Against All Grain is one of the most popular series for paleo cooking out there and this book is one interesting entry. The idea with this particular book is easy meals that can be made for dinners throughout the week. The cookbook also includes tips and tricks about getting the best outcomes, along with shopping lists to help people plan effectively. The cookbook is also visually stunning, with many photos to inspire you.
If Indian food is one of your favorite cuisines be sure to try out this fried beef recipe, which gets the Paleo seal of approval. It’s made with hearty chunks of beef stew meat, and has a list of seasonings you may have to go shopping for, but it will be worth it. These include turmeric and garam masala, both of which will act to give it that distinct Indian flavor. The meat is marinated, and then sauteed, with spices and seasonings added to both steps, so you know that this is going to knock your socks off, and the meat will be tender and flavorful.
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This Paleo cookbook really is ultimate; the title doesn't lie! Altogether, ten experienced Paleo chefs and bloggers came together to create this amazing, extensive resource for anyone in need of some quality Paleo recipes. There's even an entire chapter dedicated to making the Paleo diet easy with almost eighty fast and simple recipes. There are plenty of great Paleo cookbooks, but this is probably the only one that truly deserves to be called "ultimate." In total, ten popular Paleo bloggers contributed to the creation of this cookbook.
Fruit is a popular choice for a dessert when eating the Paleo way because it’s naturally sweet, and will provide you with a serving of fruit that you should be getting each day. It’s easy enough to doctor up the fruit with some naturally sweet things like honey or coconut sugar, and in this recipe they’ve taken peaches, grilled them to unlock the flavor, and then topped them with coconut cream. This means you’re getting a sweet, flavorful, creamy dessert without any dairy, or any refined sugar. Walnuts are added to the top for a crunchy addition that also adds healthy fat.

While paleo's most vocal advocates include committed athletes and fitness-first type of people, that doesn't mean that the benefits of eating paleo are limited to hardcore workout junkies. Paleo is great for anyone who wants pretty simple guidelines and feels their best on a diet rich in protein, fat, and greens. We always recommend eating the way that works best for you; there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Paleo is a great way to dip into clean eating, and with some trial and error you should be able to decide if it's an approach that works for you.

Brownies usually require mixing up the batter, baking it, then letting them cool just long enough so you can take a bite. But these brownie bites require no baking, so it’s just a matter of mixing up the batter, rolling it into a ball, and digging in. The nice part about these are that you can store them in the fridge and they keep really well, so they can be a nice sweet after dinner treat for a few days, even up to a week. You won’t believe the taste and the fact that there’s only a handful of ingredients is just a bonus.
Here’s another complete paleo meal in one “container.” The red bell peppers get cooked to mellow sweetness, but still hold their shape enough to keep other delicious ingredients inside. This recipe, with its peppers and tomatoes, is a great source of vitamins A and C, even after the vitamin loss that cooking causes. It’s also a good source of protein (4 ounces of lean turkey has over 20 grams).
In many ways, the most interesting thing about this cookbook isn’t the recipes but the other information that is provided. With this cookbook, the authors strongly focus helping people to transition to the paleo diet and then stick with it in the long-term. This type of information can be particularly useful because the paleo diet is often overwhelming, especially when people first get involved.
This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.

Apples are one of the healthiest fruits you can have, and are something our ancestors would have eaten anytime they came upon an apple tree. Here they’re filled with tasty things like raisins, brandy, cinnamon, and nutmeg, all baked right inside a cored apple. This means that the flavor gets infused right into the apple, which softens up during the baking process. Giving up dessert is not necessary on Paleo, it’s simply a matter of changing your idea of what dessert has to be. You’re getting a healthy and satisfying dessert here with no added sugar.
This recipe idea came from her, she has a staple chicken salad recipe that she makes weekly, and we get really creative with 100 million ways we can eat it. After finding these completely Paleo wraps, we decided to stuff them with her chicken salad. It was deeelicious. I love all different kinds of chicken salad. I actually have another Chicken Salad Recipe on my blog, which is a bit more complicated. This one that I’ll share today is much easier and perfect to make each week. 

