2013 was a BIG year for Paleo! The movement has really grown, with lots of new blogs and tons of new cookbooks! I know that many of you have decided to give Paleo a try in the new year, so I have made a list of all my favorite cookbooks for you. Having a few Paleo cookbooks on hand is really helpful for staying on track and keeping your meals interesting.
Even though these have been dubbed “finger lickin’” Colonel Sanders has nothing to do with these. That’s because they’re not made with chicken, but with beef. They pack a bit of a kick because of the chipotles used, but not so much that it overpowers the other ingredients. There are plenty of Paleo ingredients used, both in the meatballs, and in the sauce. You’ll find tasty items like coriander seed, garlic, paprika, and bay leaves. You’ll find that the Paleo diet is not very restrictive, it’s just a matter of finding the right mix of spices and seasonings to make the food taste as good as it can.
When it comes to those recipes, a key advantage is the speed. Most options are designed to be fast to make. Likewise, the formatting of the recipes makes it easy to be efficient throughout the process. While the book doesn’t offer images of every recipe, there are more than enough photographs to keep the book interesting and to guide you on your cooking journey.

Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.


Devotees of the paleo diet believe that the way our paleolithic ancestors ate—mostly protein, fat, and fibrous vegetables, and no processed food—is what our bodies are best adapted to metabolize. The paleo diet champions high-quality meats, such as grass-fed beef, and seafood as well as heart good fats and an abundance of produce. Many advocates report higher energy and a greater overall sense of well-being while on the diet. We encourage you to consult your physician or dietitian to determine if paleo is right for you.
This book is particularly geared towards entertaining friends and family with stunning Paleo meals that they might not even know are Paleo. The typical problem presents itself that you want to entertain, but you don’t want to sacrifice your progress by eating a bunch of foods that aren’t Paleo friendly. The answer is to cater your own Paleo approved foods, and this recipe guide shows you how to make foods that everyone will enjoy, regardless of whether or not they share your Paleo philosophy. It has everything from a full dinner party to just a casual get together. Become a master Paleo host with this guide.
I went on Saturday morning and I excitedly told the young girl about finding your blog. The owner was out at the farmers market. I got the chicken salad wrap….delish! I purchases the paleo wraps and can’t wait to make my own this week. I am new paleo….I’ve tried many ways of eating…from raw to lord knows what. I’m 56 in pretty good health but have a bad hip. I need to loose about 20 pounds and want to do it healthfully and have the weight stay off and this be a lifestyle. I’ll be following your blog and maybe I’ll see you at Vive!

In many ways, the most interesting thing about this cookbook isn’t the recipes but the other information that is provided. With this cookbook, the authors strongly focus helping people to transition to the paleo diet and then stick with it in the long-term. This type of information can be particularly useful because the paleo diet is often overwhelming, especially when people first get involved.
The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.
This burger is made with mushroom caps instead of a bun, and it is designed to mimic the flavors of a Philly steak sandwich, only in burger form. It is made from slices of sirloin, so it’s using Green me, and of course has all of the necessary ingredients that go into a Philly steak, such as a bell peppers in multiple colors, and an onion. They’re using lard to fry it all up in, so this is going to be one flavor-filled burger. Cutting out the bread is a facet of Paleo that many followers struggle with, but if you use substitutes like they are here, the process is easier.
Against All Grain - Danielle Walker is the author of this New York Times Bestseller. She has battled autoimmune disease for a very long time using modern-day medicine. This is when she decided to take matters on her own hand by allowing food to be her medicine. She has mastered grain-free, gluten-free and dairy-free cooking which has allowed here to eliminate her ailments. 
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