Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)


This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Bring pizza back on the menu with this recipe that could win an award. It’s made with rhubarb, which if you’re like us you didn’t know much about it before going Paleo. But it’s a very useful item to have around, and it’s used in plenty of recipes. Here they’ve paired it with chipotle powder so you’re going to get a pizza topped with ingredients you probably wouldn’t have considered before. They use goat cheese, which helps to avoid the use of cheese made from cow’s milk, and this is something you may or may not be able to digest well, so use your own judgement on it.
This cod gets dusted with ginger powder, as well as salt and pepper to keep things very simple, but very delicious. As you see it’s served next to a salad made from zucchini which has been spiralized into ribbons, and gets steamed to keep it very healthy. The whole lot is then covered with a blend of vinegar, soy sauce, honey, and sesame oil, so it’s not too dry and is full of flavor. The cod and zucchini go together very well, making this a light meal you can use as a lunch, or dinner.
5. Cassava Pizza Crust: Speaking of Italian comfort foods, you can still have pizza Fridays. This pizza crust is made of mashed cassava (also called yuca), which crisps up nicely (as our Caribbean friends who traditionally cook with yuca already know). Top it with your favorite veggies and nut cheese and you’re good to go. (via Predominantly Paleo)
​For anyone with special kitchen tools, you'll understand how difficult it can sometimes be to find recipes specific to the equipment you have. However, for those of you who own an Instant Pot, you don't have to worry about that anymore! This cookbook, written by Jennifer Robins, includes 80 different Paleo recipes created with your Instant Pot specifically in mind.
As pictured, these short ribs represent a perfectly portioned Paleo meal, because you’re getting nice a serving of vegetables along with your beef. Short ribs can be tough to cook, and often take a long time roasting or grilling, but she’s broken it down so that it’s a relatively easy recipe, and it’ll come out tasting great. She’s got them rested on top of a portabella mushroom cap, and served up with a side of broccoli, so this is not only a beefy meal, it’s also vegetable centric. Try these off the bone short ribs, and you’ll be hooked.
​For anyone with special kitchen tools, you'll understand how difficult it can sometimes be to find recipes specific to the equipment you have. However, for those of you who own an Instant Pot, you don't have to worry about that anymore! This cookbook, written by Jennifer Robins, includes 80 different Paleo recipes created with your Instant Pot specifically in mind.
We're not entirely certain about the history of this classic recipe's name, but perhaps it has something to do with the spicy kick of the sauce. Our version is a shakshuka-like dish in which fiery harissa paste and heady spices slowly infused a rich tomato sauce where eggs gently poach. Look for jars of harissa with the Middle Eastern foods in your supermarket; you can substitute a half to full teaspoon of crushed red pepper in a pinch. The cook time for the eggs depends on the specific heat of your slow cooker. We offer a range of 15 to 20 minutes, so start checking at 15 minutes (or a couple minutes earlier) to ensure the eggs get done to your liking. 
A true labor of love, "Mediterranean Paleo Cooking" is a collaborative effort from nutritionist Caitlin Weeks and her Algerian chef husband, Nabil Boumrar. Together, they explore the flavors of Boumrar's native North Africa, offering an array of gluten-free, Paleo-friendly recipes such as cinnamon-braised beef, almond meatball soup and spicy chicken tagine. Staples like falafel, moussaka, hummus and pita bread are also included, along with multicourse menu plans — providing home cooks with the necessary tools for a Mediterranean-themed dinner party.
So about the recipe… You have to buy the Paleo wraps online or if you’re from my area (Mandeville, Louisiana), my friend at Vive sells them. I’m not always a huge fan of buying Paleo products, but 1) these are only made of coconut, so they’re super healthy and 2) these are SO good and will give you so many new options for lunch. After you buy the wraps, make the chicken salad and use a Paleo mayo recipe. Do not get lazy about the Paleo mayo and buy store-bought; the Paleo mayo is much better. Mayo can be tough if you don’t follow directions. Happy lunch-making! Share with me in the comments your opinion on this recipe. 
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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