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When it comes to those recipes, a key advantage is the speed. Most options are designed to be fast to make. Likewise, the formatting of the recipes makes it easy to be efficient throughout the process. While the book doesn’t offer images of every recipe, there are more than enough photographs to keep the book interesting and to guide you on your cooking journey.
2013 was a BIG year for Paleo! The movement has really grown, with lots of new blogs and tons of new cookbooks! I know that many of you have decided to give Paleo a try in the new year, so I have made a list of all my favorite cookbooks for you. Having a few Paleo cookbooks on hand is really helpful for staying on track and keeping your meals interesting.
Feeling full and fulfilled when you’re on a diet may seem impossible, but it’s the only way to turn your diet into a healthy lifestyle. Naturally promoting superior health and weight control, The Paleo Cookbook serves up wholesome recipes from around the world that emphasize lean proteins, vegetables, fruits and healthy fats. A staple for any paleo table, The Paleo Cookbook gives you your fill of a healthy and balanced life with every dish.
A “good” lunch food is often defined by its ease of handling. That’s why sandwiches (and pizza slices) make popular midday meals. This recipe is every bit as easy to manage as a sandwich, and far more delicious than some cold meat stuffed between two slices of bread. Portabella mushrooms provide iron, magnesium, and zinc. Two slices of tomato and a few sweet potato chips could provide more than half the recommended intake of vitamin A — people 14 years old and older need an average of 700 to 900 micrograms a day.

This sundae is trying to replicate the joy experienced from eating an Almond Joy, without including all of the ingredients they contain that aren’t good for you. Imagine, a guilt-free ice cream treat, that’s what she’s going for here. The chocolate being used is dark chocolate, so already you’re doing better than if you were using milk chocolate. The coconut of course comes from real coconut, but it’s unsweetened coconut flakes so you’re not getting refined sugar, as the sweetness in this sweet treat comes from honey. The almonds add healthy fat and are an essential part of this Almond Joy sundae.
Cookie bars are like cookies, but they’re thicker and have more of the good stuff per square inch because of their size and shape. That means you’re getting the cookie experience you’re craving, but in a handy bar form that will leave you more satisfied. These bars are in the style of chocolate chip, quite possibly the most popular cookie choice in America. The only thing is you won’t want to dunk these in a glass of cow’s milk, but you can feel free to have almond milk with them, and they actually contain almond milk as well.
Hi Monica! I love your site! I’m 22 years old and also from Mandeville, LA! I’m looking into healthier eating ideas so I can help my parents and myself lose some unwanted pounds! They are very hard to motivate to eat healthier and I think the best way to help them would be to cook for them. (I’m in nursing school at LSU and living at home so I think this is the best time to help them with a much needed change)! I’m not a big fan of mayo but I was wondering if this Paleo version was healthier/tastier than regular store bought mayo? Or if you had any other ideas for things I could replace mayo with for this recipe? I’m going to have to go to Vive soon! I’ve seen it a million times and have never stopped in! Thanks so much!!

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Skillet meals are always nice to make because they generally keep things contained to one pan. In this recipe she’s put together a nice mix of grass-fed ground beef, zucchini, and other supporting ingredients which turns out to be one of the best Paleo beef recipes we’ve discovered. The key is its simplicity, which allows you to enjoy the naturally flavor of the beef, while still getting your vegetables. Tomatoes are used as well, which help the body in many ways, most importantly with their lycopene content. Did you know that by cooking the tomatoes, you’re getting plenty more lycopene than from raw tomatoes?

This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.

One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
When you only want dessert for one a cake is too much, which is why Kiri came up with a way to make a chocolate cake in a mug, using only Paleo ingredients. This comes out moist and fluffy, just like you’d expect from a cake. The other thing you’ll really love about this is she’s whittled it down to the fastest and easiest steps possible. You just toss all of the ingredients in to a mug, mix, microwave, and enjoy. This goes great with a Paleo ice cream, so it’s true that you can really have your Paleo cake and eat it too, without feeling lousy or regretful afterward.
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Jambalaya can be a very hard recipe to make, which is why it’s good that this uses the slow cooker because you can take out some of that complexity. It’s also a dish that lends itself nicely to Paleo eating because it includes plenty of different meats, as well as a good amount of vegetables. For example there is an entire head of cauliflower added to this, and it helps to balance out all of the sausage and chicken. They make it even easier by using premixed Cajun seasoning, but they also point out that you can use your own if you happen to have some already made.
For busy commuters, it is easy to get in the rut of eating hard boiled eggs every morning.  This book will help you keep both your breakfasts and lunches exciting, even with a busy work schedule. The recipes are not only delicious and healthy, they are easy to make. In addition, Diana is a nutritional therapist and offers the reader tons of practical tips on how to follow a Paleo diet, including a guide for eating out!
I don't know about you, but I rely on blogs and cookbooks for advice when I'm trying to cook healthier—in fact, this recipe a friend sent me for a Paleo breakfast casserole basically got me through my Whole 30 (I never even got sick of it). Having meal inspo at the ready is key to sticking to your goals, and we just so happen to have found the best Paleo cookbooks out there. In case you aren't familiar with the Paleo diet, people associate it with eating like a caveman—you basically consume a lot of protein, fresh veggies, and good fat while saying goodbye to processed foods and most sugars.
These breakfast cups use two primary ingredients that are Paleo friendly: ham and eggs. They make a cup out of the ham so that the egg can rest inside of it. This means you are not getting any additional ingredients to muck things up, and they have kept it very simple. In fact there are only two other ingredients, and one of those is optional. You just add a bit of green onion, and if you feel like it you can put a bit of cheese on. They are using nitrate free ham, so you can tell that there is plenty of attention being given to using quality ingredients.
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
One of the best features of this book is that it has pairing and variations of ingredients that you can use. And if you're going Paleo, sometimes it can be hard to pick what ingredients are Paleo "compatible" that are available on your cupboard or available in a local grocery near you. The meals are easy to prepare and delicious. This book emphasizes on meal planning and preparation which helps you save a lot of time.​
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