Get into the habit of buying a butternut squash whenever you’re at the store. They’re so versatile and able to be used in so many ways, that you’ll have no trouble finding a Paleo friendly recipe to use it in. Here she’ll show you exactly how to take that big bulky squash and tame it so it becomes a tasty soup. If you’ve always avoided these types of squash because you didn’t know how to prepare it, now’s your chance to learn how, and it will be a skill you can use again and again when eating on the Paleo plan.
Courtney loves to share great wine, good food, and loves to explore far flung places- all while masting an everyday elegant and easy style. Courtney writes the popular creative lifestyle blog Sweet C’s Designs- a site devoted to delicious everyday recipes, home decor, crafts, DIY inspiration, and photography tips to help make your every day extraordinary.
5. Cassava Pizza Crust: Speaking of Italian comfort foods, you can still have pizza Fridays. This pizza crust is made of mashed cassava (also called yuca), which crisps up nicely (as our Caribbean friends who traditionally cook with yuca already know). Top it with your favorite veggies and nut cheese and you’re good to go. (via Predominantly Paleo)
Chef Gregory Gourdet prepares modern Asian cuisine at Portland's Departure Restaurant + Lounge. But at home, the Bikram yoga disciple and marathoner adheres strictly to the Paleo diet, which is rooted in whole foods and nutritionally dense ingredients. Here's how the chef-athlete gives a healthy, classic meat-and-vegetable combo an unexpected Southeast Asian flavor twist.
We get it. Being a mom is full-on and full-time. Equal parts FUN and WTF. Our kids don’t come with instructions, and it’s ok if we don’t have all the answers. We’ll figure it out together. The best advice comes from our favorite experts and doctors, trusted mom friends, and learning on the job. Get your coffee — or wine! — and tune in to hear us spill it all. We got this. This is MOM BRAIN with Hilaria Baldwin and Daphne Oz.
I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.
Even though this explanation of how most Paleo meals seem pretty simple and straightforward, it’s easy to get bored or to eat the same things over and over again. For this reason, I’ve decided to include here 10 easy Paleo recipes that can all be prepared in about 20 minutes or less and that call for very few ingredients, but still have something in them that makes them very special and tasty. I hope you’ll find here a new favorite that you’ll be able to prepare over and over again when you’re either on the go, not in the mood for cooking or simply because sometimes the simplest meals are really the best.
This recipe is inspired by Indochina cuisine and features chilli chicken that gets marinated in a special blend of spices. The red chillies are going to give this a pretty good spiciness to this dish, so if you don’t like spicy foods you may want to pass on this one, or make adjustments to the peppers, using ones that aren’t as potent. It’s served on a bed of cauliflower rice to keep it Paleo friendly. You’ll find that cauliflower is a versatile way to make rice and couscous replacements, and it satisfies your vegetable requirement.

The Paleo Kitchen is a New York Times Best Seller, USA Today Best Seller, and Globe Best Seller and is my second cookbook that I co-authored. We came together to create a cookbook with over 100 never before seen paleo recipes that represent the food we love and the food that makes us feel good. These recipes range from breakfast, to entrees, to drinks, to desserts.
Not surprisingly, Paleo for Beginners focuses on teaching people how to get started with a paleo diet. To do this, the author includes information about the diet itself and recommended foods, along with a transition plan, a shopping guide and, of course, the recipes themselves. The information provided isn’t as comprehensive as Practical Paleo, which was discussed earlier. Nevertheless, Paleo for Beginners does achieve its goal well and is effective if you want something a little more concise.
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.

Porridge is a nice way to start the day because it is warm, a little bit sweet, and it stays with you through the entire morning. But if you are following a traditional porridge recipe you won’t get too far while on Paleo. All of the necessary modifications have been made in this version so you can enjoy it without worrying if you are staying within the guidelines. Eggs, flour, coconut milk, and seasonings have combined to make one yummy porridge. This can serve as a standalone breakfast without any meat eaten at the same time. Paleo does focus on a meat and vegetable balance, but breakfast can be a lighter meal.
This mackerel recipe uses a pound of fresh mackerel with the skin left on. It is advertised as being served with a magic sauce and without taking any of the magic away we can tell you that it’s made with sherry, honey, some vinegar, and fresh ginger so it’s going to taste incredible, without using any ingredients that will set you back on your progress. On Paleo you may see yourself eating more fish than you used to eat, because it is such a healthy meat, and something our ancestors surely would have eaten. They have it served on a bed of cauli-rice, a rice substitute made from cauliflower.

The answer: Pick up this book. Ready or Not! makes healthy Paleo home cooking a breeze, no matter if there’s time to prepare or just minutes to spare. Whether you’re a fastidious planner or a last-minute improviser, you’ll find plenty of deliciously nourishing options, from make-ahead feasts and treats to lightning-fast leftover makeovers and make-now meals. Presented in Nom Nom Paleo’s deliriously fun comic book style, Ready or Not!’s step-by-step recipes, photos, and meal plans make cooking a habit you’ll never want to break.

