BUT!  Paleo dinners really can be quick – I promise!   Plus incredibly delicious, kid friendly, comforting, and anything and everything else good home cooked meals can be!  Once you get the hang of timing the cook times of different foods and cooking methods, it becomes a whole lot easier to throw together complete Paleo meals in the time it would take to call for delivery.
This recipe gives you dinner party elegance in a 20-minute dish. We rely on sea bass, a tender, mild-flavored fish with a lovely buttery quality. There are several sustainable options to choose from (Atlantic black sea bass, for one), so ask questions at the fish counter to ensure you're making a responsible choice. You can also use cod, sablefish (also called black cod), striped bass, or barramundi with great results.

A roulade is just a fancy French name for a rolled up food, and in this case they are rolling up a chicken with prosciutto and pesto. That means when you cut the chicken into slices, you’ll get a nice presentation because it will seem like the chicken has been stuffed with the prosciutto and pesto. Pesto is a great way to enhance any meal, and you can make a Paleo friendly version quite easily. They provide a pesto sauce recipe for you to follow. They have cauliflower used as a side dish so you’re getting not only your meat, but also your vegetables.
This is a Fruit Roll-Up knock off that will give you a serving of actual fruit rather than a bunch of artificial ingredients and commercial sweeteners. The cool thing is she uses three different types of fruit in these, with apples, strawberries, and grapefruit making an appearance. Making it look like a strip of leather is easier than you think, and she walks you through the steps so you can make it look appetizing. And they’re great for kid’s lunches as well, so you can feel good about what they are snacking on.

The Big Book of Paleo Slow Cooking: 200 Nourishing Recipes That Cook Carefree, for Everyday Dinners and Weekend Feasts contains a variety of recipes—everything from quick, easy weeknight meals to more complicated dishes to prepare on weekends or holidays. The meals incorporate international flavors, all while using common ingredients. There’s also a pantry stocking section that will help you stock up on paleo-approved ingredients.
The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.
Dried Fruit Bars Bite-Sized Raspberry Popsicles Apple and Almond Butter Bites Acorn Squash with Walnuts & Cranberries Valentine’s Day Smoothie Bacon-Wrapped Avocado Baked Apple Chips Granola Bars Pumpkin Pie Smoothie Apple cinnamon fruit rolls Chocolate nut granola Morning Paleo smoothie Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds Grilled peaches with Prosciutto and Basil Paleo Snacks Kale chips Raspberry-Lime Fruit Dip Chocolate Strawberry Hearts Banana Raisin Cookies Chunky Fruit Popsicles Bite-sized chocolate treats Broiled Grapefruit Fruit Pudding Fried Honey Banana
This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
Here’s another complete paleo meal in one “container.” The red bell peppers get cooked to mellow sweetness, but still hold their shape enough to keep other delicious ingredients inside. This recipe, with its peppers and tomatoes, is a great source of vitamins A and C, even after the vitamin loss that cooking causes. It’s also a good source of protein (4 ounces of lean turkey has over 20 grams).
I had planned on photographing a bunch of the recipes myself, but there's been little time since we moved plus the food goes too fast around here! So here are some of my favorite recipes in the book, using George's photos. Everything we've ever tried from the Civilized Caveman has been incredible and this book is no different. My Eggs Benedict over Savory Waffles is also included in the book so make sure to look for it! You'll also get a bonus package of all of his best pumpkin recipes for Halloween and Thanksgiving. Plus he backs your purchase with a 60-day money back guarantee in case you're not satisfied. You never find that in the ebook world and I think that's incredibly generous!
The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.
1. Crispy Plantains With Garlic Sauce: A staple of Caribbean cuisine, plantains are delicious fried or mashed. Ripe ones look similar to bananas and can be used in sweet dishes, while green ones mash and crisp up nicely. In this recipe, green plantains are parboiled, smashed and pan-fried, so the center remains soft while the edges provide crunch. The accompanying garlic-lime dipping sauce is sinfully delicious. (via Wellfed)
Turmeric is known for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties and has been used for a long time in cooking and medicine in India. This PBS post goes into much about the history and benefits of turmeric. Dr. Axe also has a great post about how turmeric can be medicinally better than some drugs on the market. Check it out here. I’m sure that by now you’ve heard that turmeric is good for you and your body and it is great to introduce it into your everyday cooking. It is easy to add it to roasted veggies, smoothies, and also teas. Check out our turmeric maple roasted beets and carrots for another recipe idea!
Slow Cooked Garlic Artichokes Sautéed Swiss Chard With Bacon Sautéed Garlic Broccolini Grilled Balsamic Glazed Portobello Mushrooms Garlic Green Beans Roasted Mushrooms With Thyme Vegetables in a Creamy Pesto Sauce Spaghetti Squash with Creamy Mushroom Sauce Jalapeno Poppers Creamy Garlic Mushrooms Apple and Vegetable Stir-Fry Mini Pepperoni Pizza Bites Brussels Sprouts With Balsamic and Cranberries Sausage-Stuffed Jalapeño Bites Sweet Potato Bacon Cakes Creamed Spinach Mini Hamburger Bites Oven Roasted Garlic Cabbage Spicy Sweet Potato Wedges Cauliflower Tortillas Sweet Potato Bites with Guacamole and Bacon Zucchini cakes Roasted cauliflower with mint and pomegranate BLT Endive Bites Bell Pepper Pizza Bites Cauliflower and Bacon Hash Pesto Stuffed Mushrooms Oven Fried Pickles
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
These teriyaki kabobs give you the flavor of teriyaki chicken that you might get from a Japanese restaurant, but in kebab form so they are grilled and have a very distinctive flavor. You’ll notice the attention to detail, like using organic wheat free soy sauce in order to make them. They also recommend using raw organic honey, which will replace the sugar typically found in a teriyaki sauce recipe. There is also fresh ginger used, and garlic, and they recommend free range organic chicken breasts, which should become your new way of buying chicken when on the Paleo diet.
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.
Skillet meals are always nice to make because they generally keep things contained to one pan. In this recipe she’s put together a nice mix of grass-fed ground beef, zucchini, and other supporting ingredients which turns out to be one of the best Paleo beef recipes we’ve discovered. The key is its simplicity, which allows you to enjoy the naturally flavor of the beef, while still getting your vegetables. Tomatoes are used as well, which help the body in many ways, most importantly with their lycopene content. Did you know that by cooking the tomatoes, you’re getting plenty more lycopene than from raw tomatoes?

