Grandmas may have spent hours perfecting their versions of meatballs (and we love 'em for it!), but in these busy times, slaving over a stove may not be on the agenda. Expedite your meatball-making with these breadcrumb-free, baked-not-fried pork and beef spheres, drowned in a homemade marinara sauce. You won’t believe it only takes about 30 minutes for the whole thing to come together.
According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.
Though she  doesn't know it yet, Melissa and I are going to be best friends someday. She loves her spices, I love my spices. She's half Lebanese, I'm half Indian (close enough!). She's a badass former roller girl, I'm a roller girls spectator. She's a hilarious writer, I like to think that I'm a hilarious writer. Really though, I respect this woman so much and her book is genius. She not only dishes up bold flavors and paleo hacks, but the book is laid out in the exact way my brain works. She helps with meal planning, offers other additional suggestions for each recipe and leaves no question unanswered. My copy is covered in turmeric and coconut oil and I don't even care. Buy it here.
Just because it comes from a can doesn’t mean that you can’t prepare something really delicious out of canned salmon. After all, we are fortunate enough that farmed salmon doesn’t hold well to the canning process so we are blessed with an easy and cheap source of wild salmon year-round. In this recipe, I use olive oil and lemon juice, but homemade mayonnaise is also excellent.
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.
This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
If you like to start your day with granola, most other versions you see on store shelves will not be approved on the Paleo diet. You’ll need construct your own granola recipe using Paleo foods such as nuts, seeds, dried fruits, and spices like cinnamon, and pumpkin spice. This gives you the ability to customize the granola according to your own taste as well as make sure you are only using high quality ingredients. You’ll want to avoid eating it with yogurt as well, as that’s a dairy product. Try it with almond milk as a delicious and nutritious substitute that’s dairy free.
Salmon is one of the best foods you can eat on Paleo, and here they have added maple syrup to the recipe so that you’ll get the rich flavor and sweetness of the syrup counter-balancing the strong flavor of the salmon. It also gives it a nice glaze, making it more appetizing to look at. They also have a good mix of spices and you’ll find cinnamon, nutmeg, onion powder and pepper being used to give this a remarkable flavor that you probably haven’t experienced before in regards to salmon. Serve this up with a baked sweet potato and you’re good to go.
Most tacos come in a corn tortilla, but these paleo tacos are wrapped in a crisp lettuce leaf. Serve them as an easily packed lunch “sandwich” or as cocktail hour finger food. A 3-ounce serving of skirt steak provides almost half a milligram of vitamin B6, nearly 40 percent of your daily need. People with poor kidney function or with malabsorption conditions like celiac disease especially need to be sure they’re getting enough B6.

If you want to try a Japanese-style burger without traveling to Japan, this is your ticket. They’re using organic grass-fed ground beef from Trader Joe’s, an excellent way to start off any burger recipe. From there they add onion, garlic, an egg, and some seasoning to get these just right. They then pan fry them, and they give the instruction of not squeezing them during the cooking process because they’ll end up dry. You can flip them as needed, but when it’s all said and done these retain their round shape. To make it even more Japanese themed you can use soy sauce during the cooking process.


Spiralized sweet potatoes make for a hearty pasta replacement in this fresh feeling paleo meal. Puttanesca is an ultra-savory Italian pasta dish that typically consists of capers, anchovies, olives, tomatoes, garlic, and olive oil. In this iteration, fresh tomatoes meet their salty match for a hearty, dairy-free pasta dish that's light on calories and heavy on flavor. For a vegetarian option, leave out the anchovies and use vegetable broth instead of chicken.
This sundae is trying to replicate the joy experienced from eating an Almond Joy, without including all of the ingredients they contain that aren’t good for you. Imagine, a guilt-free ice cream treat, that’s what she’s going for here. The chocolate being used is dark chocolate, so already you’re doing better than if you were using milk chocolate. The coconut of course comes from real coconut, but it’s unsweetened coconut flakes so you’re not getting refined sugar, as the sweetness in this sweet treat comes from honey. The almonds add healthy fat and are an essential part of this Almond Joy sundae.

If you’re looking for a beef Paleo dish that comes out looking fantastic, like something you’d want to serve company, you’ll want to go with this braised bottom round roast. It is made with a whopping 3 pounds of grass fed beef bottom round, and has plenty of sweet potatoes, so you’ll be getting the fiber needed to help all of that meat make it through your system. An onion is added for good measure, and there are plenty of sage leaves used for flavor. She’s also using plenty of garlic, so you know that this roast will be noticeable on your palate.
You might have heard about the paleo diet by now — a way to eat based on how our hunter-gatherer ancestors (read: cavemen) did it back in the day. While going paleo eliminates some tasty modern options like breads, pastas, and other grains, along with legumes, dairy, and soy, it emphasizes other delectable, whole foods that provide various health benefits.
Paleo in 28 is designed to get people started with the paleo diet and it performs this role well. By relying on relatively few ingredients overall, this book means that you’re not forced to go out and buy a large number of ingredients all at once. There will still be some new ingredients if you’ve never tried paleo before but the nature of the book means that this shouldn’t overwhelming.