Steak and eggs are two of the cornerstones of Paleo so why not enjoy them together for even more goodness. This combination though is not new and steak & eggs have been enjoyed for a long time, either in the morning for breakfast or at night for dinner. It also couldn’t really get simpler than this. This is a single recipe, but calculate about two eggs per steak. You can enjoy your eggs pretty much the way you like them usually, but in this recipe the classic sunny side up eggs are prepared. I like to make it so the yolks are still runny and can drip on my steak, enhancing flavor and texture at the same time.
Crackling with humor and bursting with flavor, Nom Nom Paleo offers a fun, fresh approach to cooking with whole, unprocessed ingredients free of grains, legumes, and added sugar. New York Times bestselling authors Michelle Tam and Henry Fong have cooked up a visual feast with their debut cookbook, featuring more than 100 foolproof Paleo recipes and over 900 step-by-step photographs and cartoons. There’s something for everyone here, whether you’re a busy mom, a triathlete in training, or a lifelong foodie who’s curious about the “caveman” approach to eating.

Sweet potatoes will likely become one of the foods you find yourself using a lot of when eating Paleo. That’s because they can be cooked up in so many different ways, and they also serve as a great replacement to white potatoes. In this soup they’ll add a creamy texture, as well as lots of flavor. They go great with bell peppers, and their choice of lemon and thyme can’t be beat. The great part is that they used leftover mashed sweet potatoes for this soup, which takes out a lot of the prep work and lets you get to the cooking and the eating faster.
These apple chips are baked, not fried, so you’re already coming out on top compared to eating a bag of potato chips. Since you won’t be eating potatoes on Paleo it’s good to come up with a better alternative. These apple chips will have a sweetness to them, satisfying both your crunchy cravings as well as your sweet tooth. The best part is they only use two ingredients, apples and cinnamon, so there’s never any doubt as to whether these are healthy or not. Paleo isn’t very fruit centric, but you should be having at least one serving of fruit per day, and this can be it.
Fruit is a popular choice for a dessert when eating the Paleo way because it’s naturally sweet, and will provide you with a serving of fruit that you should be getting each day. It’s easy enough to doctor up the fruit with some naturally sweet things like honey or coconut sugar, and in this recipe they’ve taken peaches, grilled them to unlock the flavor, and then topped them with coconut cream. This means you’re getting a sweet, flavorful, creamy dessert without any dairy, or any refined sugar. Walnuts are added to the top for a crunchy addition that also adds healthy fat.

Here’s another complete paleo meal in one “container.” The red bell peppers get cooked to mellow sweetness, but still hold their shape enough to keep other delicious ingredients inside. This recipe, with its peppers and tomatoes, is a great source of vitamins A and C, even after the vitamin loss that cooking causes. It’s also a good source of protein (4 ounces of lean turkey has over 20 grams).


Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)

Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.

One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
A very hot oven quickly roasts the potatoes and finishes the chicken without overcooking. The simple oil mixture, using solely extra-virgin olive oil to keep it paleo-friendly, packs a ton of flavor without adding excessive calories or fat to an already flavorful dinner. To serve a family, double the recipe and use an additional sheet pan for added space. You can substitute fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise, for the small Yukon gold potatoes.
Grandmas may have spent hours perfecting their versions of meatballs (and we love 'em for it!), but in these busy times, slaving over a stove may not be on the agenda. Expedite your meatball-making with these breadcrumb-free, baked-not-fried pork and beef spheres, drowned in a homemade marinara sauce. You won’t believe it only takes about 30 minutes for the whole thing to come together.
A chicken salad sandwich sounds great for lunch, but the sandwich part is out of the question if you’re eating paleo. This recipe for a healthy alternative adds a fiber boost in the form of diced vegetables, like radishes and cabbage. If you pack along four or five large butter lettuce leaves, you can leave your fork at home and scoop up the chicken with them.
New to the Paleo Diet? Experienced with Paleo but running out of recipe ideas? Below is our ultimate collection (the ENTIRE Paleohacks recipe archive) of all of our recipes for a tasty Paleo breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, drinks, desserts, side dishes, and condiments. This archive will be updated on a monthly basis as we publish new recipes, so make sure to bookmark this page and keep checking back!
The Big Book of Paleo Slow Cooking: 200 Nourishing Recipes That Cook Carefree, for Everyday Dinners and Weekend Feasts contains a variety of recipes—everything from quick, easy weeknight meals to more complicated dishes to prepare on weekends or holidays. The meals incorporate international flavors, all while using common ingredients. There’s also a pantry stocking section that will help you stock up on paleo-approved ingredients.
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