If you want to try a Japanese-style burger without traveling to Japan, this is your ticket. They’re using organic grass-fed ground beef from Trader Joe’s, an excellent way to start off any burger recipe. From there they add onion, garlic, an egg, and some seasoning to get these just right. They then pan fry them, and they give the instruction of not squeezing them during the cooking process because they’ll end up dry. You can flip them as needed, but when it’s all said and done these retain their round shape. To make it even more Japanese themed you can use soy sauce during the cooking process.

I think liver and onions are secretly best friends and the combination even has the potential to make someone love liver. The caramelized onions are very simple to prepare and this recipe doesn’t need anything else to be a complete meal. Liver by itself is so full of nutrients that it could be considered Mother Nature’s multi-vitamin. I enjoyed liver and onions for ages before I learned that the combination is actually a classic in many European countries and is enjoyed all over the world. The ingredient list really couldn’t be shorter.


How does pre-order work? If you order now, ahead of the January 6 release date, you’ll enjoy 25% savings off the cover price. Early bird gets the worm here! Then, when the book is finally released, it’ll be automatically shipped to you. Bonus: Usually pre-ordered books arrive a few days before the actual release date, though that isn’t a promise. Pre-orders are handled through Amazon, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, Google Play or IndieBound.

You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
​For anyone with special kitchen tools, you'll understand how difficult it can sometimes be to find recipes specific to the equipment you have. However, for those of you who own an Instant Pot, you don't have to worry about that anymore! This cookbook, written by Jennifer Robins, includes 80 different Paleo recipes created with your Instant Pot specifically in mind.
 Citrus Steak Marinade  Paprika-Lemon Chicken marinade  Alabama-Style White Barbecue Sauce  Avocado Vegetable Dip Orange And Cranberry Relish Blueberry-Peach Salsa Chunky Apple Ketchup Fire-Roasted Salsa Mayonnaise, Revisited Melon Salsa Cranberry Relish Sardine and roasted garlic spread Asparagus pesto Strawberry balsamic vinaigrette Red Pepper Dip Homemade Paleo condiments Salad dressing and vinaigrettes Homemade Pesto Baba Ghanoush Paleo Mayonnaise Mexican Salsa verde Quick and Easy Guacamole Sriracha Sauce

The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.

Hey, great recipe and site!! FYI, The Paleo Kitchen cookbook has a mayo recipe that is SOOOO much easier…you take 3/4 cut oil of your choice, 1 egg, lemon juice(1 tsp I think), and 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard, place them in a tall, narrow container, and use an immersion blender! Start at the bottom and move the blender upward as the ingredients emulsify. I had quit making my own mayo because the other way was SO time consuming and mine never seemed to come out right, but this version is pretty fool-proof! I use grapeseed oil because the olive oil is a bit bitter for me.
You don’t have to subject yourself to the Orange Chicken made by a fast food place anymore, you can stay on the Paleo path and still have a delicious orange chicken when you get the notion. that’s because it gets its sweetness from honey, and its orange flavor from oranges, so nothing artificial goes into it. The use of ginger, chili sauce, and garlic means you’ll still be getting the classic taste, but this method gives you control over the quality of ingredients you’re using, especially the chicken, which you can use organic free range chicken.

Hey Amanda, I’d love to try this as well. I’m not sure if they will freeze well, but I don’t see why not. I think freezing the chicken salad would be smarter, and taking that out on a Sunday and just packing those up for the week and storing in the fridge may be better. The wraps probably don’t freeze well. But for most of my once a month cooking, it always requires a bit of assembling the week of! Does that make sense?
Here's a recipe that plays on Thai cuisine’s marriage of sweet and salty flavors, but in a purely paleo, sugar-free way. Microwave for a hot lunch, or enjoy it cold, as you would a meat-based salad. Pork is a fatty meat, although the fat content varies by cut. Be sure to choose a lean cut, which will get you a good amount of protein, as well as vitamin B12, which supports nerve health.
This is Paleo’s answer to the tortilla soup you used to love ordering in restaurants, but can’t have anymore because it likely contains beans. Beans are a no-no on Paleo, and this soup recipe deftly avoids them, but still delivers on the flavor you are wanting. This actually is very well-balanced for a Paleo dish, and if you eat enough of it, it can be a meal all by itself. If you just want a cup it can serve as a nice appetizer for a Mexican main dish. We love that this is topped with avocado, one food you should definitely start eating more of if you don’t already.
A key selling point of The Healing Kitchen is that it goes beyond the basic paleo diet. Instead, the authors also focus on providing information and inspiration about cooking for people with a chronic illness or autoimmune diseases. This approach is powerful for anybody who focuses on food as medicine, especially as the meals we eat can play a large role in our health.
At its most basic, Paleo meal construction is in itself very simple. Simply fry, bake, stew or poach a nice piece of good quality meat, fish or seafood and then steam, bake or boil a side of fresh or frozen vegetables, making sure to add a good amount of tallow, butter, Ghee, lard, coconut oil or olive oil in the process for taste, energy and health. The process is similar for making delicious stews or omelets: choose your source of protein and your favorite vegetables and cook them in a fresh stock in the case of a stew or with eggs in the case of an omelet. Of course, on top of all this, onions are almost always welcome, as are fresh and dried spices. As you get used to playing more and more with the different flavors available to you, you’ll create amazing dishes without even thinking about it.
One of the best features of this book is that it has pairing and variations of ingredients that you can use. And if you're going Paleo, sometimes it can be hard to pick what ingredients are Paleo "compatible" that are available on your cupboard or available in a local grocery near you. The meals are easy to prepare and delicious. This book emphasizes on meal planning and preparation which helps you save a lot of time.​
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