I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.
With over 200 recipes, all Paleo friendly, you know you’re in for a treat with the Caveman Feast. All you need to do to get a feel for the type of quality recipes you’re going to get is check out the ones he’s providing for free at his Civilized Caveman site. You can only imagine that he’s saving the best for this compilation, and to sweeten the deal he’s including a series of bonuses that give you plenty of information right from the top authoritative sources on what’s Paleo and what isn’t. So cut out all of the contradictory information and get down to the real meat, literally and figuratively.
If you’re trying this eating approach, you’ll have to say goodbye not only to foods well known to be unhealthy — such as ice cream, potato chips, and soda — but also all grains (including whole grains), most dairy, legumes (beans), and starchy veggies, among other foods. The thinking goes that foods in these elimination groups are toxic to our bodies because of modern farming practices.
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
Not surprisingly, Paleo for Beginners focuses on teaching people how to get started with a paleo diet. To do this, the author includes information about the diet itself and recommended foods, along with a transition plan, a shopping guide and, of course, the recipes themselves. The information provided isn’t as comprehensive as Practical Paleo, which was discussed earlier. Nevertheless, Paleo for Beginners does achieve its goal well and is effective if you want something a little more concise.
A true labor of love, "Mediterranean Paleo Cooking" is a collaborative effort from nutritionist Caitlin Weeks and her Algerian chef husband, Nabil Boumrar. Together, they explore the flavors of Boumrar's native North Africa, offering an array of gluten-free, Paleo-friendly recipes such as cinnamon-braised beef, almond meatball soup and spicy chicken tagine. Staples like falafel, moussaka, hummus and pita bread are also included, along with multicourse menu plans — providing home cooks with the necessary tools for a Mediterranean-themed dinner party.
Turmeric is known for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties and has been used for a long time in cooking and medicine in India. This PBS post goes into much about the history and benefits of turmeric. Dr. Axe also has a great post about how turmeric can be medicinally better than some drugs on the market. Check it out here. I’m sure that by now you’ve heard that turmeric is good for you and your body and it is great to introduce it into your everyday cooking. It is easy to add it to roasted veggies, smoothies, and also teas. Check out our turmeric maple roasted beets and carrots for another recipe idea!

This book was written by Natalie Perry, a widely known and extremely respected Paleo blogger. This cookbook is massive with more than two hundred recipes that cover all sorts of different Paleo ingredients. Those ingredients include appetizers, snacks, desserts, soups, chilis, meats, seafood, vegetables, and even some staple pantry items. The exclusive recipes included in this cookbook seem to be mostly drawn from Asian, Latin, and Middle Eastern culinary roots.

Kirsty, with animal protein I’m a pretty picky. I buy at butchers where I trust in the quality. In my opinion there is a huge difference in taste and quality when it comes to animal protein. Grains and veggies I’m more lenient but never with animal protein. The cheapest way to get high quality meat is share a whole animal with friends or neighbors. The bacon we eat is from a pig I share with another 2 families. Once a year I get 1/3 and freeze it all. The bacon is incomparable to any grocery store bacon. I’d rather it less often.
However, what sets this book apart is its deep dive into the health benefits of paleo eating. There are meal plans specifically designed to address health problems like hormone imbalances or adrenal problems, as well as in-depth explanations of how food can impact your health. Some reviewers say the health information can get a little confusing, but most agree that it’s extremely helpful for understanding the benefits of paleo eating.

Dyed clothes came into fashion in early Iron Age Legendary Viking town unearthed Organic tools found in Stone Age camp Stone Age cartoons We buy healthier food than in previous generations How agriculture came to Scandinavia Unique find at Viking burial place Immigration in the Viking era Vikings grew barley in Greenland Low carb diets rocked in the Stone Age Denmark’s past viewed from above
Here's a recipe that plays on Thai cuisine’s marriage of sweet and salty flavors, but in a purely paleo, sugar-free way. Microwave for a hot lunch, or enjoy it cold, as you would a meat-based salad. Pork is a fatty meat, although the fat content varies by cut. Be sure to choose a lean cut, which will get you a good amount of protein, as well as vitamin B12, which supports nerve health.
What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.
Sally Jones is a writer and editor living in New York City. She has worked at many websites including iVillage, Ladies Home Journal, More, Parenting, Cosmopolitan, The Knot and YourTango, in jobs ranging from editor to COO. Renovation and interior design are her unhealthy obsessions hobbies. She has renovated every home she's lived in, including the rentals, and like... whoa, who does that? You can catch her at her blog Renov8or.

This sundae is trying to replicate the joy experienced from eating an Almond Joy, without including all of the ingredients they contain that aren’t good for you. Imagine, a guilt-free ice cream treat, that’s what she’s going for here. The chocolate being used is dark chocolate, so already you’re doing better than if you were using milk chocolate. The coconut of course comes from real coconut, but it’s unsweetened coconut flakes so you’re not getting refined sugar, as the sweetness in this sweet treat comes from honey. The almonds add healthy fat and are an essential part of this Almond Joy sundae.
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
Jambalaya can be a very hard recipe to make, which is why it’s good that this uses the slow cooker because you can take out some of that complexity. It’s also a dish that lends itself nicely to Paleo eating because it includes plenty of different meats, as well as a good amount of vegetables. For example there is an entire head of cauliflower added to this, and it helps to balance out all of the sausage and chicken. They make it even easier by using premixed Cajun seasoning, but they also point out that you can use your own if you happen to have some already made.
This Paleo cookbook really is ultimate; the title doesn't lie! Altogether, ten experienced Paleo chefs and bloggers came together to create this amazing, extensive resource for anyone in need of some quality Paleo recipes. There's even an entire chapter dedicated to making the Paleo diet easy with almost eighty fast and simple recipes. There are plenty of great Paleo cookbooks, but this is probably the only one that truly deserves to be called "ultimate." In total, ten popular Paleo bloggers contributed to the creation of this cookbook.

Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
If Indian food is one of your favorite cuisines be sure to try out this fried beef recipe, which gets the Paleo seal of approval. It’s made with hearty chunks of beef stew meat, and has a list of seasonings you may have to go shopping for, but it will be worth it. These include turmeric and garam masala, both of which will act to give it that distinct Indian flavor. The meat is marinated, and then sauteed, with spices and seasonings added to both steps, so you know that this is going to knock your socks off, and the meat will be tender and flavorful.
This book features over 100 different Paleo recipes and if you don’t like a stuffy cookbook, this is the one to go with. It has a humorous style that will keep you smiling while you cook, and makes the process that much more fun. There is a whopping 288 pages for you to explore, so chances are you won’t be short on recipes for any type of meal you’d want to cook up. If you’ve ever wondered how to make your Paleo meals taste as good as possible, or how to maximize the effectiveness of the time you spend in the kitchen, you’ll be happy with the tips, tricks, and ideology of this Paleo chef.
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