These mini pizzas are great to have as a snack, at a party, for watching the big game, as a lunch, or a dinner, depending on how many of them you eat at one time. They are made with a crust that is formed with almond flour, so they’re Paleo friendly, and they are topped simply with tomato paste and some blue cheese, so you get the rich and tangy taste of blue cheese in each bite. You’ll want to go with a goat’s milk variety of blue cheese, if you go this route at all. Some Paleo eaters can handle small amounts of cheese on occasion.
Not paleo specifically, but this gorgeously designed book is full of plant-forward recipes that are either Whole30-compliant already or require a little bit of adaptation to fit into the plan. At any rate, I always welcome extra inspiration when it comes to vegetables, so I love paging through this one. The photography and design is really stunning and makes me want to eat zucchini ribbons all day. Buy it here.

Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.
A paleo diet promotes high-protein recipes with responsibly raised, antibiotic- and hormone-free meats and poultry, and wild-caught, sustainably sourced seafood. Good fat comes in as a close second, with sources like nuts, seeds, coconut oil, avocado oil, and extra virgin olive oil as excellent choices. Vegetables are also key, as long as they're not too starchy. Avoid white potatoes, but most fresh veggies are fair game.
This is one tasty burger, and they chose wisely when they topped it with guacamole. The guac not only adds in a massive amount of flavor, but it also adds healthy fat, potassium, and fiber to the mix. Speaking of fiber, you’ll get even more from the buns. That’s because they’re made from sweet potato noodles which are made using a spiralizer and fresh sweet potatoes. Who ever heard of a burger bun that provides this level of antioxidants?
I have looked through many Paleo cookbooks and this one has become my favorite! Many paleo cook book recipes use a lot of expensive ingredients and are time consuming. This book os not like that. I have tried many of the recipes and they are delicious! Sometimes I do not have much time to spend in the kitchen and this book provides recipes for those who live very busy lives. I highly recommend this book!
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