You’ll learn how great the Paleolithic diet really can be when it comes to fat loss and getting healthier.  The best news is that the food you put into your body encourages fat burning.  These recipes will make you feel better than you might have ever felt before.  Paleo enthusiasts will benefit from habits leading to a more productive paleo lifestyle!
This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.

Bring pizza back on the menu with this recipe that could win an award. It’s made with rhubarb, which if you’re like us you didn’t know much about it before going Paleo. But it’s a very useful item to have around, and it’s used in plenty of recipes. Here they’ve paired it with chipotle powder so you’re going to get a pizza topped with ingredients you probably wouldn’t have considered before. They use goat cheese, which helps to avoid the use of cheese made from cow’s milk, and this is something you may or may not be able to digest well, so use your own judgement on it.

Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.

5. Cassava Pizza Crust: Speaking of Italian comfort foods, you can still have pizza Fridays. This pizza crust is made of mashed cassava (also called yuca), which crisps up nicely (as our Caribbean friends who traditionally cook with yuca already know). Top it with your favorite veggies and nut cheese and you’re good to go. (via Predominantly Paleo)


Casseroles are usually a big hit with the family, and perhaps no other casserole can match a pizza casserole. It’s like a pizza stacked onto another pizza and is sure to please the pickiest of eaters, even if that’s you. It’s also a Paleo-friendly recipe, with no crust to speak of, just layer upon layer of yummy items like eggplant, parmesan, sausage, and of course marinara sauce. When it comes to pizza you have to make the determination of how you feel about mozzarella cheese because it’s not a Paleo food, but many followers will have it now and then.
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.

This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.
Two teaspoons of smoked paprika may seem like a lot, but it will help to form a nice crust on the pork as it sears in the pan. You can also sub 1 teaspoon ground cumin plus 1 teaspoon chipotle chile powder. A hot oven will help the sweet potato wedges crisp up on the outside without burning. Remove the pork from the oven just as it reaches 140. The temp will climb to an ideal 145, and the meat will be just right. This is paleo version of one of our favorite weeknight dinners.

You can still enjoy all the taste of a juicy, veggie-topped burger without any of the excess calories due to a thick bun or heavy mayo-based sauce. This paleo salad features a hearty burger patty, fresh lettuce and tomatoes, and an herb-y vinaigrette to drizzle atop. We love the richness that a little ground lamb offers, but you can use all beef or even ground turkey instead.
This chorizo chili is made in the Crock Pot so it’s going to come out perfectly cooked without much attention from you. It uses a combination of grass fed beef, as well as chorizo sausage which gives it plenty of spice, which is good if you like your chili spicy. Not to worry, there are other spices and seasonings used to kick up the heat, so you can adjust it according to your own taste. For example there are Ro-Tel tomatoes, which carry their own spiciness, so you may want to opt out of those and just use regular tomatoes instead. There’s also cumin, as well as chipotle peppers, just add more or less as desired.
This is a Fruit Roll-Up knock off that will give you a serving of actual fruit rather than a bunch of artificial ingredients and commercial sweeteners. The cool thing is she uses three different types of fruit in these, with apples, strawberries, and grapefruit making an appearance. Making it look like a strip of leather is easier than you think, and she walks you through the steps so you can make it look appetizing. And they’re great for kid’s lunches as well, so you can feel good about what they are snacking on.
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
They’ve taken the approach of using meat to replace the crust of the pizza, which cuts out the grains and makes this one meaty pizza pie. The crust is made from Italian sausage, so it’s going to be massively flavorful, and a little spicey. They recommend using a sugar-free pizza sauce, which on Paleo you don’t want to eat any refined sugar, so this is a good recommendation to follow. They’ve made sure to include a bunch of vegetables in this “meatizza” so you are still going to get your nutritional needs met, in addition to all of that meat.
Paleo in 28 is designed to get people started with the paleo diet and it performs this role well. By relying on relatively few ingredients overall, this book means that you’re not forced to go out and buy a large number of ingredients all at once. There will still be some new ingredients if you’ve never tried paleo before but the nature of the book means that this shouldn’t overwhelming.

Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
At some point on the Paleo diet you’re going to crave something sweet, flavorful, and crunchy, and that’s when we’d recommend baking up a batch of these clusters. They use pumpkin seeds, and we’re just finding out how healthy these are, and the benefits they provide. The sweetness comes from coconut sugar and honey, two approved sources of sweet on Paleo. We recommend going with organic raw honey to avoid the processed kind you find on store shelves. The other ingredients are all-natural, just be sure to use organic pumpkin seeds for the best results.

5. Cassava Pizza Crust: Speaking of Italian comfort foods, you can still have pizza Fridays. This pizza crust is made of mashed cassava (also called yuca), which crisps up nicely (as our Caribbean friends who traditionally cook with yuca already know). Top it with your favorite veggies and nut cheese and you’re good to go. (via Predominantly Paleo)
Though she  doesn't know it yet, Melissa and I are going to be best friends someday. She loves her spices, I love my spices. She's half Lebanese, I'm half Indian (close enough!). She's a badass former roller girl, I'm a roller girls spectator. She's a hilarious writer, I like to think that I'm a hilarious writer. Really though, I respect this woman so much and her book is genius. She not only dishes up bold flavors and paleo hacks, but the book is laid out in the exact way my brain works. She helps with meal planning, offers other additional suggestions for each recipe and leaves no question unanswered. My copy is covered in turmeric and coconut oil and I don't even care. Buy it here.

Kirsty, with animal protein I’m a pretty picky. I buy at butchers where I trust in the quality. In my opinion there is a huge difference in taste and quality when it comes to animal protein. Grains and veggies I’m more lenient but never with animal protein. The cheapest way to get high quality meat is share a whole animal with friends or neighbors. The bacon we eat is from a pig I share with another 2 families. Once a year I get 1/3 and freeze it all. The bacon is incomparable to any grocery store bacon. I’d rather it less often.


This burger is made with mushroom caps instead of a bun, and it is designed to mimic the flavors of a Philly steak sandwich, only in burger form. It is made from slices of sirloin, so it’s using Green me, and of course has all of the necessary ingredients that go into a Philly steak, such as a bell peppers in multiple colors, and an onion. They’re using lard to fry it all up in, so this is going to be one flavor-filled burger. Cutting out the bread is a facet of Paleo that many followers struggle with, but if you use substitutes like they are here, the process is easier.
If you thought pulled pork sliders were off the menu, you were wrong. You just have to find creative workarounds when you are making Paleo recipes. In this case they’ve replaced hamburger buns with sliced sweet potato, which gets the wheat out. They haven’t skimped on the pulled pork which is going to taste just like you’d expect it to if you ordered a pulled pork sandwich from a barbecue joint. Creativity is one of the main and factors when you are eating Paleo because nothing is really off limits, you just have to figure out how you can have it.
These gummy orange slices are really great because they don’t use any sugar, but they come out just like a piece of gummy candy, with natural orange flavoring throughout. Gelatin is something that you can definitely have while on the Paleo diet, and they’re making full use of it here. Of course real oranges account for the orange taste, which is a recurring theme with Paleo, it uses natural and basic ingredients to accomplish its flavor goals.You’ll have to decide for yourself if you want to use the food coloring to make this look orange, and if so how orange you want it to be. Paleo purists wouldn’t use any food coloring.
If you are planning on doing a Whole30 in the New Year, then this book is a perfect resource. Almost all of the recipes are Whole30 approved. The first 30 pages of this book are filled with information that will teach you how to adapt a Paleo lifestyle and live it successfully. This book is packed with 200 recipes and quick meal ideas! Melissa has even included adaptations for those of you following an Autoimmune Protocol. This section is particularly helpful, as it is often hard to find Paleo recipes that are also void of nightshades and nuts. Read my full review here.
This book is particularly geared towards entertaining friends and family with stunning Paleo meals that they might not even know are Paleo. The typical problem presents itself that you want to entertain, but you don’t want to sacrifice your progress by eating a bunch of foods that aren’t Paleo friendly. The answer is to cater your own Paleo approved foods, and this recipe guide shows you how to make foods that everyone will enjoy, regardless of whether or not they share your Paleo philosophy. It has everything from a full dinner party to just a casual get together. Become a master Paleo host with this guide.
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