Eggs are an excellent foundation for paleo breakfasts. Over easy, scrambled, poached, baked, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, made into an omelet—you name it. You can also experiment with paleo pancakes, using protein powder, coconut flour, or almond flour in lieu of white flour (tip: add baking soda and vinegar for a fluffier outcome). Chia puddings, sweet potato "toast," and paleo-friendly smoothies are also fair game.
This mackerel recipe uses a pound of fresh mackerel with the skin left on. It is advertised as being served with a magic sauce and without taking any of the magic away we can tell you that it’s made with sherry, honey, some vinegar, and fresh ginger so it’s going to taste incredible, without using any ingredients that will set you back on your progress. On Paleo you may see yourself eating more fish than you used to eat, because it is such a healthy meat, and something our ancestors surely would have eaten. They have it served on a bed of cauli-rice, a rice substitute made from cauliflower.
Our ancestors didn’t have 1,000 recipes from which to choose, so it should be far easier for you to eat Paleo than it was for them. This suite of recipe books is pretty extensive, with hundreds of recipes in different categories like fish, red meats, pork, appetizers, and even organ meats. It’s a way to get a solid grounding on what you should be making for yourself, while at the same time giving you quite the database of recipes to select from. They say these recipes will help you burn fat, perform better cognitively, and even slow down the aging process. These meals can be prepared quickly and easily, so you won’t spend all day in the kitchen.
Get the taste of Thailand in a turkey burger so you can cut out a lot of the fat that comes with beef. On Paleo you want to mix up the type of meat you’re eating, and turkey makes a great choice. It will still give you protein and a savory flavor, and can be a nice respite from beef. In this burger they have red chilli and ginger being used to try to capture some of the Thai flavor, and they’ve served it open-faced on slice of Paleo bread. The avocado on top is a nice addition, it cools off the spices and adds fiber and potassium.
This dish is inspired by Kaldereta, a dish from the Philippines that is generally made with goat shoulders and liverwurst. They’ve replaced the goat shoulders with beef, but they’ve kept the liverwurst which is a good way to incorporate some organ meat into your caveman diet. If you end up liking it there are lots of other recipes you can use it in. The traditional way of making it can be pretty spicy with the use of hot peppers, and here they’re using a red pepper, as well as chile flakes, so it will be a bit spicy, but you can make adjustments to it depending on your personal taste.
I am doing a low carbohydrate (but not totally Paleo) diet. There are a lot of great recipes in this book. I've already made about half a dozen of the meat dishes, several of the veggies and a dessert. The book is well laid out and truly has a wide variety of types of dishes. I've purchased several of these types of cookbooks, and by far this one is the best. Several co-workers have already ordered their own after looking through mine.
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