Getting kids to eat the food put in front of them can be a tough battle at the best of times, especially as they are often picky eaters. Trying to get them to like specialized food is more challenging still, which is where this book comes in. With that in mind, the design and recipes here are all about finding paleo dishes that kids will genuinely love.
This Paleo diet recipe has a traditional Italian feel to it thanks to the use of Italian sausage and the spices it is packed with. It then takes it one step further with pesto, an item that you can make on your own following a Paleo friendly pesto recipe. There are also plenty of nourishing foods like baby spinach, and tomatoes, so you’re getting a fair amount of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. You can easily omit the mozzarella if you’re nixing all cheese per the official Paleo stance on cheese, but these are fresh mozzarella balls, and you may find they’re easier to digest.
Isn’t it awesome just how many foods you can have with Paleo. There’s virtually nothing that’s off limits as long as you’re using the right ingredients. In this version of the classic chocolate cream pie, the regular crust has been replaced with an almond-based crust so you’ll get more fiber and protein from the crust that you would with any flour-based crust. The chocolate is from cacao paste and isn’t filled with dairy or refined sugar. A perfectly chocolatey and healthy pie!

This mackerel recipe uses a pound of fresh mackerel with the skin left on. It is advertised as being served with a magic sauce and without taking any of the magic away we can tell you that it’s made with sherry, honey, some vinegar, and fresh ginger so it’s going to taste incredible, without using any ingredients that will set you back on your progress. On Paleo you may see yourself eating more fish than you used to eat, because it is such a healthy meat, and something our ancestors surely would have eaten. They have it served on a bed of cauli-rice, a rice substitute made from cauliflower.
Though she  doesn't know it yet, Melissa and I are going to be best friends someday. She loves her spices, I love my spices. She's half Lebanese, I'm half Indian (close enough!). She's a badass former roller girl, I'm a roller girls spectator. She's a hilarious writer, I like to think that I'm a hilarious writer. Really though, I respect this woman so much and her book is genius. She not only dishes up bold flavors and paleo hacks, but the book is laid out in the exact way my brain works. She helps with meal planning, offers other additional suggestions for each recipe and leaves no question unanswered. My copy is covered in turmeric and coconut oil and I don't even care. Buy it here.
Kelly is such a talented photographer. Her book makes me want to eat the food right off the page. Equally as good as the photography are her recipes. Kelly incorporates chocolate into each recipe so thoughtfully that we cooked from it all week and didn’t feel chocolated-out! The book is packed with delicious recipes for treats, but it also has a handful of savory recipes with a chocolate twist. If you enjoy chocolate even half as much as I do, then this book is a must-have!
Steak and eggs are two of the cornerstones of Paleo so why not enjoy them together for even more goodness. This combination though is not new and steak & eggs have been enjoyed for a long time, either in the morning for breakfast or at night for dinner. It also couldn’t really get simpler than this. This is a single recipe, but calculate about two eggs per steak. You can enjoy your eggs pretty much the way you like them usually, but in this recipe the classic sunny side up eggs are prepared. I like to make it so the yolks are still runny and can drip on my steak, enhancing flavor and texture at the same time.
These teriyaki kabobs give you the flavor of teriyaki chicken that you might get from a Japanese restaurant, but in kebab form so they are grilled and have a very distinctive flavor. You’ll notice the attention to detail, like using organic wheat free soy sauce in order to make them. They also recommend using raw organic honey, which will replace the sugar typically found in a teriyaki sauce recipe. There is also fresh ginger used, and garlic, and they recommend free range organic chicken breasts, which should become your new way of buying chicken when on the Paleo diet.

This stew is made from a bunch of beef, some blueberries, carrots, and an onion. It may sound like a bit of an odd mix, but trust us, it works. A stew is the perfect platform to construct a great Paleo meal, and here there’s plenty of healthy foods being combined. You’ll get plenty of protein from all of that beef, as well as important minerals like iron. Blueberries consistently make the news because of their antioxidant value, and carrots have long been known to be healthy due to the beta Carotene they contain. Onions also add to the nutritional value of this meal, and it will definitely keep you satisfied for several hours.
It’s natural to want crunchy foods, but on Paleo you won’t want to subject yourself to many of the crunchy options out there. In this recipe they are coating a snapper fillet with sesame seeds, so you will get the delicate texture of the fish juxtaposed with the crunchy sesame seeds, all fried up in grass fed butter. The frying makes sure that the sesame seeds have a nice toasted flavor, and they point out that if you don’t have grass fed butter you can also use ghee or bacon fat to fry the fish in. This fish goes great with any number of vegetables as a side, and we like to recommend broccoli as a healthy option.
Yes, the egg is raw, and raw egg is perfectly safe to consume, so long as you trust the source of your eggs. Anything you buy from a grocery store should be set, and if you get them from the Farmer’s Market or grow your own, just make sure you wash the shell VERY WELL before using raw egg, as this is where most of the contaminate comes from. (The shell isn’t sterile, you crack the egg, the shell contacts the egg and leaves some salmonella behind, the egg is now unsafe)
This is an easy way to musakhan, and if you don’t know how to make this traditional dish, this is a great place to start. It uses plenty of chicken thighs, so you’ll be all set in the protein department. It also contains plenty of spices like allspice, cloves, and saffron. You’ll be getting a few onions in this, but you may want to eat a salad with it because there are not a lot of vegetables being used, and you want to create a nice balance between all that chicken and your vegetable intake. Don’t be afraid to try new recipes on Paleo, trial and error is how our species made it this far.

The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)

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