These gummy orange slices are really great because they don’t use any sugar, but they come out just like a piece of gummy candy, with natural orange flavoring throughout. Gelatin is something that you can definitely have while on the Paleo diet, and they’re making full use of it here. Of course real oranges account for the orange taste, which is a recurring theme with Paleo, it uses natural and basic ingredients to accomplish its flavor goals.You’ll have to decide for yourself if you want to use the food coloring to make this look orange, and if so how orange you want it to be. Paleo purists wouldn’t use any food coloring.
With Paleo it is important to use the proper amount of spices and seasonings so that you don’t get tired of just eating meat and vegetables all the time. In this recipe they have an interesting mix of spices, and use plenty of lime so you’ll get a citrusy, spicy flavor. It starts off with chicken thighs and breasts, and then coats it all in olive oil so the spices will stick to the meat better. They’re using coriander, cumin, garlic powder, black pepper, red pepper flakes, and sea salt so this is definitely not lacking in the flavor department.
Some paleo cookbooks solely contain recipes, but you might be looking for a bit more information about the lifestyle if you’re a beginner. In this case, you should definitely look into Paleo in 28: 4 Weeks, 5 Ingredients, 130 Recipes by Kenzie Swanhart. This paleo cookbook for beginners will ease you into the diet, providing week by week guides to get you on the path to healthier living.
These gummy orange slices are really great because they don’t use any sugar, but they come out just like a piece of gummy candy, with natural orange flavoring throughout. Gelatin is something that you can definitely have while on the Paleo diet, and they’re making full use of it here. Of course real oranges account for the orange taste, which is a recurring theme with Paleo, it uses natural and basic ingredients to accomplish its flavor goals.You’ll have to decide for yourself if you want to use the food coloring to make this look orange, and if so how orange you want it to be. Paleo purists wouldn’t use any food coloring.
"Paleo Home Cooking" caters to gluten-free newbies and veterans alike. Author Sonia Lacasse clearly lays out which foods you'll target, which you may occasionally indulge in and which you must "absolutely, positively stay away from." Among its 150 delectable recipes are homemade nut butters, naturally sweetened desserts, salads to last all week and scrumptious seafood and meat dishes, such as Hearty Meatballs in Wild Mushroom Sauce or Paleo Moussaka with creamy eggplant, spicy lamb and béchamel sauce.
Nevertheless, this is one paleo cookbook that slightly varies the diet. In particular, the author’s definition of paleo includes both potatoes and rice. There is a coherent argument provided for why this is the case and many paleo followers do agree. Still, the decision won’t sit well with everybody on a paleo diet, so it is something to bear in mind.
You might have heard about the paleo diet by now — a way to eat based on how our hunter-gatherer ancestors (read: cavemen) did it back in the day. While going paleo eliminates some tasty modern options like breads, pastas, and other grains, along with legumes, dairy, and soy, it emphasizes other delectable, whole foods that provide various health benefits.

A true labor of love, "Mediterranean Paleo Cooking" is a collaborative effort from nutritionist Caitlin Weeks and her Algerian chef husband, Nabil Boumrar. Together, they explore the flavors of Boumrar's native North Africa, offering an array of gluten-free, Paleo-friendly recipes such as cinnamon-braised beef, almond meatball soup and spicy chicken tagine. Staples like falafel, moussaka, hummus and pita bread are also included, along with multicourse menu plans — providing home cooks with the necessary tools for a Mediterranean-themed dinner party.

The book does also have a wide selection of different types of recipes, including dinners, desserts and snacks. This is both a good and a bad thing, depending on what you’re looking for. In particular, the style is great for variety. But, if you’re specifically looking for main meals, you may be disappointed, as a significant proportion of the recipes are for snacks and desserts.
Say hello to paleo and goodbye to stuffed sandwiches, right? Not so fast. Here’s an Italian roll-up with everything you love about a footlong. Vary the amount of greens in the middle of the roll as much as you like — the more you use, the more fiber. Substitute traditional mayo for the paleo-friendly version included in this recipe, or try pesto or hummus.
Like the previous example, Nourish is focused on paleo recipes that are also relevant for people with autoimmune conditions. In this case, there are 120 recipes on offer and no shortage of images to inspire. The cookbook also has detailed information about why food is relevant to the body’s immune response and the types of food that you need to consider.
With over 200 recipes, all Paleo friendly, you know you’re in for a treat with the Caveman Feast. All you need to do to get a feel for the type of quality recipes you’re going to get is check out the ones he’s providing for free at his Civilized Caveman site. You can only imagine that he’s saving the best for this compilation, and to sweeten the deal he’s including a series of bonuses that give you plenty of information right from the top authoritative sources on what’s Paleo and what isn’t. So cut out all of the contradictory information and get down to the real meat, literally and figuratively.
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