This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.
Meatloaf is one food you don’t have to give up while following the Paleo diet. The great thing about meatloaf is everyone usually likes it enough to make it a regular menu item. In this version it has been miniaturized so that you don’t end up making one big loaf, but rather individual-sized portions so that everyone gets a nice outer crust, and it avoids the problem of soggy or crustless middle section pieces. You’ll notice that the breadcrumbs have been done away with as they aren’t allowed on the Paleo diet. You won’t notice they’re gone because there’s coconut flour instead.
Paleo Chicken Pot Pie Soup Slow Cooker Beef And Rutabaga Stew Curried Cauliflower And Kale Soup Cream of Mushroom Soup Creamy Onion Soup Cauliflower Chowder Cream of Chicken and Leek Soup Beef and Winter Vegetable Soup Slow Cooker Sweet Potato Soup Curried Acorn Squash Soup Wild Mushroom Soup Coconut Lime Chicken Soup Cream of Zucchini Soup Creamy Zucchini And Mushroom Soup Chunky Meat and Vegetable Soup Tomato Soup Carrot Potage Ham and Pumpkin Soup Turban Squash Soup Turnip, Potato, And Pear Soup Beet and Tomato Soup Mexican chicken soup Roasted Cauliflower And Sweet Potato Soup Leek and sweet potato soup Creamy Chicken And Vegetable Soup Sweet potato and sausage soup Butternut squash soup Roasted Cauliflower Soup
Most commercial goods will be off limits while you’re on the Paleo diet because they are filled with processed ingredients, grains, chemicals, and other foods that just aren’t able to make the cut while eating the Paleo way. These spiced scones do a good job of replacing the pumpkin spiced scones you find at your local Starbucks when the season is right. The trick is they don’t use any ingredients that aren’t on the Paleo list of approved foods, so you’re totally in the clear. Isn’t it great that Paleo minded chefs are hard at work to bring you guilt-free recipes like these?
Make-ahead meals work well in so many situations, especially for people who have busy households or simply don’t have much time for cooking. This particular cookbook takes advantage of that concept and directly applies it to paleo cooking. In it, the author offers 85+ different recipes, which are designed so that they can be easily frozen and reheated. Likewise, many of the recipes use a slow cooker, which can act as another way to save time.
Most tacos come in a corn tortilla, but these paleo tacos are wrapped in a crisp lettuce leaf. Serve them as an easily packed lunch “sandwich” or as cocktail hour finger food. A 3-ounce serving of skirt steak provides almost half a milligram of vitamin B6, nearly 40 percent of your daily need. People with poor kidney function or with malabsorption conditions like celiac disease especially need to be sure they’re getting enough B6.
When I first stumbled across his site, I remember telling you all that his recipes were for the man's man. They are also incredibly useful for the gal whose husband is getting sick of salads and things that don't fill him up, like myself! I lack a lot of hearty dinner recipes on my site, and especially lack  grilling recipes – all of which George is the master of. My list of desserts and snacks far outweighed the savory list, so I'm working on beefing that up for you for the cookbook! George can also can sling a pretty mean Paleo baked good though, so this book is a one stop shop. Oh and he loves all things bacon so you can't lose.
Brownies usually require mixing up the batter, baking it, then letting them cool just long enough so you can take a bite. But these brownie bites require no baking, so it’s just a matter of mixing up the batter, rolling it into a ball, and digging in. The nice part about these are that you can store them in the fridge and they keep really well, so they can be a nice sweet after dinner treat for a few days, even up to a week. You won’t believe the taste and the fact that there’s only a handful of ingredients is just a bonus.
These recipes are created with ease in mind, as we’re often cooking for others and accommodating our busy schedules… but they also all taste amazing. These are the same recipes we take to barbecues and birthday parties to be enjoyed by several people with different tastes. You can be sure that you will enjoy cooking these recipes as much as you’ll enjoy eating them – and food is always better when shared!
Steak and eggs are two of the cornerstones of Paleo so why not enjoy them together for even more goodness. This combination though is not new and steak & eggs have been enjoyed for a long time, either in the morning for breakfast or at night for dinner. It also couldn’t really get simpler than this. This is a single recipe, but calculate about two eggs per steak. You can enjoy your eggs pretty much the way you like them usually, but in this recipe the classic sunny side up eggs are prepared. I like to make it so the yolks are still runny and can drip on my steak, enhancing flavor and texture at the same time.
