Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.
This breakfast casserole is something the whole family can enjoy, even if they are not following Paleo. It’s made with plenty of thick strips of bacon, and it also has parsnips and plenty of eggs in it, with coconut oil being used to cook it up. You’ll find that many breakfast casseroles will incorporate hash browns into the recipe, but potatoes are not allowed on Paleo so you want to avoid these recipes and find alternative ways to get the same effect. In this case they are using parsnips as a replacement to give it the bulk and texture it needs.
Here's a recipe that plays on Thai cuisine’s marriage of sweet and salty flavors, but in a purely paleo, sugar-free way. Microwave for a hot lunch, or enjoy it cold, as you would a meat-based salad. Pork is a fatty meat, although the fat content varies by cut. Be sure to choose a lean cut, which will get you a good amount of protein, as well as vitamin B12, which supports nerve health.
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.
These pork chops are some of the best we’ve seen, and it is through a combination of preparing the pork chop correctly, and topping it with a delicious fruit slaw. When choosing the pork for your pork chops, you want to make sure that you go with an organic brand, rather than conventional. This is true with all of the meat you purchase for Paleo meals because it won’t be loaded with antibiotics, and the animals will have been fed organic feed. For the fruit in this, you’re also going to want to stick with organic peaches, plums, and apricots to avoid chemicals and pesticides.
Those who have been on the Paleo diet also say that once all the refined sugar and dairy are cut from the diet—about two to three months in—their level of energy is noticeably higher than before, so they’re even more motivated to work out and follow a Paleo diet, all part of the lifestyle. The key to success is to start small and build on your success.

The recipes themselves cover many different types of dishes, including breakfast, drinks, snacks, desserts and, of course, main meals. With around 100 recipes in total, there is not a large number of recipes in any given category but that scarcely matters. Instead, the book acts as a great source of paleo recipes, regardless of your preferences for food.
The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body, by Sarah Ballantyne, PhD. This book is billed as a solution for autoimmune diseases, in which the body’s immune system attacks its own cells. In the text, Ballantyne discusses her own struggles with autoimmune disease and helps guide readers on how the paleo diet may help relieve their symptoms, too.

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Feeling full and fulfilled when you’re on a diet may seem impossible, but it’s the only way to turn your diet into a healthy lifestyle. Naturally promoting superior health and weight control, The Paleo Cookbook serves up wholesome recipes from around the world that emphasize lean proteins, vegetables, fruits and healthy fats. A staple for any paleo table, The Paleo Cookbook gives you your fill of a healthy and balanced life with every dish.
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