We're not entirely certain about the history of this classic recipe's name, but perhaps it has something to do with the spicy kick of the sauce. Our version is a shakshuka-like dish in which fiery harissa paste and heady spices slowly infused a rich tomato sauce where eggs gently poach. Look for jars of harissa with the Middle Eastern foods in your supermarket; you can substitute a half to full teaspoon of crushed red pepper in a pinch. The cook time for the eggs depends on the specific heat of your slow cooker. We offer a range of 15 to 20 minutes, so start checking at 15 minutes (or a couple minutes earlier) to ensure the eggs get done to your liking. 

The Paleo Kids Cookbook: Transition Your Family to Delicious Grain- and Gluten-free Food for a Lifetime of Healthy Eating by Jennifer Robins contains 100 paleo recipes specifically designed for kids’ tastes and nutritional needs. You’ll find recipes such as chicken nuggets, pizza pockets, animal crackers, sweet potato bacon tots, soft pretzels, and more. Plus, there are helpful strategies for getting kids involved in the cooking process and teaching them about paleo eating.
The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body, by Sarah Ballantyne, PhD. This book is billed as a solution for autoimmune diseases, in which the body’s immune system attacks its own cells. In the text, Ballantyne discusses her own struggles with autoimmune disease and helps guide readers on how the paleo diet may help relieve their symptoms, too.
This Crock Pot roast has everything you’d want from a traditional Sunday roast, all in one pot. The beauty of it is that everything comes out perfectly cooked so the meat is very tender and juicy and the carrots, celery, onions, and cauliflower all come out soft and ready to eat. A major bonus to this is just how easy it is to get everything prepared and put into the slow cooker. Most roasts will have you checking in on it from time to time, but this one let’s you relax for about 8 hours before you have to do anything else to it.
"Paleo Home Cooking" caters to gluten-free newbies and veterans alike. Author Sonia Lacasse clearly lays out which foods you'll target, which you may occasionally indulge in and which you must "absolutely, positively stay away from." Among its 150 delectable recipes are homemade nut butters, naturally sweetened desserts, salads to last all week and scrumptious seafood and meat dishes, such as Hearty Meatballs in Wild Mushroom Sauce or Paleo Moussaka with creamy eggplant, spicy lamb and béchamel sauce.
Introducing paleo food to a family can be tough, especially as many people are resistant to the idea. As a result, this cookbook offers one potential way around the problem, by focusing on recipes that aren’t obviously paleo. The meals would also work well for many families because they don’t use incredibly obscure ingredients and often don’t have as many steps as other paleo recipes.
The mild flavor of spinach makes it wonderfully adaptable to sizzling garlic and spice from the crushed red pepper. For fullest flavor, cook spinach only until it begins to turn limp. Sautéed spinach can be made in a snap and pairs perfectly with almost every protein. If you have leftover spinach on hand or any wilting leafy greens, sautéing with a little olive oil and garlic instantly brings it back to life. Starting aromatics in a cold skillet lets them infuse the oil. The garlic also has less chance of burning. Let cooked potatoes dry out so they'll be extra crispy in the hash. Leftover cooked potatoes would be even better. Ground chicken has a touch more fat than ground chicken breast, key for more flavorful hash. Serve with Sautéed Spinach with Garlic and Red Pepper.
You wouldn’t be able to eat traditional tabbouleh while following the Paleo diet because it’s made from bulgur, but you can have as much of this cauliflower tabbouleh as you want. Cauliflower is a very versatile food and is used in Paleo recipes to replace everything from rice, to pizza crusts. Here it works perfectly when mixed with other ingredients and spices that are usually found in tabbouleh. It has cilantro, lemon juice, lime juice, and tomatoes. The tomatoes will give it plenty of flavor as well as lycopene, vitamins, and minerals making this a healthy item to serve up alongside any meat dish.
This recipe is inspired by Indochina cuisine and features chilli chicken that gets marinated in a special blend of spices. The red chillies are going to give this a pretty good spiciness to this dish, so if you don’t like spicy foods you may want to pass on this one, or make adjustments to the peppers, using ones that aren’t as potent. It’s served on a bed of cauliflower rice to keep it Paleo friendly. You’ll find that cauliflower is a versatile way to make rice and couscous replacements, and it satisfies your vegetable requirement.