On nights I want to guarantee both cooking and cleanup are a total breeze, I lean on recipes that come together with a single pot, pan, or skillet. One-pan is basically kitchen code for "easy" — something you can totally appreciate when you're following a Paleo diet. Since the diet makes eating out and ordering in kind of tricky (although not impossible), it requires a lot of cooking. So why not keep delicious grain- and dairy-free dinners as simple as possible, with one of these 15 recipes that come together in a single pot, pan, or skillet?
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
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Devotees of the paleo diet believe that the way our paleolithic ancestors ate—mostly protein, fat, and fibrous vegetables, and no processed food—is what our bodies are best adapted to metabolize. The paleo diet champions high-quality meats, such as grass-fed beef, and seafood as well as heart good fats and an abundance of produce. Many advocates report higher energy and a greater overall sense of well-being while on the diet. We encourage you to consult your physician or dietitian to determine if paleo is right for you.
We mentioned two other cookbooks in the Against All Grain series earlier but this one here is the original book that started it all off. In this case, the cookbook offers 150 different recipes, all of which fall under the paleo diet. For many people, the cookbook would be a great place to start, especially as the recipes have been tried by so many different people since it was first released.
This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.
You’ll be happy to learn that you can have Thai curry on the Paleo diet, as long as you follow a recipe that’s been adjusted accordingly. This may not follow the traditional recipe exactly, but all of the distinct flavors are there, thanks to the use of full-fat coconut milk. They’ve used plenty of chicken, and have included an assortment of vegetables like zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, and asparagus. There’s even kale thrown in for even more nutrients. Really as long as you’ve got the curry paste and the coconut milk you’re well on your way to a successful replication.
One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
The recipes are hands down, amazing. Every Paleo foodie needs this book on their shelf. The skill level seems to range from simple to intermediate. There are some recipes that you can whip up for a weeknight meal and many others that you can impress dinner guests with. Many of the recipes are ethnic-inspired and they all burst with flavor. When reading this book, it feels like you are hanging out with Michelle and her family learning directly from them about how to eat like a real-food-foodie!
In "The Zenbelly Cookbook," Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly dishes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.

Hi Monica! I love your site! I’m 22 years old and also from Mandeville, LA! I’m looking into healthier eating ideas so I can help my parents and myself lose some unwanted pounds! They are very hard to motivate to eat healthier and I think the best way to help them would be to cook for them. (I’m in nursing school at LSU and living at home so I think this is the best time to help them with a much needed change)! I’m not a big fan of mayo but I was wondering if this Paleo version was healthier/tastier than regular store bought mayo? Or if you had any other ideas for things I could replace mayo with for this recipe? I’m going to have to go to Vive soon! I’ve seen it a million times and have never stopped in! Thanks so much!!
This paleo soup is perfect for ushering in fall: It's hearty enough for the beginning of soup season, yet brothy and veggie-packed so that it doesn't feel too heavy. Pair it with a slaw or kale side salad for a light, satisfying dinner. This recipe is ideal for a weekend, when you can check on the slow cooker after just a few hours; though you won't be able to leave the soup unattended all day, this still offers the benefit of hands-free, fuss-free cooking.
Our Paleo Meal Plan is for anyone interested in eating unprocessed, whole foods, and is willing to adhere to some fairly stringent restrictions. Paleo can fit into a variety of lifestyles, and can be a good choice for athletes, those looking to increase energy levels, or people who want to eliminate processed foods from their diet. If you need to restrict intake of protein or fat for health reasons, a paleo diet may not be right for you.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.
Here are more than 200 recipes you can have at your side as you venture into Paleo and determine what it is you’re supposed to be eating. You can expect leaner muscles while eating these meals, as well as more energy and more mental clarity, all without having to suffer through hunger pangs and cravings like you get with a diet. That’s because they remind you that Paleo isn’t really a diet at all, and with the sort of meals they have you making here you won’t feel like you’re missing out on anything. Quite the opposite, you’ll actually feel like you’re indulging.
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