These pork chops are made on the grill, so they are going to seal in all of the delicious grilled flavor. Plus they have added a nice mustard coating on it, so you’re going to have a bit of spiciness here as well as the flavor from the pork. They topped it off with basil apricot relish so there will be a sweetness to balance out the mustard, and sweet fruits like apple sauce are often paired with pork chops because they simply go really well together. You’ll want to make sure that you get a vegetable with this. It’s nice to have some fruit with it, but vegetables get top rank along with meat.
This salsa chicken is advertised as being very simple, which will help you whip it up and get it in the crockpot quickly so you can get on with your day. Imagine getting this ready in the morning in just a few minutes, and coming home at the end of the day to a fully cooked meal ready to be eaten. That’s the concept here and she pulls it off nicely with organic salsa, chicken breast, a bit of chili powder, and an onion. We recommend you don’t serve this with a side salad to help make it a complete meal, as it’s a bit light on the vegetables.
The Big Book of Paleo Slow Cooking: 200 Nourishing Recipes That Cook Carefree, for Everyday Dinners and Weekend Feasts contains a variety of recipes—everything from quick, easy weeknight meals to more complicated dishes to prepare on weekends or holidays. The meals incorporate international flavors, all while using common ingredients. There’s also a pantry stocking section that will help you stock up on paleo-approved ingredients.
At its most basic, Paleo meal construction is in itself very simple. Simply fry, bake, stew or poach a nice piece of good quality meat, fish or seafood and then steam, bake or boil a side of fresh or frozen vegetables, making sure to add a good amount of tallow, butter, Ghee, lard, coconut oil or olive oil in the process for taste, energy and health. The process is similar for making delicious stews or omelets: choose your source of protein and your favorite vegetables and cook them in a fresh stock in the case of a stew or with eggs in the case of an omelet. Of course, on top of all this, onions are almost always welcome, as are fresh and dried spices. As you get used to playing more and more with the different flavors available to you, you’ll create amazing dishes without even thinking about it.
The Nom Nom Paleo book brings humor and play into the kitchen. Created by Michelle Tam and Henry Fong, the married couple behind the Nom Nom Paleo food blog, this book contains over 100 foolproof recipes in this paleo diet cookbook that are great for all the family. Just in case gorgeous photos aren’t enough, this book also comes with cute cartoons.
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Now, paleo cookbooks are somewhat tricky. The challenge is that there are many individual variations on the paleo diet. For example, some people argue that specific types of dairy (such as grass-fed and organic butter) can be included, while most people disagree. As a result, it’s still important to pay attention to the specifics of any recipe or cookbook, even if it claims to be paleo.
Isn’t it awesome just how many foods you can have with Paleo. There’s virtually nothing that’s off limits as long as you’re using the right ingredients. In this version of the classic chocolate cream pie, the regular crust has been replaced with an almond-based crust so you’ll get more fiber and protein from the crust that you would with any flour-based crust. The chocolate is from cacao paste and isn’t filled with dairy or refined sugar. A perfectly chocolatey and healthy pie!
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
This burger is made with mushroom caps instead of a bun, and it is designed to mimic the flavors of a Philly steak sandwich, only in burger form. It is made from slices of sirloin, so it’s using Green me, and of course has all of the necessary ingredients that go into a Philly steak, such as a bell peppers in multiple colors, and an onion. They’re using lard to fry it all up in, so this is going to be one flavor-filled burger. Cutting out the bread is a facet of Paleo that many followers struggle with, but if you use substitutes like they are here, the process is easier.
These gummy orange slices are really great because they don’t use any sugar, but they come out just like a piece of gummy candy, with natural orange flavoring throughout. Gelatin is something that you can definitely have while on the Paleo diet, and they’re making full use of it here. Of course real oranges account for the orange taste, which is a recurring theme with Paleo, it uses natural and basic ingredients to accomplish its flavor goals.You’ll have to decide for yourself if you want to use the food coloring to make this look orange, and if so how orange you want it to be. Paleo purists wouldn’t use any food coloring.
This meatloaf is billed as being packed with plenty of pork flavor, and that’s because they’re using bacon to top things off. What most people don’t understand is that Paleo is equal parts meat and vegetables, even though this meatloaf has a bacon topping, it is also packed with a pound of spinach. The 50/50 ratio of meat to vegetables is important to help your digestive system process all the meat, and to stick to a hunter-gatherer ratio. If it was a meat-centric diet it wouldn’t be very healthy, and it wouldn’t be in line with what our ancestors were eating in the Stone Age.
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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