Brandi currently lives in Kansas City, Missouri and is a self-taught cook and fitness enthusiast. She has focused on healthy recipe development and exercise for 5+ years after reaching a fitness plateau and struggling to lose weight and maintain body goals. Brandi’s goal is to share recipes and workouts that support a consistently healthy lifestyle.
Practical Paleo is more than just a recipe book. Instead, the book acts as a particularly effective introduction to the paleo diet, offering information and steps about what you can expect from the beginning all the way through. Some of this information may even be new to people who have been following paleo for a while, especially as there is a discussion about gut bacteria and various ways to live a paleo lifestyle effectively.
You’ll get over 120 recipes in this highly rated book that shows you how to cook up Paleo food for you as well as your family. If you’ve ever wanted a “diet” where you don’t have to count calories, or eat specially labeled diet foods, Paleo is the way to go and this book is the way to get started. It has information that has been peer reviewed and time tested and is sure to teach you at least something about Paleo that you didn’t know. The recipes are laid out in a manner that is easy to follow, so you’ll be sure to stick with it and learn the right way to do things.

This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
A chicken salad sandwich sounds great for lunch, but the sandwich part is out of the question if you’re eating paleo. This recipe for a healthy alternative adds a fiber boost in the form of diced vegetables, like radishes and cabbage. If you pack along four or five large butter lettuce leaves, you can leave your fork at home and scoop up the chicken with them.
Get the taste of Thailand in a turkey burger so you can cut out a lot of the fat that comes with beef. On Paleo you want to mix up the type of meat you’re eating, and turkey makes a great choice. It will still give you protein and a savory flavor, and can be a nice respite from beef. In this burger they have red chilli and ginger being used to try to capture some of the Thai flavor, and they’ve served it open-faced on slice of Paleo bread. The avocado on top is a nice addition, it cools off the spices and adds fiber and potassium.
This meatloaf is billed as being packed with plenty of pork flavor, and that’s because they’re using bacon to top things off. What most people don’t understand is that Paleo is equal parts meat and vegetables, even though this meatloaf has a bacon topping, it is also packed with a pound of spinach. The 50/50 ratio of meat to vegetables is important to help your digestive system process all the meat, and to stick to a hunter-gatherer ratio. If it was a meat-centric diet it wouldn’t be very healthy, and it wouldn’t be in line with what our ancestors were eating in the Stone Age.
As the name suggests, this paleo cookbook specifically targets people who are training while also on the paleo diet. This could include many different groups of people, including those who participate in sports, bodybuilders and individuals who simply want to increase their muscle mass. The overall style works well, especially for people who are already interested in performance but are new to paleo.

