The cover for this cookbook may make it seem fairly unappealing. But, as is often the case, that concept isn’t accurate at all. Instead, Nom Nom Paleo is a very popular paleo cookbook, with more than 100 different recipes on offer. Unusually, the cookbook has considerably more images than recipes, meaning you get amazing visual instructions of the entire cooking process.
This is the worst cook book I have ever bought. Every recipe I have tried so far has had errors. It will either give a list of ingredients and then fail to tell you what to do with one of them or like the one i am cooking right now...it tells you to roast the chicken at 475 for 25 minutes and then reduce the temperature and continue to cook 45 minutes....ummmm what temp should a person reduce it to? Good thing I consider myself a good cook and know what a whole chicken bakes nicely at. But for some people this could be really frustrating and it is for me when I am in a hurry to make a meal for my family. Buyer beware. Im sure there are better Paleo cookbooks out there.
2013 was a BIG year for Paleo! The movement has really grown, with lots of new blogs and tons of new cookbooks! I know that many of you have decided to give Paleo a try in the new year, so I have made a list of all my favorite cookbooks for you. Having a few Paleo cookbooks on hand is really helpful for staying on track and keeping your meals interesting.
Feeling full and fulfilled when you’re on a diet may seem impossible, but it’s the only way to turn your diet into a healthy lifestyle. Naturally promoting superior health and weight control, The Paleo Cookbook serves up wholesome recipes from around the world that emphasize lean proteins, vegetables, fruits and healthy fats. A staple for any paleo table, The Paleo Cookbook gives you your fill of a healthy and balanced life with every dish.

Chicken parmesan is not something that you would typically be having on Paleo because it is coated in bread crumbs. But this chicken parm is coated with Parmesan cheese and almond flour, which replaces the bread crumbs. You’ll still get that classic crunchy outer covering on the chicken, and of course the Parmesan will be baked right onto the chicken, so it’s just a matter of getting the other ingredients right. For the tomato sauce they are using garlic, oregano, and olive oil, and you can top it off with basil leaves and optional mozzarella cheese.
The main limitation to mention is the layout. In particular, the overall design and font size means that some parts of the recipes are hard to read – especially if you’re trying to follow the recipe while cooking. The problem may not be dramatic for everybody but it would be a particularly significant issue for anybody with even minor vision challenges.

Nevertheless, this is one paleo cookbook that slightly varies the diet. In particular, the author’s definition of paleo includes both potatoes and rice. There is a coherent argument provided for why this is the case and many paleo followers do agree. Still, the decision won’t sit well with everybody on a paleo diet, so it is something to bear in mind.
The Big Book of Paleo Slow Cooking: 200 Nourishing Recipes That Cook Carefree, for Everyday Dinners and Weekend Feasts contains a variety of recipes—everything from quick, easy weeknight meals to more complicated dishes to prepare on weekends or holidays. The meals incorporate international flavors, all while using common ingredients. There’s also a pantry stocking section that will help you stock up on paleo-approved ingredients.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
I think liver and onions are secretly best friends and the combination even has the potential to make someone love liver. The caramelized onions are very simple to prepare and this recipe doesn’t need anything else to be a complete meal. Liver by itself is so full of nutrients that it could be considered Mother Nature’s multi-vitamin. I enjoyed liver and onions for ages before I learned that the combination is actually a classic in many European countries and is enjoyed all over the world. The ingredient list really couldn’t be shorter.
This is hands down the best Paleo recipe guide you can get for the money, and there isn’t even a close second. It has over 350 recipes that show you how to cook with all of the wholesome foods you should be eating, and deftly avoids all of the junk that mucks up your system and makes you sluggish and fat. It’s laid out in such a manner that you can clearly see what you’ll need, and how to make it. There’s even an 8 week autopilot meal plan that takes out all of the guesswork to make this caveman simple to follow.
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