This cookbook is a little franker than most, which isn’t that obvious from the cover. In particular, you’ll find the odd expletive in place and much of the writing is more conversational than other cookbooks. To me, this makes for a fun book, especially as it also has many stunning photos of the food that you’ll be making. But, some people simply don’t like the approach.
We're not entirely certain about the history of this classic recipe's name, but perhaps it has something to do with the spicy kick of the sauce. Our version is a shakshuka-like dish in which fiery harissa paste and heady spices slowly infused a rich tomato sauce where eggs gently poach. Look for jars of harissa with the Middle Eastern foods in your supermarket; you can substitute a half to full teaspoon of crushed red pepper in a pinch. The cook time for the eggs depends on the specific heat of your slow cooker. We offer a range of 15 to 20 minutes, so start checking at 15 minutes (or a couple minutes earlier) to ensure the eggs get done to your liking. 
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)

According to reviewers, Paleo in 28 is a good starter guide for eliminating processed foods from your diet. Many say it has helpful guides on basic paleo principles and reviewers note that the meals are delicious, too. A few people say that the shopping guides aren’t the best, but overall, this paleo cookbook is a helpful resource if you’re just starting out on the diet.
Brandi currently lives in Kansas City, Missouri and is a self-taught cook and fitness enthusiast. She has focused on healthy recipe development and exercise for 5+ years after reaching a fitness plateau and struggling to lose weight and maintain body goals. Brandi’s goal is to share recipes and workouts that support a consistently healthy lifestyle.
This Paleo diet recipe has a traditional Italian feel to it thanks to the use of Italian sausage and the spices it is packed with. It then takes it one step further with pesto, an item that you can make on your own following a Paleo friendly pesto recipe. There are also plenty of nourishing foods like baby spinach, and tomatoes, so you’re getting a fair amount of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. You can easily omit the mozzarella if you’re nixing all cheese per the official Paleo stance on cheese, but these are fresh mozzarella balls, and you may find they’re easier to digest.
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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