Here's a recipe that plays on Thai cuisine’s marriage of sweet and salty flavors, but in a purely paleo, sugar-free way. Microwave for a hot lunch, or enjoy it cold, as you would a meat-based salad. Pork is a fatty meat, although the fat content varies by cut. Be sure to choose a lean cut, which will get you a good amount of protein, as well as vitamin B12, which supports nerve health.
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
So glad you commented! I get so excited when I see other local people making healthy lifestyle changes. Making a change as a family is a great way to motivate each other. My dad was a major reason I went Paleo, and we keep each other on track in all aspects of health! About your question, this mayo is definitely tastier and healthier than store bought mayo. I absolutely despise regular mayo, and I love this recipe. If you aren’t a big fan of chicken salad, this might not be the first recipe to start; although the flavor is pretty mild. You can find more in the recipe index though. And yes about Vive! It’s honestly my favorite food place in Mandeville area. The lunch is delicious and they have a restaurant upstairs called Opal Basil. The food is divine!! Feel free to ask any more questions. Good luck in nursing school! 

We get it. Being a mom is full-on and full-time. Equal parts FUN and WTF. Our kids don’t come with instructions, and it’s ok if we don’t have all the answers. We’ll figure it out together. The best advice comes from our favorite experts and doctors, trusted mom friends, and learning on the job. Get your coffee — or wine! — and tune in to hear us spill it all. We got this. This is MOM BRAIN with Hilaria Baldwin and Daphne Oz.

One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.
The first edition of this popular paleo cookbook sold more than half a million copies, and the new second edition contains even more helpful information. There are more than 150 paleo recipes in Practical Paleo, including 40 new ones. You’ll also find a section on getting started with the paleo lifestyle, as well as tips on how to navigate social outings and holidays with a restricted diet.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
Shepherd’s pie is a popular dish in the UK, but not so much in the States. It’s a shame because it’s very delicious, but it is also made with a lot of ingredients that aren’t necessarily Paleo if it’s made the traditional way. This recipe makes plenty of adjustments so that a Paleo eater can enjoy comforting food. For starters they’ve gotten rid of white potatoes that play such a big role, and replace them with sweet potatoes which are a recommended Paleo food because they are loaded with antioxidants and fiber. The other ingredients all fall well within your Paleo guidelines, so you can eat until satisfied.

Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
So about the recipe… You have to buy the Paleo wraps online or if you’re from my area (Mandeville, Louisiana), my friend at Vive sells them. I’m not always a huge fan of buying Paleo products, but 1) these are only made of coconut, so they’re super healthy and 2) these are SO good and will give you so many new options for lunch. After you buy the wraps, make the chicken salad and use a Paleo mayo recipe. Do not get lazy about the Paleo mayo and buy store-bought; the Paleo mayo is much better. Mayo can be tough if you don’t follow directions. Happy lunch-making! Share with me in the comments your opinion on this recipe. 
I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.
Kelly is such a talented photographer. Her book makes me want to eat the food right off the page. Equally as good as the photography are her recipes. Kelly incorporates chocolate into each recipe so thoughtfully that we cooked from it all week and didn’t feel chocolated-out! The book is packed with delicious recipes for treats, but it also has a handful of savory recipes with a chocolate twist. If you enjoy chocolate even half as much as I do, then this book is a must-have!

Description: ‘The Ketogenic Diet’ is a complete resource for anyone interested in low-carbohydrate diets (such as the Atkins Diet, Protein Power, Bodyopus or the Anabolic Diet). It looks objectively at the physiology behind such diets, including potential negative effects, and gives specific recommendations on how to optimize such a diet assuming an individual has chosen to do one. Two modified ketogenic diets (which involve the insertion of carbohydrates to sustain exercise performance) are also discussed in detail, along with specific guidelines. Exercise is discussed in great detail, including background physiology, the effects of exercise on fat loss, exercise guidelines and sample workouts. A great deal of basic physiology information, dealing with both nutrition and exercise topics, is included so that readers without a technical background will be able to understand the topics discussed.
Shakshuka, a traditional Israeli breakfast food, is a skillet of spiced tomatoes, peppers, and onions with baked eggs. In this version, we swapped out our trusted cast-iron skillet for the walls of a spaghetti squash boat to create a paleo-friendly morning meal. Spaghetti squash adds a creamy texture and sweet flavor to this low-carb spin on a breakfast hash. Sprinkled with fresh cilantro, this hearty breakfast option is perfect for a brunch crowd or a lazy weekend morning in bed.
The Big Book of Paleo Slow Cooking: 200 Nourishing Recipes That Cook Carefree, for Everyday Dinners and Weekend Feasts contains a variety of recipes—everything from quick, easy weeknight meals to more complicated dishes to prepare on weekends or holidays. The meals incorporate international flavors, all while using common ingredients. There’s also a pantry stocking section that will help you stock up on paleo-approved ingredients.
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