This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.

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These coconut flour pancakes cook up just like traditional pancakes, except they are missing one ingredient found in almost every single pancake recipe: all-purpose flour. All the taste that you’d expect is there, and on Paleo you can use pure maple syrup to make this taste incredible. Also, you are free to have bacon as a side, which helps to complete a most delicious start to the day, and keeps this right in line with something you’d get as a breakfast at a restaurant or diner.Get used to using coconut flour, as it will become your new best friend on Paleo.
Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
This beef recipe is simple, but comes out delicious because of the way it is prepared. You get plenty of beef in the form of chuck roast, and it is recommended to use grass-fed beef in this recipe as well as any other beef recipe you follow while eating Paleo. It’s also using a few glasses of red wine, and a good portion of tomato paste. If you are concerned about the red wine, don’t worry, the alcohol burn away during the cooking process, leaving just the flavor behind. Between the resveratrol in the red wine, and the lycopene in the tomatoes, you are getting a very healthy meal here.

Two teaspoons of smoked paprika may seem like a lot, but it will help to form a nice crust on the pork as it sears in the pan. You can also sub 1 teaspoon ground cumin plus 1 teaspoon chipotle chile powder. A hot oven will help the sweet potato wedges crisp up on the outside without burning. Remove the pork from the oven just as it reaches 140. The temp will climb to an ideal 145, and the meat will be just right. This is paleo version of one of our favorite weeknight dinners.

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Description: ‘The Ketogenic Diet’ is a complete resource for anyone interested in low-carbohydrate diets (such as the Atkins Diet, Protein Power, Bodyopus or the Anabolic Diet). It looks objectively at the physiology behind such diets, including potential negative effects, and gives specific recommendations on how to optimize such a diet assuming an individual has chosen to do one. Two modified ketogenic diets (which involve the insertion of carbohydrates to sustain exercise performance) are also discussed in detail, along with specific guidelines. Exercise is discussed in great detail, including background physiology, the effects of exercise on fat loss, exercise guidelines and sample workouts. A great deal of basic physiology information, dealing with both nutrition and exercise topics, is included so that readers without a technical background will be able to understand the topics discussed.


Get into the habit of buying a butternut squash whenever you’re at the store. They’re so versatile and able to be used in so many ways, that you’ll have no trouble finding a Paleo friendly recipe to use it in. Here she’ll show you exactly how to take that big bulky squash and tame it so it becomes a tasty soup. If you’ve always avoided these types of squash because you didn’t know how to prepare it, now’s your chance to learn how, and it will be a skill you can use again and again when eating on the Paleo plan.

A trip to Brazil is just minutes away when you let this stew simmer. It’s loaded up with flavor thanks to citrus fruits, cayenne peppers, and fish sauce. There’s also a combination of white fish and shrimp, so you’re getting some good quality protein to make this a meal. And let’s not forget the veggies, which include tomatoes and onions, made all the more delicious by the seasonings and spices. The perfect dish to make when you want seafood but don’t want to turn on the oven.

What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.
Description: The Keto Cookbook is a cookbook for those using the diet to treat epilepsy and other neurologic conditions. The book contains 96 recipes grouped by breakfast and brunch, appetizers & snacks, lunch, dinner, and sweets and treats. The book includes a 16-page color insert illustrating each recipe. Since many children start the Keto Diet before they speak, the pictures of the meal and snack options allow children to choose what they want, helping overcome food refusal due to lack of variety of foods and/or child’s loss of control over food options. This book provides parents and children with options that have been tested and are kid- and Registered Dietitian- approved.

Perhaps you know this by the French name mille-feuille, but it also goes by Napoleon. Following a traditional mille-feuille recipe will get you into trouble on Paleo because of all the puff pastry and pastry cream that is used. Here they’ve made a faux version, and they’ve made it Paleo friendly so you won’t have to feel bad about eating it. The puff pastry has been replaced with almond flour, so no concerns about wheat or grains, and the filling is made with no dairy, using only ingredients commonly found in Paleo cooking and baking recipes.
Blueberry Chocolate Chia Parfait Apple Pie Muffins Cayenne-Rosemary Roasted Nuts Paleo Carrot Cake Fruit Banana Split Coconut Date Balls Pumpkin Pie Bites Banana Ice Cream Halloween Apple Mouths Strawberry Applesauce Chocolate Dipped Apples Apple Pie Baked Apples Chocolate Oranges Almond and Coconut Macaroons Mango Lime Gelatin Gummies Coconut Macaroons With Lemon Curd Frozen Easter Eggs Chocolate Kiwi Popsicles Sweet and Salty Chocolate Bark Coconut Tapioca Pudding Berry Crumble Pumpkin Pie Pudding Chocolate Banana Boats Almond and grape stuffed pears Coconut squares Chocolate avocado mousse with walnut crust Coconut vanilla ice cream Paleo dessert: baked and fried apples
The cooking methods, the kitchen equipment and the food culture in the illustrations are also based on archaeological finds. Even the clothes and the clay jars are finds from settlements or graves. The glass in the woman’s hand, for example, was found at an excavation site in Sweden. (Illustration: Communicating Culture & Atelier bunterhund Zürich)

When it comes to those recipes, a key advantage is the speed. Most options are designed to be fast to make. Likewise, the formatting of the recipes makes it easy to be efficient throughout the process. While the book doesn’t offer images of every recipe, there are more than enough photographs to keep the book interesting and to guide you on your cooking journey.


i didn't buy this, my wife did. but she doesn't rate anything and it will stay here until i do. I do like eating like a caveman, don't you. I mean they used a lot of truffle oil and eggs, high quality meat and of course real butter, none of that yucky margarine. Cavemen eat better than i am used to eating. Only the best, i don't know how they afforded it at the grocery store in paleolithic days but it probably only cost a couple of clams, right? we all watched the Flintstones.
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