Grandmas may have spent hours perfecting their versions of meatballs (and we love 'em for it!), but in these busy times, slaving over a stove may not be on the agenda. Expedite your meatball-making with these breadcrumb-free, baked-not-fried pork and beef spheres, drowned in a homemade marinara sauce. You won’t believe it only takes about 30 minutes for the whole thing to come together.
They’ve taken the approach of using meat to replace the crust of the pizza, which cuts out the grains and makes this one meaty pizza pie. The crust is made from Italian sausage, so it’s going to be massively flavorful, and a little spicey. They recommend using a sugar-free pizza sauce, which on Paleo you don’t want to eat any refined sugar, so this is a good recommendation to follow. They’ve made sure to include a bunch of vegetables in this “meatizza” so you are still going to get your nutritional needs met, in addition to all of that meat.

This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
These teriyaki kabobs give you the flavor of teriyaki chicken that you might get from a Japanese restaurant, but in kebab form so they are grilled and have a very distinctive flavor. You’ll notice the attention to detail, like using organic wheat free soy sauce in order to make them. They also recommend using raw organic honey, which will replace the sugar typically found in a teriyaki sauce recipe. There is also fresh ginger used, and garlic, and they recommend free range organic chicken breasts, which should become your new way of buying chicken when on the Paleo diet.
Here are more than 200 recipes you can have at your side as you venture into Paleo and determine what it is you’re supposed to be eating. You can expect leaner muscles while eating these meals, as well as more energy and more mental clarity, all without having to suffer through hunger pangs and cravings like you get with a diet. That’s because they remind you that Paleo isn’t really a diet at all, and with the sort of meals they have you making here you won’t feel like you’re missing out on anything. Quite the opposite, you’ll actually feel like you’re indulging.
1. Crispy Plantains With Garlic Sauce: A staple of Caribbean cuisine, plantains are delicious fried or mashed. Ripe ones look similar to bananas and can be used in sweet dishes, while green ones mash and crisp up nicely. In this recipe, green plantains are parboiled, smashed and pan-fried, so the center remains soft while the edges provide crunch. The accompanying garlic-lime dipping sauce is sinfully delicious. (via Wellfed)
I used to think that I could accomplish all my goals with food. If I ate a certain amount or a certain type of food, I could control everything. That worked for a while until my life started unraveling from ignoring the whole picture. Now I understand the importance of a balanced approach in all areas of life. These wellness articles will allow me to share all the aspects I share to create the life I love.
Sally Jones is a writer and editor living in New York City. She has worked at many websites including iVillage, Ladies Home Journal, More, Parenting, Cosmopolitan, The Knot and YourTango, in jobs ranging from editor to COO. Renovation and interior design are her unhealthy obsessions hobbies. She has renovated every home she's lived in, including the rentals, and like... whoa, who does that? You can catch her at her blog Renov8or.
A “good” lunch food is often defined by its ease of handling. That’s why sandwiches (and pizza slices) make popular midday meals. This recipe is every bit as easy to manage as a sandwich, and far more delicious than some cold meat stuffed between two slices of bread. Portabella mushrooms provide iron, magnesium, and zinc. Two slices of tomato and a few sweet potato chips could provide more than half the recommended intake of vitamin A — people 14 years old and older need an average of 700 to 900 micrograms a day.
These breakfast cups use two primary ingredients that are Paleo friendly: ham and eggs. They make a cup out of the ham so that the egg can rest inside of it. This means you are not getting any additional ingredients to muck things up, and they have kept it very simple. In fact there are only two other ingredients, and one of those is optional. You just add a bit of green onion, and if you feel like it you can put a bit of cheese on. They are using nitrate free ham, so you can tell that there is plenty of attention being given to using quality ingredients.
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.
In many ways, the most interesting thing about this cookbook isn’t the recipes but the other information that is provided. With this cookbook, the authors strongly focus helping people to transition to the paleo diet and then stick with it in the long-term. This type of information can be particularly useful because the paleo diet is often overwhelming, especially when people first get involved.
It was time well spent though. Taking time away from all your devices and things that compete for your time is extremely helpful and allows this space to think that you might not otherwise get. I highly recommend you do this if you can. It doesn't have to be on a beach either – your couch is a perfectly good place to do this, but with the tv off and your phone in another room. (This is also different than meditation. Meditation is trying to achieve the absence of thought, this encourages thought.)
According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.

Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.
I’ve been an athlete since about age 8, and competing—whether it’s with myself or against a field of others—has always been part of my identity. When I found Paleo in 2009, my health and performance improved dramatically. At the time, I was racing mountain bikes and doing triathlons. Then, I became a competitive CrossFitter, most notably participating at the 2013 SoCal Regionals with Team Sea of Green.
I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.

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Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.


I think liver and onions are secretly best friends and the combination even has the potential to make someone love liver. The caramelized onions are very simple to prepare and this recipe doesn’t need anything else to be a complete meal. Liver by itself is so full of nutrients that it could be considered Mother Nature’s multi-vitamin. I enjoyed liver and onions for ages before I learned that the combination is actually a classic in many European countries and is enjoyed all over the world. The ingredient list really couldn’t be shorter.
Joel Runyon is the founder of Ultimate Paleo Guide and CEO of Paleo Meal Plans. He's a precision nutrition, and Gym Jones Level 1 certified, and helped millions of people get healthy and lose weight since 2012. Joel is also an ultra runner and endurance athlete - and in 2017, he became the the youngest person to run an ultra marathon on every continent in the world to build 7 schools with Pencils of Promise in developing countries.Follow him on Twitter, Instagram, Athlinks and read his full bio here.

A new book that just came out will have a lower rating, just because it’s had less time to be rated. Look through the list and find the ones that look good to you and have fun doing it. You can click on the picture or the title and it will take your right to the Amazon website where that particular book is sold. Have fun and enjoy cooking Paleo recipes.


In the end, making a switch to the Paleo diet can ultimately turn your life around and bring you back to your natural and healthy roots. The best part about it is that it's incredibly simple. Although other diets like veganism and vegetarianism are both simple, as well, they lack the added ease of not having to count your calories or other nutrition values.
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
This is the worst cook book I have ever bought. Every recipe I have tried so far has had errors. It will either give a list of ingredients and then fail to tell you what to do with one of them or like the one i am cooking right now...it tells you to roast the chicken at 475 for 25 minutes and then reduce the temperature and continue to cook 45 minutes....ummmm what temp should a person reduce it to? Good thing I consider myself a good cook and know what a whole chicken bakes nicely at. But for some people this could be really frustrating and it is for me when I am in a hurry to make a meal for my family. Buyer beware. Im sure there are better Paleo cookbooks out there.
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