They’ve taken the approach of using meat to replace the crust of the pizza, which cuts out the grains and makes this one meaty pizza pie. The crust is made from Italian sausage, so it’s going to be massively flavorful, and a little spicey. They recommend using a sugar-free pizza sauce, which on Paleo you don’t want to eat any refined sugar, so this is a good recommendation to follow. They’ve made sure to include a bunch of vegetables in this “meatizza” so you are still going to get your nutritional needs met, in addition to all of that meat.
This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.
For busy commuters, it is easy to get in the rut of eating hard boiled eggs every morning.  This book will help you keep both your breakfasts and lunches exciting, even with a busy work schedule. The recipes are not only delicious and healthy, they are easy to make. In addition, Diana is a nutritional therapist and offers the reader tons of practical tips on how to follow a Paleo diet, including a guide for eating out!

This cod gets dusted with ginger powder, as well as salt and pepper to keep things very simple, but very delicious. As you see it’s served next to a salad made from zucchini which has been spiralized into ribbons, and gets steamed to keep it very healthy. The whole lot is then covered with a blend of vinegar, soy sauce, honey, and sesame oil, so it’s not too dry and is full of flavor. The cod and zucchini go together very well, making this a light meal you can use as a lunch, or dinner.

5. Cassava Pizza Crust: Speaking of Italian comfort foods, you can still have pizza Fridays. This pizza crust is made of mashed cassava (also called yuca), which crisps up nicely (as our Caribbean friends who traditionally cook with yuca already know). Top it with your favorite veggies and nut cheese and you’re good to go. (via Predominantly Paleo)
These burgers are inspired by Thanksgiving dinner. They’re made from turkey instead of beef or chicken, and are served with a cranberry aioli to invoke memories of cranberry sauce that’s served with the Thanksgiving turkey. But the most interesting thing about this recipe is the sweet potato buns made from fresh sweet potatoes instead of going without a bun. You don’t have to wait around until the holidays to enjoy the flavors you love.
Chicken with Creamy Tomato Curry Simple Chicken with Winter Vegetables Grilled Coconut-Lime Chicken Tex-Mex Chicken Kabobs Chicken Korma With Cauliflower Rice Chicken Nuggets With Avocado-Cilantro Dip Orange, Chicken And Vegetable Stir-Fry Balsamic Chicken Drumsticks Chicken Caesar Burgers Chicken and Cranberry Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Grilled Pineapple Chicken Sweet Garlic Chicken Slow Cooker Queso Chicken Chili Slow Cooker Buffalo Chicken Meatballs Tuscan Chicken Skillet Cilantro And Lime Chicken BBQ Chicken Salad Coconut-Buttermilk Southwestern Grilled Chicken Honey-Mustard Drumsticks Spicy Sriracha Chicken Wings Buffalo Chicken Wraps Oven-Roasted Star Anise And Cinnamon Chicken Delicious Butter Chicken Recipe Creamy Chicken And Delicata Squash Baked Chicken Nuggets Guacamole Stuffed Chicken Coconut crusted chicken strips Olive, garlic and lemon chicken
The main limitation to mention is the layout. In particular, the overall design and font size means that some parts of the recipes are hard to read – especially if you’re trying to follow the recipe while cooking. The problem may not be dramatic for everybody but it would be a particularly significant issue for anybody with even minor vision challenges.

I'm a guy, carnivore and amateur cook . I love meat so going Paleo isn't a great stretch for me, but I'm always looking for ways to bump up the flavor and elevate my cooking. What I like about this cookbook is that the recipes are easy to follow. But what I LOVE is the diversity of different cooking styles and meats used. The author takes you on a world wide trip of flavor and introduces you to proteins most people would be nervous to try to cook or eat. While you have your normal proteins such as beef, pork, chicken and lamb, you also get an intro to frog legs, gator, bison, buffalo, venison, elk, etc. Take a walk on the wide side and let your inner Captain Caveman taste buds scream in joy with these tasty and healthy recipes. Good Eats.
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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