, you will still need some other ingredients.
Getting kids to eat the food put in front of them can be a tough battle at the best of times, especially as they are often picky eaters. Trying to get them to like specialized food is more challenging still, which is where this book comes in. With that in mind, the design and recipes here are all about finding paleo dishes that kids will genuinely love.
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This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.
You can eat well and never worry about feeling deprived because this great cookbook offers creative meal ideas for even the pickiest of eaters.  Cravings are taken care of easily and time convenience is certainly gained with several weeknight meals included.  Everyone receives pre-made shopping lists to make the next grocery trip more convenient and productive.

The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.
Check out this deal for heritage breed bacon and pork, free-range organic chicken, and 100% grass-fed beef! I have partnered with Butcher Box to deliver exclusive deals for my audience. All of the meat from Butcher Box is certified-free from antibiotics and hormones. It’s also uncured and free of added sugar and nitrates (nitrates are linked to cancer and a huge NO, NO) most importantly it has been taste tested by me, and passes with flying colors!
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
How does pre-order work? If you order now, ahead of the January 6 release date, you’ll enjoy 25% savings off the cover price. Early bird gets the worm here! Then, when the book is finally released, it’ll be automatically shipped to you. Bonus: Usually pre-ordered books arrive a few days before the actual release date, though that isn’t a promise. Pre-orders are handled through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, Google Play or IndieBound.
Steak and eggs are two of the cornerstones of Paleo so why not enjoy them together for even more goodness. This combination though is not new and steak & eggs have been enjoyed for a long time, either in the morning for breakfast or at night for dinner. It also couldn’t really get simpler than this. This is a single recipe, but calculate about two eggs per steak. You can enjoy your eggs pretty much the way you like them usually, but in this recipe the classic sunny side up eggs are prepared. I like to make it so the yolks are still runny and can drip on my steak, enhancing flavor and texture at the same time.
Creamy Cucumber And Chive Salad Cucumber And Mango Salad Roasted Sweet Potato Salad With Lime Dressing Vietnamese-Style Beef And Mango Salad Cranberry And Clementine Salad Greek Salad Strawberry Broccoli Salad Chopped Salad with Shrimp and Curry Dressing Cranberry Avocado Salad Green Salad With Clementine Dressing Strawberry Pecan Salad Tomato And Spinach Salad Coleslaw With Apples and Poppy Seeds Broccoli and Apple Salad with Walnuts Radish and Cucumber Salad Chorizo And Roasted Potato Salad Creamy Cucumber Salad Strawberry Poppy Seed Salad Citrus and Avocado Salad Chicken Salad With Almond Dressing Fruity Sweet Potato Salad Avocado, Apple And Chicken Salad Chicken Cranberry Salad Fruit Salad With Lemon Dressing Cucumber And Carrot Salad Raw kale salad Raspberry and spinach salad Bacon, grape & broccoli salad
The main limitation to mention is the layout. In particular, the overall design and font size means that some parts of the recipes are hard to read – especially if you’re trying to follow the recipe while cooking. The problem may not be dramatic for everybody but it would be a particularly significant issue for anybody with even minor vision challenges.

I there, I’m cooking for my friend who has secondary cancer and has strict guidelines on what she can eat. She told me that it’s pretty much Paleo how she been advice to eat. Anyway my question is… On title of this list is a picture of raspberries in the jar with something? I want that recipe pretty please? I think she will be able to eat that as it doesn’t have almond meal or anything like that. Thanks in advance.

Eggs are an excellent foundation for paleo breakfasts. Over easy, scrambled, poached, baked, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, made into an omelet—you name it. You can also experiment with paleo pancakes, using protein powder, coconut flour, or almond flour in lieu of white flour (tip: add baking soda and vinegar for a fluffier outcome). Chia puddings, sweet potato "toast," and paleo-friendly smoothies are also fair game.
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
You wouldn’t be able to eat traditional tabbouleh while following the Paleo diet because it’s made from bulgur, but you can have as much of this cauliflower tabbouleh as you want. Cauliflower is a very versatile food and is used in Paleo recipes to replace everything from rice, to pizza crusts. Here it works perfectly when mixed with other ingredients and spices that are usually found in tabbouleh. It has cilantro, lemon juice, lime juice, and tomatoes. The tomatoes will give it plenty of flavor as well as lycopene, vitamins, and minerals making this a healthy item to serve up alongside any meat dish.

Beyond Bacon is not only packed with mouth-watering recipes, but the Paleo Parents also teach us how to find affordable pastured pork and teach us about the nutritional value of including pork in our diets. In addition, I love how the recipes are marked as easy, intermediate and difficult. This book is elegant, informative and would look stunning on your coffee table!

Anytime you keep things simple you’ll be keeping them Paleo. Think about it: early man didn’t complicate things because they couldn’t complicate things. They had to use what was around them, whatever that would have been. They also didn’t have well-equipped kitchens like we have, so their cooking style would have been rudimentary, yet effective. This tomato soup only adds a few different items plus some seasonings to fresh, ripe tomatoes so it’s going to really pop in your mouth, and the tomato flavor will be front and center. Luckily we have things like immersion blenders to make quick work of the preparation process.
This sundae is trying to replicate the joy experienced from eating an Almond Joy, without including all of the ingredients they contain that aren’t good for you. Imagine, a guilt-free ice cream treat, that’s what she’s going for here. The chocolate being used is dark chocolate, so already you’re doing better than if you were using milk chocolate. The coconut of course comes from real coconut, but it’s unsweetened coconut flakes so you’re not getting refined sugar, as the sweetness in this sweet treat comes from honey. The almonds add healthy fat and are an essential part of this Almond Joy sundae.
This mackerel recipe uses a pound of fresh mackerel with the skin left on. It is advertised as being served with a magic sauce and without taking any of the magic away we can tell you that it’s made with sherry, honey, some vinegar, and fresh ginger so it’s going to taste incredible, without using any ingredients that will set you back on your progress. On Paleo you may see yourself eating more fish than you used to eat, because it is such a healthy meat, and something our ancestors surely would have eaten. They have it served on a bed of cauli-rice, a rice substitute made from cauliflower.
The one thing to note is that the complexity of the recipes is somewhat divisive. Some people feel that the recipes are simple and easy to follow, while others find them overly complicated. As is often the case, reality is somewhere in the middle. By paleo standards, the recipes aren’t too bad, especially given you need a good balance of macros to maximize performance. Nevertheless, if you are new to paleo, the recipes may seem a little confusing at first, although you would get used to them.
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This salsa chicken is advertised as being very simple, which will help you whip it up and get it in the crockpot quickly so you can get on with your day. Imagine getting this ready in the morning in just a few minutes, and coming home at the end of the day to a fully cooked meal ready to be eaten. That’s the concept here and she pulls it off nicely with organic salsa, chicken breast, a bit of chili powder, and an onion. We recommend you don’t serve this with a side salad to help make it a complete meal, as it’s a bit light on the vegetables.
You’ll get over 120 recipes in this highly rated book that shows you how to cook up Paleo food for you as well as your family. If you’ve ever wanted a “diet” where you don’t have to count calories, or eat specially labeled diet foods, Paleo is the way to go and this book is the way to get started. It has information that has been peer reviewed and time tested and is sure to teach you at least something about Paleo that you didn’t know. The recipes are laid out in a manner that is easy to follow, so you’ll be sure to stick with it and learn the right way to do things.
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