Anytime you keep things simple you’ll be keeping them Paleo. Think about it: early man didn’t complicate things because they couldn’t complicate things. They had to use what was around them, whatever that would have been. They also didn’t have well-equipped kitchens like we have, so their cooking style would have been rudimentary, yet effective. This tomato soup only adds a few different items plus some seasonings to fresh, ripe tomatoes so it’s going to really pop in your mouth, and the tomato flavor will be front and center. Luckily we have things like immersion blenders to make quick work of the preparation process.
Skewered Lamb with Honey Glazed Carrots Pear And Bell Pepper Ground Beef Stir-Fry Garlic And Herb Steak Pepper Barbecue Sauce Grilled Steak Skewers Greek-Style Meatballs Simple Beef Shish Kabobs Steak Zucchini Boats Veal Rolls With Zucchini Skirt Steaks With Fresh Mango Salsa Swedish Style Meatballs Beef Sirloin With Fresh Herb Marinade Butternut Squash Lasagna Butternut Squash and Beef Stew Roast Beef with Portobello and Balsamic Sauce Korean Beef Short Ribs Meatball Bites With Spaghetti Squash Beef Sirloin Grilled In Spicy Tomato Sauce Steak and Cucumber Salad Ground Beef Tacos Aussie Burger BBQ Meatballs Balsamic Steak Rolls Pepper Steak Balsamic Roast Beef Taco-Stuffed Sweet Potatoes Taco pie Eggs Benedict burgers Beef Stroganoff
These recipes are created with ease in mind, as we’re often cooking for others and accommodating our busy schedules… but they also all taste amazing. These are the same recipes we take to barbecues and birthday parties to be enjoyed by several people with different tastes. You can be sure that you will enjoy cooking these recipes as much as you’ll enjoy eating them – and food is always better when shared!
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
Grilled Seabass with Caramelized Brussels Sprouts Thai Steamed Mussels Teriyaki-Style Salmon with Veggies Spicy Fish With Cabbage Slaw Spicy Grilled Jumbo Shrimp Fried Fish Tacos Buffalo Shrimp Lobster Salad with Taro Chips Asian Marinated Tuna with Shaved Salad Shrimp Ceviche with Tostones Halibut with Peach and Pepper Salsa Sesame Spiced Tuna Crispy Coconut Shrimp With Mango Sauce Rosemary-Skewered Scallops Crab Stuffed Shrimp Bacon-Wrapped Salmon Shrimp Burgers with Pineapple-Avocado Salsa Sweet Lemon Shrimp Orange-Rosemary Seared Salmon Smoked Salmon With Fresh Vegetables Tuna Burgers Spicy Tuna And Cucumber Bites Salmon Cakes Mussels in white wine sauce Fish tacos Creamy tomato baked scallops Shrimp in fruity salsa Garlic Shrimp With Zucchini Noodles
1. Crispy Plantains With Garlic Sauce: A staple of Caribbean cuisine, plantains are delicious fried or mashed. Ripe ones look similar to bananas and can be used in sweet dishes, while green ones mash and crisp up nicely. In this recipe, green plantains are parboiled, smashed and pan-fried, so the center remains soft while the edges provide crunch. The accompanying garlic-lime dipping sauce is sinfully delicious. (via Wellfed)
The paleo diet, also known as the caveman diet, is one based off ancient eating practices. The diet avoids foods that our early, early ancestors wouldn’t have been able to cook, like beans and grains, or foods that might have been unavailable, like milk or sugar. These easy dinners follow those guidelines, and feature hearty cuts of meat along with a focus on fresh vegetables and fruit. Everything from salads to soups to skillet dinners are made paleo diet friendly in this collection of weeknight dinners.
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.
Wondering what to eat on the Paleo diet? Explore PaleoPlan’s 450+ easy and delicious Paleo recipes—all absolutely free! Our recipes are a fast and healthy way to lose weight, feel better, and get in shape on the Paleo diet. From breakfast to dinner, we have a variety of meals for every occasion. With so many amazing recipe options to choose from, you’re sure to find a delicious, satisfying, and 100% Paleo diet meal that’s perfect for you, your family and friends.

Say hello to paleo and goodbye to stuffed sandwiches, right? Not so fast. Here’s an Italian roll-up with everything you love about a footlong. Vary the amount of greens in the middle of the roll as much as you like — the more you use, the more fiber. Substitute traditional mayo for the paleo-friendly version included in this recipe, or try pesto or hummus.
The chicken. The green sauce. The homemade sriracha. Some of Michelle Tam's recipes are a little more difficult than I like to attempt during a Whole30 (I prefer to keep it simple), but others are in heavy rotation (especially the green chicken and the Peruvian chicken). The Nom Nom app is amazing too — totally worth the price. You can also pre-order Michelle's next book, Ready or Not!, which is coming out in August 2017. Buy it here.

Quiche is usually fair game on the Paleo diet because it’s primarily made with eggs, and eggs are definitely a Paleo approved food. This particular quiche recipe includes plenty of delicious ingredients, and she’s topped it off with a zucchini hash crust so it’s crunchy on the top, and full of eggs and yummy vegetables on the bottom. All of the ingredients that are not Paleo in a traditional quiche have been removed and replaced with Paleo perfect items. Flax meal is used as an optional ingredient, and we’d suggest it since it adds beneficial omega-3s to the mix.
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
These Paleo pizza bites will blow you away with their pizza flavor. She’s managed to make them extra delicious even though there isn’t any cheese in them at all. They look like little baked meatballs, but the cool thing about them is the way they burst with flavor when you eat them. It’s the Italian sausage that gives them the intense flavor, as well as the accompanying ingredients like bell peppers and mushrooms, just like you’d find on a pizza.
Kelly is such a talented photographer. Her book makes me want to eat the food right off the page. Equally as good as the photography are her recipes. Kelly incorporates chocolate into each recipe so thoughtfully that we cooked from it all week and didn’t feel chocolated-out! The book is packed with delicious recipes for treats, but it also has a handful of savory recipes with a chocolate twist. If you enjoy chocolate even half as much as I do, then this book is a must-have!
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
The Summer Eats collection of recipes is unlike anything we’ve seen in the world of Paleo. These are like gourmet meals done in Paleo fashion, so you’ll feel like you’re getting well-fed, but keeping healthy at the same time. She’s gone for quality over quantity, so you won’t be inundated with hundreds of recipes, and in fact she’s providing just 16 recipes designed to knock your socks off. This is the type of recipe collection you’ll want to have on hand when you want a special meal, but don’t want to veer off your Paleo plan. She also provides recipes for clean cocktails, so you can enjoy a tasty beverage without packing on the calories and sugar.
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