Shepherd’s pie is a popular dish in the UK, but not so much in the States. It’s a shame because it’s very delicious, but it is also made with a lot of ingredients that aren’t necessarily Paleo if it’s made the traditional way. This recipe makes plenty of adjustments so that a Paleo eater can enjoy comforting food. For starters they’ve gotten rid of white potatoes that play such a big role, and replace them with sweet potatoes which are a recommended Paleo food because they are loaded with antioxidants and fiber. The other ingredients all fall well within your Paleo guidelines, so you can eat until satisfied.
Guaranteed to be a fast favorite, this recipe plays on the sweet-savory match made in flavor heaven: pork + apples. Sautéed apples add a hint of sweetness and delightfully smooth texture to this hearty paleo pork dish. If you don't have access to Honeycrisp apples, use a pink lady, gala, or jazz apple instead. Dijon mustard counteracts the sweetness of the apple adding incredible depth of flavor that the whole family can enjoy.
These teriyaki kabobs give you the flavor of teriyaki chicken that you might get from a Japanese restaurant, but in kebab form so they are grilled and have a very distinctive flavor. You’ll notice the attention to detail, like using organic wheat free soy sauce in order to make them. They also recommend using raw organic honey, which will replace the sugar typically found in a teriyaki sauce recipe. There is also fresh ginger used, and garlic, and they recommend free range organic chicken breasts, which should become your new way of buying chicken when on the Paleo diet.

This is where it all begins. Well, for me it was actually Melissa and Dallas Hartwig's first book, It Starts With Food, but that's more of a nutrition book than a cookbook so it's not on this list. The Whole30 book is an upgrade from that, with even better meal planning and cooking resources. No doubt that the official Whole30 Cookbook, which was released in 2016, is also a good one to keep in your kitchen. I'd like to get my hands on that one soon. Buy it here.
This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
Wondering what to eat on the Paleo diet? Explore PaleoPlan’s 450+ easy and delicious Paleo recipes—all absolutely free! Our recipes are a fast and healthy way to lose weight, feel better, and get in shape on the Paleo diet. From breakfast to dinner, we have a variety of meals for every occasion. With so many amazing recipe options to choose from, you’re sure to find a delicious, satisfying, and 100% Paleo diet meal that’s perfect for you, your family and friends.
Get real energy from natural sources with these coconut almond energy bars. Forget energy drinks or energy bars sold in stores. That’s all phoney baloney parlor tricks that make your heart race a little faster so you think you have more energy. But what happens later is you crash and have even less energy than when you started. These bars are filled with almonds and other wholesome foods, taste amazing, and give you that get up and go you need during the day.
I’ve been an athlete since about age 8, and competing—whether it’s with myself or against a field of others—has always been part of my identity. When I found Paleo in 2009, my health and performance improved dramatically. At the time, I was racing mountain bikes and doing triathlons. Then, I became a competitive CrossFitter, most notably participating at the 2013 SoCal Regionals with Team Sea of Green.
Juli Bauer’s Paleo Cookbook is my third cookbook that I could not be more proud of, more excited for, and more in love with. A cookbook that is filled with not only over 100 recipes I am excited to show the world, but a book that showcases my realistic viewpoints on overall health. This book was created to inspire others to turn around their health through food, through exercise, and through positivity. To me, paleo is not only about changing your body and your health, but it’s about how it makes you feel: the energy it gives you, the confidence you find, and the way it helps you shine from within. Here’s where you can find the book:

This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
You can eat well and never worry about feeling deprived because this great cookbook offers creative meal ideas for even the pickiest of eaters.  Cravings are taken care of easily and time convenience is certainly gained with several weeknight meals included.  Everyone receives pre-made shopping lists to make the next grocery trip more convenient and productive.
Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
Courtney loves to share great wine, good food, and loves to explore far flung places- all while masting an everyday elegant and easy style. Courtney writes the popular creative lifestyle blog Sweet C’s Designs- a site devoted to delicious everyday recipes, home decor, crafts, DIY inspiration, and photography tips to help make your every day extraordinary.
There's no one "right way" to do paleo. If you're just starting out, it may take some time to figure out what feels best. Maybe you just eat paleo after 2 p.m. on weekdays; maybe you are so hardcore, you get uneasy just looking at a slice of bread. Most of us fall somewhere in between. We're advocates of a more generally "paleo-based" system, following paleo principles most of the time, but making reasonable exceptions for important events or your mom's famous chocolate chip cookies.
The mild flavor of spinach makes it wonderfully adaptable to sizzling garlic and spice from the crushed red pepper. For fullest flavor, cook spinach only until it begins to turn limp. Sautéed spinach can be made in a snap and pairs perfectly with almost every protein. If you have leftover spinach on hand or any wilting leafy greens, sautéing with a little olive oil and garlic instantly brings it back to life. Starting aromatics in a cold skillet lets them infuse the oil. The garlic also has less chance of burning. Let cooked potatoes dry out so they'll be extra crispy in the hash. Leftover cooked potatoes would be even better. Ground chicken has a touch more fat than ground chicken breast, key for more flavorful hash. Serve with Sautéed Spinach with Garlic and Red Pepper.
Everybody gets their own mini personal pizza when you cook up these squash pizzas. Each slice of squash becomes a tiny sized pizza that is loaded up with Paleo friendly toppings. It’s a great way to use up that butternut squash you bought, and simply requires that you top them up with items that you like. They’re recommending meats and veggies so you can keep it Paleo, and really as long as you stick with those two types of foods you’ll be doing just fine.
Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.
Brownies usually require mixing up the batter, baking it, then letting them cool just long enough so you can take a bite. But these brownie bites require no baking, so it’s just a matter of mixing up the batter, rolling it into a ball, and digging in. The nice part about these are that you can store them in the fridge and they keep really well, so they can be a nice sweet after dinner treat for a few days, even up to a week. You won’t believe the taste and the fact that there’s only a handful of ingredients is just a bonus.

