This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
Eggs are an excellent foundation for paleo breakfasts. Over easy, scrambled, poached, baked, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, made into an omelet—you name it. You can also experiment with paleo pancakes, using protein powder, coconut flour, or almond flour in lieu of white flour (tip: add baking soda and vinegar for a fluffier outcome). Chia puddings, sweet potato "toast," and paleo-friendly smoothies are also fair game.
Tacos can be tricky to make Paleo, but they’ve figured out a good way here by using portobello mushroom caps for the shells. These caps do a good job of holding all of the yummy taco-inspired ingredients, and by the time you finish one of these you’ll feel satisfied, and like you just had Taco Night. The thick texture of the mushrooms means you can pile on the taco toppings and you won’t have to worry about breaking the shell.
This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.
Devotees of the paleo diet believe that the way our paleolithic ancestors ate—mostly protein, fat, and fibrous vegetables, and no processed food—is what our bodies are best adapted to metabolize. The paleo diet champions high-quality meats, such as grass-fed beef, and seafood as well as heart good fats and an abundance of produce. Many advocates report higher energy and a greater overall sense of well-being while on the diet. We encourage you to consult your physician or dietitian to determine if paleo is right for you.

These teriyaki kabobs give you the flavor of teriyaki chicken that you might get from a Japanese restaurant, but in kebab form so they are grilled and have a very distinctive flavor. You’ll notice the attention to detail, like using organic wheat free soy sauce in order to make them. They also recommend using raw organic honey, which will replace the sugar typically found in a teriyaki sauce recipe. There is also fresh ginger used, and garlic, and they recommend free range organic chicken breasts, which should become your new way of buying chicken when on the Paleo diet.

Thanks for the great recipes!! I’m new to your site, but love everything about it! That being said, I was recently diagnosed with Endometriosis. Rather than take pills or have surgery, my midwife has agreed to let me try the Endo Diet, which is very similar to the Paleo Diet, except I can’t have red meats or eggs. Is there a healthy substitute I can use in place of the egg for the mayonnaise?
ROCKRIDGE PRESS is a trusted voice in health and diet publishing a wide variety of lifestyle guides and cookbooks, including The New York Times best seller Paleo for Beginners, The Wicked Good Ketogenic Diet Cookbook, The Mediterranean Diet Plan and the Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker Cookbook. Our authors take pride in publishing thoughtful, well-researched books that help readers make positive lifestyle changes and build permanent healthy habits. Headquartered in Berkeley, California, Rockridge Press is situated in the heart of one of the healthiest regions in the world, the San Francisco Bay Area.
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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