We mentioned two other cookbooks in the Against All Grain series earlier but this one here is the original book that started it all off. In this case, the cookbook offers 150 different recipes, all of which fall under the paleo diet. For many people, the cookbook would be a great place to start, especially as the recipes have been tried by so many different people since it was first released.


I went on Saturday morning and I excitedly told the young girl about finding your blog. The owner was out at the farmers market. I got the chicken salad wrap….delish! I purchases the paleo wraps and can’t wait to make my own this week. I am new paleo….I’ve tried many ways of eating…from raw to lord knows what. I’m 56 in pretty good health but have a bad hip. I need to loose about 20 pounds and want to do it healthfully and have the weight stay off and this be a lifestyle. I’ll be following your blog and maybe I’ll see you at Vive!
Spiced Hot Apple Cider Mint And Citrus Water Matcha Smoothie Paleo Eggnog Pink Grapefruit Lemonade Peach And Raspberry Lemonade Strawberry-Kiwi Mojito Smoothie Chocolate Avocado Strawberry Smoothie Frozen Coconut Strawberry Drink Pomegranate Green Tea Coconut Milk Hot Chocolate Frozen Chocolate Smoothie Watermelon Sports Drink Frozen Coconut Limeade Coconut Strawberry Lemonade Lemon Mint Iced Tea Raspberry-Lime Flavored Water Fresh lemonade with thyme Strawberry rhubarb lemonade Banana Mango Smoothie
You can still enjoy all the taste of a juicy, veggie-topped burger without any of the excess calories due to a thick bun or heavy mayo-based sauce. This paleo salad features a hearty burger patty, fresh lettuce and tomatoes, and an herb-y vinaigrette to drizzle atop. We love the richness that a little ground lamb offers, but you can use all beef or even ground turkey instead.
A paleo diet promotes high-protein recipes with responsibly raised, antibiotic- and hormone-free meats and poultry, and wild-caught, sustainably sourced seafood. Good fat comes in as a close second, with sources like nuts, seeds, coconut oil, avocado oil, and extra virgin olive oil as excellent choices. Vegetables are also key, as long as they're not too starchy. Avoid white potatoes, but most fresh veggies are fair game.
These burgers have been doctored up in a number of ways. First they have figs cooked right into them, and the figs get finely chopped so you won’t even notice the texture. They give the burgers a sweet tartness, which is then combined with the savory and unmistakable flavor of bacon. The bacon they’re using is specifically sugar-free, which many people don’t realize that sugar is added to conventional bacon packs found in stores. Paying attention to the foods that you’re eating is a big part of Paleo, and you want to exert quality control on everything that goes into your body.
On nights I want to guarantee both cooking and cleanup are a total breeze, I lean on recipes that come together with a single pot, pan, or skillet. One-pan is basically kitchen code for "easy" — something you can totally appreciate when you're following a Paleo diet. Since the diet makes eating out and ordering in kind of tricky (although not impossible), it requires a lot of cooking. So why not keep delicious grain- and dairy-free dinners as simple as possible, with one of these 15 recipes that come together in a single pot, pan, or skillet?
In "The Zenbelly Cookbook," Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly dishes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.
Get the taste of Thailand in a turkey burger so you can cut out a lot of the fat that comes with beef. On Paleo you want to mix up the type of meat you’re eating, and turkey makes a great choice. It will still give you protein and a savory flavor, and can be a nice respite from beef. In this burger they have red chilli and ginger being used to try to capture some of the Thai flavor, and they’ve served it open-faced on slice of Paleo bread. The avocado on top is a nice addition, it cools off the spices and adds fiber and potassium.
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I am doing a low carbohydrate (but not totally Paleo) diet. There are a lot of great recipes in this book. I've already made about half a dozen of the meat dishes, several of the veggies and a dessert. The book is well laid out and truly has a wide variety of types of dishes. I've purchased several of these types of cookbooks, and by far this one is the best. Several co-workers have already ordered their own after looking through mine.

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