The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.
This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
Introducing paleo food to a family can be tough, especially as many people are resistant to the idea. As a result, this cookbook offers one potential way around the problem, by focusing on recipes that aren’t obviously paleo. The meals would also work well for many families because they don’t use incredibly obscure ingredients and often don’t have as many steps as other paleo recipes.
This dish shows you how to cook up a simple, yet delicious Paleo stir fry that has only a few main ingredients, but is not short on flavor. It has bell peppers, chicken, some soy sauce, chili powder, and is fried up in coconut oil, so while it may seem like a basic recipe, it actually is full of flavor. This makes a great meal to cook up whenever you need a quick dinner, or lunch and want to keep things light. It is easily adaptable as well, you can use any vegetables you happen to have on hand in order to complete it or build on it.
This sundae is trying to replicate the joy experienced from eating an Almond Joy, without including all of the ingredients they contain that aren’t good for you. Imagine, a guilt-free ice cream treat, that’s what she’s going for here. The chocolate being used is dark chocolate, so already you’re doing better than if you were using milk chocolate. The coconut of course comes from real coconut, but it’s unsweetened coconut flakes so you’re not getting refined sugar, as the sweetness in this sweet treat comes from honey. The almonds add healthy fat and are an essential part of this Almond Joy sundae.
Perhaps you know this by the French name mille-feuille, but it also goes by Napoleon. Following a traditional mille-feuille recipe will get you into trouble on Paleo because of all the puff pastry and pastry cream that is used. Here they’ve made a faux version, and they’ve made it Paleo friendly so you won’t have to feel bad about eating it. The puff pastry has been replaced with almond flour, so no concerns about wheat or grains, and the filling is made with no dairy, using only ingredients commonly found in Paleo cooking and baking recipes.
These burgers are inspired by Thanksgiving dinner. They’re made from turkey instead of beef or chicken, and are served with a cranberry aioli to invoke memories of cranberry sauce that’s served with the Thanksgiving turkey. But the most interesting thing about this recipe is the sweet potato buns made from fresh sweet potatoes instead of going without a bun. You don’t have to wait around until the holidays to enjoy the flavors you love.
Spiralized sweet potatoes make for a hearty pasta replacement in this fresh feeling paleo meal. Puttanesca is an ultra-savory Italian pasta dish that typically consists of capers, anchovies, olives, tomatoes, garlic, and olive oil. In this iteration, fresh tomatoes meet their salty match for a hearty, dairy-free pasta dish that's light on calories and heavy on flavor. For a vegetarian option, leave out the anchovies and use vegetable broth instead of chicken.
For busy commuters, it is easy to get in the rut of eating hard boiled eggs every morning.  This book will help you keep both your breakfasts and lunches exciting, even with a busy work schedule. The recipes are not only delicious and healthy, they are easy to make. In addition, Diana is a nutritional therapist and offers the reader tons of practical tips on how to follow a Paleo diet, including a guide for eating out!
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
We're not entirely certain about the history of this classic recipe's name, but perhaps it has something to do with the spicy kick of the sauce. Our version is a shakshuka-like dish in which fiery harissa paste and heady spices slowly infused a rich tomato sauce where eggs gently poach. Look for jars of harissa with the Middle Eastern foods in your supermarket; you can substitute a half to full teaspoon of crushed red pepper in a pinch. The cook time for the eggs depends on the specific heat of your slow cooker. We offer a range of 15 to 20 minutes, so start checking at 15 minutes (or a couple minutes earlier) to ensure the eggs get done to your liking. 
I there, I’m cooking for my friend who has secondary cancer and has strict guidelines on what she can eat. She told me that it’s pretty much Paleo how she been advice to eat. Anyway my question is… On title of this list is a picture of raspberries in the jar with something? I want that recipe pretty please? I think she will be able to eat that as it doesn’t have almond meal or anything like that. Thanks in advance.

You can still enjoy all the taste of a juicy, veggie-topped burger without any of the excess calories due to a thick bun or heavy mayo-based sauce. This paleo salad features a hearty burger patty, fresh lettuce and tomatoes, and an herb-y vinaigrette to drizzle atop. We love the richness that a little ground lamb offers, but you can use all beef or even ground turkey instead.
Anytime you keep things simple you’ll be keeping them Paleo. Think about it: early man didn’t complicate things because they couldn’t complicate things. They had to use what was around them, whatever that would have been. They also didn’t have well-equipped kitchens like we have, so their cooking style would have been rudimentary, yet effective. This tomato soup only adds a few different items plus some seasonings to fresh, ripe tomatoes so it’s going to really pop in your mouth, and the tomato flavor will be front and center. Luckily we have things like immersion blenders to make quick work of the preparation process.
You can usually find flank steak on sale at the local grocery store, just make sure that you’re getting a high quality version that is organic, or grass fed. She’s provided a way to take this cut of meat and turn it into something special that’s marinated in citrus juices so it’ll come out very tender and juicy. She’s using the juice of an orange and a couple of limes for the marinade, and there are also some additional ingredients used like olive oil, chili powder, and cilantro. Notice how she’s paired this with a side of mixed vegetables which is a big facet of Paleo eating.

These meatballs attempt to capture the taste of chicken enchiladas verde, so if you don’t feel like making up a giant pan of Paleo friendly enchiladas, you can go with this meatball recipe and get a similar results. They are able to pull it off by using a pound of ground chicken, and you want to make sure that the chicken is organic. They are using almond flour to replace breadcrumbs that you’ll usually find in meatball recipes to help hold it all together. They also have it topped with some salsa verde to complete the green enchilada mission.


These recipes are created with ease in mind, as we’re often cooking for others and accommodating our busy schedules… but they also all taste amazing. These are the same recipes we take to barbecues and birthday parties to be enjoyed by several people with different tastes. You can be sure that you will enjoy cooking these recipes as much as you’ll enjoy eating them – and food is always better when shared!
With over 200 recipes, all Paleo friendly, you know you’re in for a treat with the Caveman Feast. All you need to do to get a feel for the type of quality recipes you’re going to get is check out the ones he’s providing for free at his Civilized Caveman site. You can only imagine that he’s saving the best for this compilation, and to sweeten the deal he’s including a series of bonuses that give you plenty of information right from the top authoritative sources on what’s Paleo and what isn’t. So cut out all of the contradictory information and get down to the real meat, literally and figuratively.
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