Introducing paleo food to a family can be tough, especially as many people are resistant to the idea. As a result, this cookbook offers one potential way around the problem, by focusing on recipes that aren’t obviously paleo. The meals would also work well for many families because they don’t use incredibly obscure ingredients and often don’t have as many steps as other paleo recipes.
Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.

A “good” lunch food is often defined by its ease of handling. That’s why sandwiches (and pizza slices) make popular midday meals. This recipe is every bit as easy to manage as a sandwich, and far more delicious than some cold meat stuffed between two slices of bread. Portabella mushrooms provide iron, magnesium, and zinc. Two slices of tomato and a few sweet potato chips could provide more than half the recommended intake of vitamin A — people 14 years old and older need an average of 700 to 900 micrograms a day.

You can usually find flank steak on sale at the local grocery store, just make sure that you’re getting a high quality version that is organic, or grass fed. She’s provided a way to take this cut of meat and turn it into something special that’s marinated in citrus juices so it’ll come out very tender and juicy. She’s using the juice of an orange and a couple of limes for the marinade, and there are also some additional ingredients used like olive oil, chili powder, and cilantro. Notice how she’s paired this with a side of mixed vegetables which is a big facet of Paleo eating.


This book features over 100 different Paleo recipes and if you don’t like a stuffy cookbook, this is the one to go with. It has a humorous style that will keep you smiling while you cook, and makes the process that much more fun. There is a whopping 288 pages for you to explore, so chances are you won’t be short on recipes for any type of meal you’d want to cook up. If you’ve ever wondered how to make your Paleo meals taste as good as possible, or how to maximize the effectiveness of the time you spend in the kitchen, you’ll be happy with the tips, tricks, and ideology of this Paleo chef.
I just found your blog. I will be checking back frequently in the future. I bought these wraps a long time ago and they are still sitting in my pantry. I make chicken salad almost weekly…I will have to try them in the wraps soon!!! Just a tip I am so thankful to have discovered. Paleo mayo becomes 30 secs in the making and SUPER EASY if you have an immersion blender! It was well worth my $15!! Just put all the ingredients you listed including the oil in a large mouth pint and a half mason jar put the blender to the bottom and blend! There is a video online somewhere. It is the original recipe I found and that blogger took a video of making it. A real time saver!!
"Paleo Home Cooking" caters to gluten-free newbies and veterans alike. Author Sonia Lacasse clearly lays out which foods you'll target, which you may occasionally indulge in and which you must "absolutely, positively stay away from." Among its 150 delectable recipes are homemade nut butters, naturally sweetened desserts, salads to last all week and scrumptious seafood and meat dishes, such as Hearty Meatballs in Wild Mushroom Sauce or Paleo Moussaka with creamy eggplant, spicy lamb and béchamel sauce.

Here’s another complete paleo meal in one “container.” The red bell peppers get cooked to mellow sweetness, but still hold their shape enough to keep other delicious ingredients inside. This recipe, with its peppers and tomatoes, is a great source of vitamins A and C, even after the vitamin loss that cooking causes. It’s also a good source of protein (4 ounces of lean turkey has over 20 grams).
What sort of stuff is in the book? This book is centered around the 100+ amazing recipes I’ve developed for you. It’s got seven fueling strategies (when training falls at different times during the day), and fifty meal combinations (think of it like the beginnings of a meal plan). The macros for each recipe are provided. This book discusses performance nutrition in a limited manner, so if you’re after the detailed rationale behind why Paleo is awesome for athletes, I recommend also picking up my ebook, The Paleo Athlete.
The recipes are incredible and the photography is gorgeous. I love how this book  is organized in menus, and each menu gives you tips on how to prepare for the party efficiently. My other favorite part of this book is that most of the recipes use simple, fresh ingredients.  If you are already a real-foodie, you likely have most of the ingredients on hand.CLICK HERE to order Gather.

