Here's a recipe that plays on Thai cuisine’s marriage of sweet and salty flavors, but in a purely paleo, sugar-free way. Microwave for a hot lunch, or enjoy it cold, as you would a meat-based salad. Pork is a fatty meat, although the fat content varies by cut. Be sure to choose a lean cut, which will get you a good amount of protein, as well as vitamin B12, which supports nerve health.

Now, paleo cookbooks are somewhat tricky. The challenge is that there are many individual variations on the paleo diet. For example, some people argue that specific types of dairy (such as grass-fed and organic butter) can be included, while most people disagree. As a result, it’s still important to pay attention to the specifics of any recipe or cookbook, even if it claims to be paleo.


This book was written by Natalie Perry, a widely known and extremely respected Paleo blogger. This cookbook is massive with more than two hundred recipes that cover all sorts of different Paleo ingredients. Those ingredients include appetizers, snacks, desserts, soups, chilis, meats, seafood, vegetables, and even some staple pantry items. The exclusive recipes included in this cookbook seem to be mostly drawn from Asian, Latin, and Middle Eastern culinary roots.
You’ll be happy to learn that you can have Thai curry on the Paleo diet, as long as you follow a recipe that’s been adjusted accordingly. This may not follow the traditional recipe exactly, but all of the distinct flavors are there, thanks to the use of full-fat coconut milk. They’ve used plenty of chicken, and have included an assortment of vegetables like zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, and asparagus. There’s even kale thrown in for even more nutrients. Really as long as you’ve got the curry paste and the coconut milk you’re well on your way to a successful replication.
If Indian food is one of your favorite cuisines be sure to try out this fried beef recipe, which gets the Paleo seal of approval. It’s made with hearty chunks of beef stew meat, and has a list of seasonings you may have to go shopping for, but it will be worth it. These include turmeric and garam masala, both of which will act to give it that distinct Indian flavor. The meat is marinated, and then sauteed, with spices and seasonings added to both steps, so you know that this is going to knock your socks off, and the meat will be tender and flavorful.
In many ways, the most interesting thing about this cookbook isn’t the recipes but the other information that is provided. With this cookbook, the authors strongly focus helping people to transition to the paleo diet and then stick with it in the long-term. This type of information can be particularly useful because the paleo diet is often overwhelming, especially when people first get involved.
As the name suggests, this paleo cookbook specifically targets people who are training while also on the paleo diet. This could include many different groups of people, including those who participate in sports, bodybuilders and individuals who simply want to increase their muscle mass. The overall style works well, especially for people who are already interested in performance but are new to paleo.
Lately, I've been seeing more and more people talking about the Paleo diet and the best paleo cookbooks - and for a good reason. Although a lot of diets can often get complicated and hard to understand, the Paleo diet is pretty simple: only eat what a caveman would eat. What's better than being able to eat as much as you want and not have to track anything? Nothing! That's what I thought.
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
This recipe is inspired by Indochina cuisine and features chilli chicken that gets marinated in a special blend of spices. The red chillies are going to give this a pretty good spiciness to this dish, so if you don’t like spicy foods you may want to pass on this one, or make adjustments to the peppers, using ones that aren’t as potent. It’s served on a bed of cauliflower rice to keep it Paleo friendly. You’ll find that cauliflower is a versatile way to make rice and couscous replacements, and it satisfies your vegetable requirement.
I had planned on photographing a bunch of the recipes myself, but there's been little time since we moved plus the food goes too fast around here! So here are some of my favorite recipes in the book, using George's photos. Everything we've ever tried from the Civilized Caveman has been incredible and this book is no different. My Eggs Benedict over Savory Waffles is also included in the book so make sure to look for it! You'll also get a bonus package of all of his best pumpkin recipes for Halloween and Thanksgiving. Plus he backs your purchase with a 60-day money back guarantee in case you're not satisfied. You never find that in the ebook world and I think that's incredibly generous!
This Paleo cookbook really is ultimate; the title doesn't lie! Altogether, ten experienced Paleo chefs and bloggers came together to create this amazing, extensive resource for anyone in need of some quality Paleo recipes. There's even an entire chapter dedicated to making the Paleo diet easy with almost eighty fast and simple recipes. There are plenty of great Paleo cookbooks, but this is probably the only one that truly deserves to be called "ultimate." In total, ten popular Paleo bloggers contributed to the creation of this cookbook.
The author presented the facts logically and the book felt well researched. The recipes were varied and easy to execute. I've looked through a lot of Paleo cookbooks, so it's not often I come across much that is truly unique, but this cookbook had quite a few recipes I hadn't found versions of before! The meals look easy to make and the diet as a whole is presented in such a way that it doesn't feel intimidating. While I do not intend to adopt a complete paleo diet, I do intend to incorporate several of the concepts and make more of the recipes. And I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to start eating paleo or who wants to add more recipes to their diet. I only wish this book came with beautiful color pictures. A cookbook without pictures or with very little pictures is kind of boring to me. First you eat with your eyes, then you eat with your stomach ;)
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