Dyed clothes came into fashion in early Iron Age Legendary Viking town unearthed Organic tools found in Stone Age camp Stone Age cartoons We buy healthier food than in previous generations How agriculture came to Scandinavia Unique find at Viking burial place Immigration in the Viking era Vikings grew barley in Greenland Low carb diets rocked in the Stone Age Denmark’s past viewed from above
If Indian food is one of your favorite cuisines be sure to try out this fried beef recipe, which gets the Paleo seal of approval. It’s made with hearty chunks of beef stew meat, and has a list of seasonings you may have to go shopping for, but it will be worth it. These include turmeric and garam masala, both of which will act to give it that distinct Indian flavor. The meat is marinated, and then sauteed, with spices and seasonings added to both steps, so you know that this is going to knock your socks off, and the meat will be tender and flavorful.
Cajun seasoning is always going to do a great job of adding spice and some heat to a meal, and in this recipe they provide you with the steps to make your own Cajun seasoning mix from scratch. Be sure to make a big batch of it so you can store it and have it on hand for more Cajun style cooking in the future. Once you have the Cajun burgers in place it’s time to top them off with some caramelized onions. This is served up without a bun, and on a bed of creamed spinach, and she provides a nice creamed spinach recipe that doesn’t use any dairy, but uses coconut milk instead.
Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.
This recipe is inspired by Indochina cuisine and features chilli chicken that gets marinated in a special blend of spices. The red chillies are going to give this a pretty good spiciness to this dish, so if you don’t like spicy foods you may want to pass on this one, or make adjustments to the peppers, using ones that aren’t as potent. It’s served on a bed of cauliflower rice to keep it Paleo friendly. You’ll find that cauliflower is a versatile way to make rice and couscous replacements, and it satisfies your vegetable requirement.
Perhaps you know this by the French name mille-feuille, but it also goes by Napoleon. Following a traditional mille-feuille recipe will get you into trouble on Paleo because of all the puff pastry and pastry cream that is used. Here they’ve made a faux version, and they’ve made it Paleo friendly so you won’t have to feel bad about eating it. The puff pastry has been replaced with almond flour, so no concerns about wheat or grains, and the filling is made with no dairy, using only ingredients commonly found in Paleo cooking and baking recipes.
The recipes are hands down, amazing. Every Paleo foodie needs this book on their shelf. The skill level seems to range from simple to intermediate. There are some recipes that you can whip up for a weeknight meal and many others that you can impress dinner guests with. Many of the recipes are ethnic-inspired and they all burst with flavor. When reading this book, it feels like you are hanging out with Michelle and her family learning directly from them about how to eat like a real-food-foodie!
Get into the habit of buying a butternut squash whenever you’re at the store. They’re so versatile and able to be used in so many ways, that you’ll have no trouble finding a Paleo friendly recipe to use it in. Here she’ll show you exactly how to take that big bulky squash and tame it so it becomes a tasty soup. If you’ve always avoided these types of squash because you didn’t know how to prepare it, now’s your chance to learn how, and it will be a skill you can use again and again when eating on the Paleo plan.
If you love Mediterranean food as much as I do, then you need this book. The recipes are delectable, hardy, yet simple to make. Caitlin’s husband, Nabil co-wrote this book with her. He is a classically trained chef and you will find his chef’s tips included all through out the book. Caitlin is a Paleo oriented holistic nutritionist. You will also find a shopping list, a healthy food buying guide and nutrition tips form her all throughout the book. Read my full review here.
"Paleo Home Cooking" caters to gluten-free newbies and veterans alike. Author Sonia Lacasse clearly lays out which foods you'll target, which you may occasionally indulge in and which you must "absolutely, positively stay away from." Among its 150 delectable recipes are homemade nut butters, naturally sweetened desserts, salads to last all week and scrumptious seafood and meat dishes, such as Hearty Meatballs in Wild Mushroom Sauce or Paleo Moussaka with creamy eggplant, spicy lamb and béchamel sauce.
Wondering what to eat on the Paleo diet? Explore PaleoPlan’s 450+ easy and delicious Paleo recipes—all absolutely free! Our recipes are a fast and healthy way to lose weight, feel better, and get in shape on the Paleo diet. From breakfast to dinner, we have a variety of meals for every occasion. With so many amazing recipe options to choose from, you’re sure to find a delicious, satisfying, and 100% Paleo diet meal that’s perfect for you, your family and friends.
At first, the title may seem like a paradox – chocolate and Paleo don’t always go hand in hand, but this book is a compilation of 80 mostly-healthy dessert recipes that are grain and dairy free. Certainly, any kind of treat should not be a daily indulgence, but for special occasions and gatherings, the recipe in The Paleo Chocolate Lovers Cookbook look delicious. I made the chocolate cupcakes with cookie dough frosting for a party recently and they were definitely a hit. Other recipes include:
These stuffed peppers are using sweet peppers so they are not spicy, and they are stuffed with goat cheese, which does not contain as much lactose as cheese made from cow’s milk. They say that you can use a different cheese if you do not like goat cheese, and with the cheese question you’re going to have to come up with your own answer as to which kind you are going to use while you are eating Paleo. If your body responds well to eating cheese, you’ll be able to have it more often than someone that can’t process it.

Description: Now, whether you are a curious healthcare professional or just a connoisseur of diet information, two New York Times best-selling authors provide you with the definitive resource for low carbohydrate living. Doctors Volek and Phinney share over 50 years of clinical experience using low carbohydrate diets, and together they have published more than 200 research papers and chapters on the topic. Particularly in the last decade, much has been learned about the risks associated with insulin resistance (including but not limited to metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type-2 diabetes), and how this condition is far better controlled by carbohydrate restriction than with drugs.


Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
Meatloaf is one food you don’t have to give up while following the Paleo diet. The great thing about meatloaf is everyone usually likes it enough to make it a regular menu item. In this version it has been miniaturized so that you don’t end up making one big loaf, but rather individual-sized portions so that everyone gets a nice outer crust, and it avoids the problem of soggy or crustless middle section pieces. You’ll notice that the breadcrumbs have been done away with as they aren’t allowed on the Paleo diet. You won’t notice they’re gone because there’s coconut flour instead.
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
This Paleo diet recipe has a traditional Italian feel to it thanks to the use of Italian sausage and the spices it is packed with. It then takes it one step further with pesto, an item that you can make on your own following a Paleo friendly pesto recipe. There are also plenty of nourishing foods like baby spinach, and tomatoes, so you’re getting a fair amount of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. You can easily omit the mozzarella if you’re nixing all cheese per the official Paleo stance on cheese, but these are fresh mozzarella balls, and you may find they’re easier to digest.

Say hello to paleo and goodbye to stuffed sandwiches, right? Not so fast. Here’s an Italian roll-up with everything you love about a footlong. Vary the amount of greens in the middle of the roll as much as you like — the more you use, the more fiber. Substitute traditional mayo for the paleo-friendly version included in this recipe, or try pesto or hummus.


I there, I’m cooking for my friend who has secondary cancer and has strict guidelines on what she can eat. She told me that it’s pretty much Paleo how she been advice to eat. Anyway my question is… On title of this list is a picture of raspberries in the jar with something? I want that recipe pretty please? I think she will be able to eat that as it doesn’t have almond meal or anything like that. Thanks in advance.
As the name suggests, this paleo cookbook specifically targets people who are training while also on the paleo diet. This could include many different groups of people, including those who participate in sports, bodybuilders and individuals who simply want to increase their muscle mass. The overall style works well, especially for people who are already interested in performance but are new to paleo.

Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.
This recipe is inspired by Indochina cuisine and features chilli chicken that gets marinated in a special blend of spices. The red chillies are going to give this a pretty good spiciness to this dish, so if you don’t like spicy foods you may want to pass on this one, or make adjustments to the peppers, using ones that aren’t as potent. It’s served on a bed of cauliflower rice to keep it Paleo friendly. You’ll find that cauliflower is a versatile way to make rice and couscous replacements, and it satisfies your vegetable requirement.
The chicken. The green sauce. The homemade sriracha. Some of Michelle Tam's recipes are a little more difficult than I like to attempt during a Whole30 (I prefer to keep it simple), but others are in heavy rotation (especially the green chicken and the Peruvian chicken). The Nom Nom app is amazing too — totally worth the price. You can also pre-order Michelle's next book, Ready or Not!, which is coming out in August 2017. Buy it here.
The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.

How does pre-order work? If you order now, ahead of the January 6 release date, you’ll enjoy 25% savings off the cover price. Early bird gets the worm here! Then, when the book is finally released, it’ll be automatically shipped to you. Bonus: Usually pre-ordered books arrive a few days before the actual release date, though that isn’t a promise. Pre-orders are handled through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, Google Play or IndieBound.
Butternut squash is great for you, kale is fantastic for you, so in this recipe you’re already starting off on the right foot. Next, add in some beef and you’re doing just dandy in regards to Paleo eating. That’s because you’re getting plenty of nutrition from the kale and squash, as well as the requisite protein from the beef, so you’ll feel satiated at the end of the bowl, and this is a stew that eats like a meal because it is a meal, it just happens to be in a bowl. You brown the meat in bacon fat, giving it wild amounts of flavor.
Thanks for the great recipes!! I’m new to your site, but love everything about it! That being said, I was recently diagnosed with Endometriosis. Rather than take pills or have surgery, my midwife has agreed to let me try the Endo Diet, which is very similar to the Paleo Diet, except I can’t have red meats or eggs. Is there a healthy substitute I can use in place of the egg for the mayonnaise?
These gummy orange slices are really great because they don’t use any sugar, but they come out just like a piece of gummy candy, with natural orange flavoring throughout. Gelatin is something that you can definitely have while on the Paleo diet, and they’re making full use of it here. Of course real oranges account for the orange taste, which is a recurring theme with Paleo, it uses natural and basic ingredients to accomplish its flavor goals.You’ll have to decide for yourself if you want to use the food coloring to make this look orange, and if so how orange you want it to be. Paleo purists wouldn’t use any food coloring.
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I am doing a low carbohydrate (but not totally Paleo) diet. There are a lot of great recipes in this book. I've already made about half a dozen of the meat dishes, several of the veggies and a dessert. The book is well laid out and truly has a wide variety of types of dishes. I've purchased several of these types of cookbooks, and by far this one is the best. Several co-workers have already ordered their own after looking through mine.
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