5. Cassava Pizza Crust: Speaking of Italian comfort foods, you can still have pizza Fridays. This pizza crust is made of mashed cassava (also called yuca), which crisps up nicely (as our Caribbean friends who traditionally cook with yuca already know). Top it with your favorite veggies and nut cheese and you’re good to go. (via Predominantly Paleo)
I used to think that I could accomplish all my goals with food. If I ate a certain amount or a certain type of food, I could control everything. That worked for a while until my life started unraveling from ignoring the whole picture. Now I understand the importance of a balanced approach in all areas of life. These wellness articles will allow me to share all the aspects I share to create the life I love.
Meatloaf is one food you don’t have to give up while following the Paleo diet. The great thing about meatloaf is everyone usually likes it enough to make it a regular menu item. In this version it has been miniaturized so that you don’t end up making one big loaf, but rather individual-sized portions so that everyone gets a nice outer crust, and it avoids the problem of soggy or crustless middle section pieces. You’ll notice that the breadcrumbs have been done away with as they aren’t allowed on the Paleo diet. You won’t notice they’re gone because there’s coconut flour instead.

Just because it comes from a can doesn’t mean that you can’t prepare something really delicious out of canned salmon. After all, we are fortunate enough that farmed salmon doesn’t hold well to the canning process so we are blessed with an easy and cheap source of wild salmon year-round. In this recipe, I use olive oil and lemon juice, but homemade mayonnaise is also excellent.

These burgers have been doctored up in a number of ways. First they have figs cooked right into them, and the figs get finely chopped so you won’t even notice the texture. They give the burgers a sweet tartness, which is then combined with the savory and unmistakable flavor of bacon. The bacon they’re using is specifically sugar-free, which many people don’t realize that sugar is added to conventional bacon packs found in stores. Paying attention to the foods that you’re eating is a big part of Paleo, and you want to exert quality control on everything that goes into your body.

Making a pizza crust from cauliflower is something you just have to try if you haven’t yet. You’ll be surprised that a vegetable can double as a pizza crust, and even more surprised to learn that it actually tastes good. This pizza makes use of bacon, so it has an unfair advantage on your taste buds. There’s also spinach as a topping, so you’re definitely covered in the vegetable department. Coconut flour helps the cauliflower turn out like a pizza crust, so you won’t be focused on that while you’re eating and you can focus on the bacon.
I think liver and onions are secretly best friends and the combination even has the potential to make someone love liver. The caramelized onions are very simple to prepare and this recipe doesn’t need anything else to be a complete meal. Liver by itself is so full of nutrients that it could be considered Mother Nature’s multi-vitamin. I enjoyed liver and onions for ages before I learned that the combination is actually a classic in many European countries and is enjoyed all over the world. The ingredient list really couldn’t be shorter.
This book was written by Natalie Perry, a widely known and extremely respected Paleo blogger. This cookbook is massive with more than two hundred recipes that cover all sorts of different Paleo ingredients. Those ingredients include appetizers, snacks, desserts, soups, chilis, meats, seafood, vegetables, and even some staple pantry items. The exclusive recipes included in this cookbook seem to be mostly drawn from Asian, Latin, and Middle Eastern culinary roots.
Description: Building upon this critical work in Good Calories, Bad Calories and presenting fresh evidence for his claim, Taubes now revisits the urgent question of what’s making us fat—and how we can change—in this exciting new book. Persuasive, straightforward, and practical, Why We Get Fat makes Taubes’s crucial argument newly accessible to a wider audience.
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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