The paleo diet encourages you to skip weighing and measuring yourself and if at all encourages you to count nutrients as opposed to calories. So the only thing you should take into consideration when meal planning is making sure you’ll approximately cover your macronutrient needs and then simply eat as much as you feel like when it’s breakfast, lunch or dinner time.


A very hot oven quickly roasts the potatoes and finishes the chicken without overcooking. The simple oil mixture, using solely extra-virgin olive oil to keep it paleo-friendly, packs a ton of flavor without adding excessive calories or fat to an already flavorful dinner. To serve a family, double the recipe and use an additional sheet pan for added space. You can substitute fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise, for the small Yukon gold potatoes.
This cookbook companion to "The Paleo Approach" offers a wealth of information. It shows you how to make a smooth transition to the diet — whether you're a novice in the kitchen, on a tight budget or limited on time. Author Sarah Ballantyne specifically addresses readers with autoimmune diseases, yet "The Paleo Approach Cookbook" has universal appeal thanks to its user-friendly mix of flavorful recipes and insightful kitchen tips.
These burgers are inspired by Thanksgiving dinner. They’re made from turkey instead of beef or chicken, and are served with a cranberry aioli to invoke memories of cranberry sauce that’s served with the Thanksgiving turkey. But the most interesting thing about this recipe is the sweet potato buns made from fresh sweet potatoes instead of going without a bun. You don’t have to wait around until the holidays to enjoy the flavors you love.
You wouldn’t be able to eat traditional tabbouleh while following the Paleo diet because it’s made from bulgur, but you can have as much of this cauliflower tabbouleh as you want. Cauliflower is a very versatile food and is used in Paleo recipes to replace everything from rice, to pizza crusts. Here it works perfectly when mixed with other ingredients and spices that are usually found in tabbouleh. It has cilantro, lemon juice, lime juice, and tomatoes. The tomatoes will give it plenty of flavor as well as lycopene, vitamins, and minerals making this a healthy item to serve up alongside any meat dish.
How does pre-order work? If you order now, ahead of the January 6 release date, you’ll enjoy 25% savings off the cover price. Early bird gets the worm here! Then, when the book is finally released, it’ll be automatically shipped to you. Bonus: Usually pre-ordered books arrive a few days before the actual release date, though that isn’t a promise. Pre-orders are handled through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, Google Play or IndieBound.
Description: Now, whether you are a curious healthcare professional or just a connoisseur of diet information, two New York Times best-selling authors provide you with the definitive resource for low carbohydrate living. Doctors Volek and Phinney share over 50 years of clinical experience using low carbohydrate diets, and together they have published more than 200 research papers and chapters on the topic. Particularly in the last decade, much has been learned about the risks associated with insulin resistance (including but not limited to metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type-2 diabetes), and how this condition is far better controlled by carbohydrate restriction than with drugs.
If you like to start your day with granola, most other versions you see on store shelves will not be approved on the Paleo diet. You’ll need construct your own granola recipe using Paleo foods such as nuts, seeds, dried fruits, and spices like cinnamon, and pumpkin spice. This gives you the ability to customize the granola according to your own taste as well as make sure you are only using high quality ingredients. You’ll want to avoid eating it with yogurt as well, as that’s a dairy product. Try it with almond milk as a delicious and nutritious substitute that’s dairy free.
This book promises that you won’t be just a caveman following recipes, but that you’ll actually learn how to cook with the information they provide. It would be nice to become something of a master at cooking Paleo dishes, and with the simple, high-quality ingredients you find on the Paleo approved foods list there’s no reason why you can’t accomplish this goal. This is billed as a Paleo cooking masterclass, so you can get comfortable with the idea of cooking your own awesome foods, and leaving doubt and hesitation behind. Get the notion that Paleo is easy to follow by getting a crash course in how to do it right.
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