Just because it comes from a can doesn’t mean that you can’t prepare something really delicious out of canned salmon. After all, we are fortunate enough that farmed salmon doesn’t hold well to the canning process so we are blessed with an easy and cheap source of wild salmon year-round. In this recipe, I use olive oil and lemon juice, but homemade mayonnaise is also excellent.
The cooking methods, the kitchen equipment and the food culture in the illustrations are also based on archaeological finds. Even the clothes and the clay jars are finds from settlements or graves. The glass in the woman’s hand, for example, was found at an excavation site in Sweden. (Illustration: Communicating Culture & Atelier bunterhund Zürich)
Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.
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Practical Paleo is more than just a recipe book. Instead, the book acts as a particularly effective introduction to the paleo diet, offering information and steps about what you can expect from the beginning all the way through. Some of this information may even be new to people who have been following paleo for a while, especially as there is a discussion about gut bacteria and various ways to live a paleo lifestyle effectively.
Anytime you keep things simple you’ll be keeping them Paleo. Think about it: early man didn’t complicate things because they couldn’t complicate things. They had to use what was around them, whatever that would have been. They also didn’t have well-equipped kitchens like we have, so their cooking style would have been rudimentary, yet effective. This tomato soup only adds a few different items plus some seasonings to fresh, ripe tomatoes so it’s going to really pop in your mouth, and the tomato flavor will be front and center. Luckily we have things like immersion blenders to make quick work of the preparation process.

At its most basic, Paleo meal construction is in itself very simple. Simply fry, bake, stew or poach a nice piece of good quality meat, fish or seafood and then steam, bake or boil a side of fresh or frozen vegetables, making sure to add a good amount of tallow, butter, Ghee, lard, coconut oil or olive oil in the process for taste, energy and health. The process is similar for making delicious stews or omelets: choose your source of protein and your favorite vegetables and cook them in a fresh stock in the case of a stew or with eggs in the case of an omelet. Of course, on top of all this, onions are almost always welcome, as are fresh and dried spices. As you get used to playing more and more with the different flavors available to you, you’ll create amazing dishes without even thinking about it.
You can still enjoy all the taste of a juicy, veggie-topped burger without any of the excess calories due to a thick bun or heavy mayo-based sauce. This paleo salad features a hearty burger patty, fresh lettuce and tomatoes, and an herb-y vinaigrette to drizzle atop. We love the richness that a little ground lamb offers, but you can use all beef or even ground turkey instead.
Lately, I've been seeing more and more people talking about the Paleo diet and the best paleo cookbooks - and for a good reason. Although a lot of diets can often get complicated and hard to understand, the Paleo diet is pretty simple: only eat what a caveman would eat. What's better than being able to eat as much as you want and not have to track anything? Nothing! That's what I thought.
This is where it all begins. Well, for me it was actually Melissa and Dallas Hartwig's first book, It Starts With Food, but that's more of a nutrition book than a cookbook so it's not on this list. The Whole30 book is an upgrade from that, with even better meal planning and cooking resources. No doubt that the official Whole30 Cookbook, which was released in 2016, is also a good one to keep in your kitchen. I'd like to get my hands on that one soon. Buy it here.
The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.
Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.

Junk food and takeout tend to have a strong hold over people, even when they’re attempting to eat healthily. This cookbook attempts to tackle that problem by introducing a range of different paleo dishes that are variations on common takeout meals. This includes recipes from many different cultures, including Indian, Mexican, Greek and American meals.
Jambalaya can be a very hard recipe to make, which is why it’s good that this uses the slow cooker because you can take out some of that complexity. It’s also a dish that lends itself nicely to Paleo eating because it includes plenty of different meats, as well as a good amount of vegetables. For example there is an entire head of cauliflower added to this, and it helps to balance out all of the sausage and chicken. They make it even easier by using premixed Cajun seasoning, but they also point out that you can use your own if you happen to have some already made.
Everybody gets their own mini personal pizza when you cook up these squash pizzas. Each slice of squash becomes a tiny sized pizza that is loaded up with Paleo friendly toppings. It’s a great way to use up that butternut squash you bought, and simply requires that you top them up with items that you like. They’re recommending meats and veggies so you can keep it Paleo, and really as long as you stick with those two types of foods you’ll be doing just fine.
Dried Fruit Bars Bite-Sized Raspberry Popsicles Apple and Almond Butter Bites Acorn Squash with Walnuts & Cranberries Valentine’s Day Smoothie Bacon-Wrapped Avocado Baked Apple Chips Granola Bars Pumpkin Pie Smoothie Apple cinnamon fruit rolls Chocolate nut granola Morning Paleo smoothie Dark Chocolate Covered Almonds Grilled peaches with Prosciutto and Basil Paleo Snacks Kale chips Raspberry-Lime Fruit Dip Chocolate Strawberry Hearts Banana Raisin Cookies Chunky Fruit Popsicles Bite-sized chocolate treats Broiled Grapefruit Fruit Pudding Fried Honey Banana
Tender lamb combines with fresh veggies like kale and butternut squash to create the ultimate comforting winter stew. Richly spiced with coriander, cumin, and paprika, the secret ingredient is also a dash of cinnamon. The best part of this simple paleo recipe is that the majority of the cooking time is hands-off, leaving you time to focus on other things.
This is where it all begins. Well, for me it was actually Melissa and Dallas Hartwig's first book, It Starts With Food, but that's more of a nutrition book than a cookbook so it's not on this list. The Whole30 book is an upgrade from that, with even better meal planning and cooking resources. No doubt that the official Whole30 Cookbook, which was released in 2016, is also a good one to keep in your kitchen. I'd like to get my hands on that one soon. Buy it here.

That’s all for now guys! I hope you enjoy the paleo recipes and they help you and your family eat better & live better. If you have any questions, please get in touch! If you have any other paleo recipe blogs that you think deserve to be on our list – please let me know. We’re working to make this the best page on the internet when it comes to paleo recipes! Stay paleo out there!
Introducing paleo food to a family can be tough, especially as many people are resistant to the idea. As a result, this cookbook offers one potential way around the problem, by focusing on recipes that aren’t obviously paleo. The meals would also work well for many families because they don’t use incredibly obscure ingredients and often don’t have as many steps as other paleo recipes.
The idea behind the paleo diet is that the human digestive system can handle these unprocessed foods much better than it can digest modern-day products like dairy, grains, and sugars. Many people stand by this diet as an effective method for weight loss, cleaning eating, and overall healthy living. Though, as with many fad diets, this can be restrictive since you don't eat dairy or whole grains, so you should consult with your doctor before trying this or any other extreme diet. 
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