Chef Gregory Gourdet prepares modern Asian cuisine at Portland's Departure Restaurant + Lounge. But at home, the Bikram yoga disciple and marathoner adheres strictly to the Paleo diet, which is rooted in whole foods and nutritionally dense ingredients. Here's how the chef-athlete gives a healthy, classic meat-and-vegetable combo an unexpected Southeast Asian flavor twist.
These are sirloin rolls have brussel sprouts and fennel as sidekicks, but the sirloin is going to get top billing as the star of the show. Making sirloin rolls can be tricky unless you know how to do it, and they’ve provided helpful instructions here so yours will come out looking just like theirs. They have bacon rolled up with the sirloin, so you’re going to get plenty of flavor, and it’s nice that they have matched all of this meat with Brussels sprouts, one of the healthiest vegetables around.
If you’re trying this eating approach, you’ll have to say goodbye not only to foods well known to be unhealthy — such as ice cream, potato chips, and soda — but also all grains (including whole grains), most dairy, legumes (beans), and starchy veggies, among other foods. The thinking goes that foods in these elimination groups are toxic to our bodies because of modern farming practices.

Salmon tastes great and it is one of the top recommended foods you can eat while following the Paleo diet. This is because it is loaded with plenty of omega 3’s, as well as healthy fats that your body needs to function at its best. In this recipe she has made things very simple, which only serves to bring out the natural flavor of the salmon. She has it topped with slices of lemon, and also capers are used for subtle flavoring. All that’s needed is a vegetable dish to go with it to make it just right so you don’t get the munchies late at night before bedtime.
This Japanese beef dish uses bamboo as one of the vegetables. Trying new things is part of the Paleo process, and if you’ve never had bamboo shoots now is a good time to start. They are full of potassium and vitamins and taste good, especially with beef. There are also other vegetables like green beans and spinach to balance out the beef, and his preparation is easy to follow so you can make this just like he did. You can usually find bamboo shoots in the International section of a grocery store, of you may need to visit an Asian food mart.
This meatloaf is billed as being packed with plenty of pork flavor, and that’s because they’re using bacon to top things off. What most people don’t understand is that Paleo is equal parts meat and vegetables, even though this meatloaf has a bacon topping, it is also packed with a pound of spinach. The 50/50 ratio of meat to vegetables is important to help your digestive system process all the meat, and to stick to a hunter-gatherer ratio. If it was a meat-centric diet it wouldn’t be very healthy, and it wouldn’t be in line with what our ancestors were eating in the Stone Age.
Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.
In "The Zenbelly Cookbook," Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly dishes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.
i didn't buy this, my wife did. but she doesn't rate anything and it will stay here until i do. I do like eating like a caveman, don't you. I mean they used a lot of truffle oil and eggs, high quality meat and of course real butter, none of that yucky margarine. Cavemen eat better than i am used to eating. Only the best, i don't know how they afforded it at the grocery store in paleolithic days but it probably only cost a couple of clams, right? we all watched the Flintstones.
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