The recipes themselves cover many different types of dishes, including breakfast, drinks, snacks, desserts and, of course, main meals. With around 100 recipes in total, there is not a large number of recipes in any given category but that scarcely matters. Instead, the book acts as a great source of paleo recipes, regardless of your preferences for food.

The chicken. The green sauce. The homemade sriracha. Some of Michelle Tam's recipes are a little more difficult than I like to attempt during a Whole30 (I prefer to keep it simple), but others are in heavy rotation (especially the green chicken and the Peruvian chicken). The Nom Nom app is amazing too — totally worth the price. You can also pre-order Michelle's next book, Ready or Not!, which is coming out in August 2017. Buy it here.
Cajun seasoning is always going to do a great job of adding spice and some heat to a meal, and in this recipe they provide you with the steps to make your own Cajun seasoning mix from scratch. Be sure to make a big batch of it so you can store it and have it on hand for more Cajun style cooking in the future. Once you have the Cajun burgers in place it’s time to top them off with some caramelized onions. This is served up without a bun, and on a bed of creamed spinach, and she provides a nice creamed spinach recipe that doesn’t use any dairy, but uses coconut milk instead.
This mackerel recipe uses a pound of fresh mackerel with the skin left on. It is advertised as being served with a magic sauce and without taking any of the magic away we can tell you that it’s made with sherry, honey, some vinegar, and fresh ginger so it’s going to taste incredible, without using any ingredients that will set you back on your progress. On Paleo you may see yourself eating more fish than you used to eat, because it is such a healthy meat, and something our ancestors surely would have eaten. They have it served on a bed of cauli-rice, a rice substitute made from cauliflower.
The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.

Butternut squash is great for you, kale is fantastic for you, so in this recipe you’re already starting off on the right foot. Next, add in some beef and you’re doing just dandy in regards to Paleo eating. That’s because you’re getting plenty of nutrition from the kale and squash, as well as the requisite protein from the beef, so you’ll feel satiated at the end of the bowl, and this is a stew that eats like a meal because it is a meal, it just happens to be in a bowl. You brown the meat in bacon fat, giving it wild amounts of flavor.

The answer: Pick up this book. Ready or Not! makes healthy Paleo home cooking a breeze, no matter if there’s time to prepare or just minutes to spare. Whether you’re a fastidious planner or a last-minute improviser, you’ll find plenty of deliciously nourishing options, from make-ahead feasts and treats to lightning-fast leftover makeovers and make-now meals. Presented in Nom Nom Paleo’s deliriously fun comic book style, Ready or Not!’s step-by-step recipes, photos, and meal plans make cooking a habit you’ll never want to break.
At first, the title may seem like a paradox – chocolate and Paleo don’t always go hand in hand, but this book is a compilation of 80 mostly-healthy dessert recipes that are grain and dairy free. Certainly, any kind of treat should not be a daily indulgence, but for special occasions and gatherings, the recipe in The Paleo Chocolate Lovers Cookbook look delicious. I made the chocolate cupcakes with cookie dough frosting for a party recently and they were definitely a hit. Other recipes include:
According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.
The recipes are incredible and the photography is gorgeous. I love how this book  is organized in menus, and each menu gives you tips on how to prepare for the party efficiently. My other favorite part of this book is that most of the recipes use simple, fresh ingredients.  If you are already a real-foodie, you likely have most of the ingredients on hand.CLICK HERE to order Gather.
These stuffed peppers are using sweet peppers so they are not spicy, and they are stuffed with goat cheese, which does not contain as much lactose as cheese made from cow’s milk. They say that you can use a different cheese if you do not like goat cheese, and with the cheese question you’re going to have to come up with your own answer as to which kind you are going to use while you are eating Paleo. If your body responds well to eating cheese, you’ll be able to have it more often than someone that can’t process it.
Shepherd’s pie is a popular dish in the UK, but not so much in the States. It’s a shame because it’s very delicious, but it is also made with a lot of ingredients that aren’t necessarily Paleo if it’s made the traditional way. This recipe makes plenty of adjustments so that a Paleo eater can enjoy comforting food. For starters they’ve gotten rid of white potatoes that play such a big role, and replace them with sweet potatoes which are a recommended Paleo food because they are loaded with antioxidants and fiber. The other ingredients all fall well within your Paleo guidelines, so you can eat until satisfied.
Here’s another complete paleo meal in one “container.” The red bell peppers get cooked to mellow sweetness, but still hold their shape enough to keep other delicious ingredients inside. This recipe, with its peppers and tomatoes, is a great source of vitamins A and C, even after the vitamin loss that cooking causes. It’s also a good source of protein (4 ounces of lean turkey has over 20 grams).
With this crock pot recipe you can create a cashew chicken dish that will rival anything that you can buy from your local Chinese restaurant. The great thing is that because it is using the slow cooker it is going to be a really easy as far as preparation goes. You won’t have to babysit this, all that’s needed is to place the ingredients into the pot and let it cook itself for 3 to 4 hours. The great thing is they’ve used things like arrowroot starch instead of a breading made from wheat. It’s simple and subtle changes like this that can turn a Paleo no-no into a Paleo yum-yum.

These tiny tacos are served up on jicama shells. The rest of the ingredients are placed in the slow cooker until the meat is just right. That means you can pop it in a few hours before the big game, and serve them up when everyone has arrived. They are billed as being great sports food, because they are smaller than a traditional taco, so they’re mini sized and good for serving. But they still have plenty of flavor thanks to all of the cilantro, garlic, lines, and oregano. The jicama shells really help to avoid the use of a flour tortilla.
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
If you like to start your day with granola, most other versions you see on store shelves will not be approved on the Paleo diet. You’ll need construct your own granola recipe using Paleo foods such as nuts, seeds, dried fruits, and spices like cinnamon, and pumpkin spice. This gives you the ability to customize the granola according to your own taste as well as make sure you are only using high quality ingredients. You’ll want to avoid eating it with yogurt as well, as that’s a dairy product. Try it with almond milk as a delicious and nutritious substitute that’s dairy free.
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
On nights I want to guarantee both cooking and cleanup are a total breeze, I lean on recipes that come together with a single pot, pan, or skillet. One-pan is basically kitchen code for "easy" — something you can totally appreciate when you're following a Paleo diet. Since the diet makes eating out and ordering in kind of tricky (although not impossible), it requires a lot of cooking. So why not keep delicious grain- and dairy-free dinners as simple as possible, with one of these 15 recipes that come together in a single pot, pan, or skillet?
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
2013 was a BIG year for Paleo! The movement has really grown, with lots of new blogs and tons of new cookbooks! I know that many of you have decided to give Paleo a try in the new year, so I have made a list of all my favorite cookbooks for you. Having a few Paleo cookbooks on hand is really helpful for staying on track and keeping your meals interesting.
Danielle Walker believes the right foods improve health and mental awareness!  The simplicity of how these are put together will surprise and delight, so you don’t have to be a master chef to have the ability to prepare them.  There is amazing variety here as well, from braising to one pot dishes to thirty minute meals and more—there are choices for everyone.  For those who have busy weeknights, you’ll never have to worry again.
This book features over 100 different Paleo recipes and if you don’t like a stuffy cookbook, this is the one to go with. It has a humorous style that will keep you smiling while you cook, and makes the process that much more fun. There is a whopping 288 pages for you to explore, so chances are you won’t be short on recipes for any type of meal you’d want to cook up. If you’ve ever wondered how to make your Paleo meals taste as good as possible, or how to maximize the effectiveness of the time you spend in the kitchen, you’ll be happy with the tips, tricks, and ideology of this Paleo chef.
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