You can eat well and never worry about feeling deprived because this great cookbook offers creative meal ideas for even the pickiest of eaters.  Cravings are taken care of easily and time convenience is certainly gained with several weeknight meals included.  Everyone receives pre-made shopping lists to make the next grocery trip more convenient and productive.
When it comes to pizza on Paleo, you have a few different options. You can use one of these Paleo friendly pizza recipes, or you can make something like this pizza pie casserole. It has all the flavors that you want from a pizza, but without the crust that usually gets a Paleo eater into trouble. The bottom layer is made up entirely of ground beef, and then they put a vegetable crust over the top of the meat layer, making it a balanced Paleo meal by giving you your vegetables. The cheese on the top is optional, so use your best judgment on this and opt out of it if you know you can’t handle cheese.
Junk food and takeout tend to have a strong hold over people, even when they’re attempting to eat healthily. This cookbook attempts to tackle that problem by introducing a range of different paleo dishes that are variations on common takeout meals. This includes recipes from many different cultures, including Indian, Mexican, Greek and American meals.
Yes, the egg is raw, and raw egg is perfectly safe to consume, so long as you trust the source of your eggs. Anything you buy from a grocery store should be set, and if you get them from the Farmer’s Market or grow your own, just make sure you wash the shell VERY WELL before using raw egg, as this is where most of the contaminate comes from. (The shell isn’t sterile, you crack the egg, the shell contacts the egg and leaves some salmonella behind, the egg is now unsafe)
You might have heard about the paleo diet by now — a way to eat based on how our hunter-gatherer ancestors (read: cavemen) did it back in the day. While going paleo eliminates some tasty modern options like breads, pastas, and other grains, along with legumes, dairy, and soy, it emphasizes other delectable, whole foods that provide various health benefits.
Most tacos come in a corn tortilla, but these paleo tacos are wrapped in a crisp lettuce leaf. Serve them as an easily packed lunch “sandwich” or as cocktail hour finger food. A 3-ounce serving of skirt steak provides almost half a milligram of vitamin B6, nearly 40 percent of your daily need. People with poor kidney function or with malabsorption conditions like celiac disease especially need to be sure they’re getting enough B6.
Description: Low-fat or low-carb? A recent New York Times Magazine (July 7, 2002) cover story answered this question and said that Dr. Atkins was right all along, “its not fat that makes us fat but carbohydrates.” Though the government has spent hundreds of millions of dollars in research trying to prove that fat is the cause of obesity, there has been a subtle shift in the scientific consensus over the past five years supporting what the low-carb diet doctors have been saying all along: if we eat less carbohydrates, we will lose weight and live longer.
There's no one "right way" to do paleo. If you're just starting out, it may take some time to figure out what feels best. Maybe you just eat paleo after 2 p.m. on weekdays; maybe you are so hardcore, you get uneasy just looking at a slice of bread. Most of us fall somewhere in between. We're advocates of a more generally "paleo-based" system, following paleo principles most of the time, but making reasonable exceptions for important events or your mom's famous chocolate chip cookies.

The cover for this cookbook may make it seem fairly unappealing. But, as is often the case, that concept isn’t accurate at all. Instead, Nom Nom Paleo is a very popular paleo cookbook, with more than 100 different recipes on offer. Unusually, the cookbook has considerably more images than recipes, meaning you get amazing visual instructions of the entire cooking process.


One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
2013 was a BIG year for Paleo! The movement has really grown, with lots of new blogs and tons of new cookbooks! I know that many of you have decided to give Paleo a try in the new year, so I have made a list of all my favorite cookbooks for you. Having a few Paleo cookbooks on hand is really helpful for staying on track and keeping your meals interesting.

This is hands down the best Paleo recipe guide you can get for the money, and there isn’t even a close second. It has over 350 recipes that show you how to cook with all of the wholesome foods you should be eating, and deftly avoids all of the junk that mucks up your system and makes you sluggish and fat. It’s laid out in such a manner that you can clearly see what you’ll need, and how to make it. There’s even an 8 week autopilot meal plan that takes out all of the guesswork to make this caveman simple to follow.
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