Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
If you love the taste of curry but don’t know how to make it, this soup can serve as a reliable way to get that flavor without having to memorize a difficult recipe or use curry from a jar. There are plenty of ingredients being used here, but you’ll see in the directions that it’s just a matter of combining them all together, so it’s not complicated. You end up with an amazing curry soup that has interesting things like almonds in it to give it a crunch you don’t usually get with curry. They’re also giving it healthy fat and additional protein which is very helpful.
This meatloaf is billed as being packed with plenty of pork flavor, and that’s because they’re using bacon to top things off. What most people don’t understand is that Paleo is equal parts meat and vegetables, even though this meatloaf has a bacon topping, it is also packed with a pound of spinach. The 50/50 ratio of meat to vegetables is important to help your digestive system process all the meat, and to stick to a hunter-gatherer ratio. If it was a meat-centric diet it wouldn’t be very healthy, and it wouldn’t be in line with what our ancestors were eating in the Stone Age.
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)

One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.


You’ll get over 120 recipes in this highly rated book that shows you how to cook up Paleo food for you as well as your family. If you’ve ever wanted a “diet” where you don’t have to count calories, or eat specially labeled diet foods, Paleo is the way to go and this book is the way to get started. It has information that has been peer reviewed and time tested and is sure to teach you at least something about Paleo that you didn’t know. The recipes are laid out in a manner that is easy to follow, so you’ll be sure to stick with it and learn the right way to do things.
At its most basic, Paleo meal construction is in itself very simple. Simply fry, bake, stew or poach a nice piece of good quality meat, fish or seafood and then steam, bake or boil a side of fresh or frozen vegetables, making sure to add a good amount of tallow, butter, Ghee, lard, coconut oil or olive oil in the process for taste, energy and health. The process is similar for making delicious stews or omelets: choose your source of protein and your favorite vegetables and cook them in a fresh stock in the case of a stew or with eggs in the case of an omelet. Of course, on top of all this, onions are almost always welcome, as are fresh and dried spices. As you get used to playing more and more with the different flavors available to you, you’ll create amazing dishes without even thinking about it.
Salmon tastes great and it is one of the top recommended foods you can eat while following the Paleo diet. This is because it is loaded with plenty of omega 3’s, as well as healthy fats that your body needs to function at its best. In this recipe she has made things very simple, which only serves to bring out the natural flavor of the salmon. She has it topped with slices of lemon, and also capers are used for subtle flavoring. All that’s needed is a vegetable dish to go with it to make it just right so you don’t get the munchies late at night before bedtime.
This is a wonderful green bean salad that will be bursting with flavor. Go with organic green beans and you’ll be able to tell the difference in how they taste. The additional ingredients are all Paleo inspired, with walnuts as a source of healthy fat, something that you’re supposed to get enough of each day you’re on Paleo. She’s also using a red onion, and olive oil. Olive oil is additional healthy fat, and the Paleo diet is one of the few diets out there that places such a primary importance on getting healthy fats into your body.
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Chicken parmesan is not something that you would typically be having on Paleo because it is coated in bread crumbs. But this chicken parm is coated with Parmesan cheese and almond flour, which replaces the bread crumbs. You’ll still get that classic crunchy outer covering on the chicken, and of course the Parmesan will be baked right onto the chicken, so it’s just a matter of getting the other ingredients right. For the tomato sauce they are using garlic, oregano, and olive oil, and you can top it off with basil leaves and optional mozzarella cheese.
Tacos can be tricky to make Paleo, but they’ve figured out a good way here by using portobello mushroom caps for the shells. These caps do a good job of holding all of the yummy taco-inspired ingredients, and by the time you finish one of these you’ll feel satisfied, and like you just had Taco Night. The thick texture of the mushrooms means you can pile on the taco toppings and you won’t have to worry about breaking the shell.
This dish shows you how to cook up a simple, yet delicious Paleo stir fry that has only a few main ingredients, but is not short on flavor. It has bell peppers, chicken, some soy sauce, chili powder, and is fried up in coconut oil, so while it may seem like a basic recipe, it actually is full of flavor. This makes a great meal to cook up whenever you need a quick dinner, or lunch and want to keep things light. It is easily adaptable as well, you can use any vegetables you happen to have on hand in order to complete it or build on it.
This recipe idea came from her, she has a staple chicken salad recipe that she makes weekly, and we get really creative with 100 million ways we can eat it. After finding these completely Paleo wraps, we decided to stuff them with her chicken salad. It was deeelicious. I love all different kinds of chicken salad. I actually have another Chicken Salad Recipe on my blog, which is a bit more complicated. This one that I’ll share today is much easier and perfect to make each week. 

Make-ahead meals work well in so many situations, especially for people who have busy households or simply don’t have much time for cooking. This particular cookbook takes advantage of that concept and directly applies it to paleo cooking. In it, the author offers 85+ different recipes, which are designed so that they can be easily frozen and reheated. Likewise, many of the recipes use a slow cooker, which can act as another way to save time.
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
The chicken. The green sauce. The homemade sriracha. Some of Michelle Tam's recipes are a little more difficult than I like to attempt during a Whole30 (I prefer to keep it simple), but others are in heavy rotation (especially the green chicken and the Peruvian chicken). The Nom Nom app is amazing too — totally worth the price. You can also pre-order Michelle's next book, Ready or Not!, which is coming out in August 2017. Buy it here.
Oh, that’s weird. Maybe you are reacting to something your weren’t eating before starting this diet? I suggest trying to write down everything you eat and how you feel after every meal and about an hour after the meal and then try find a pattern for the bloating. It took me a while for example to figure out I react with horrible heartburn when I eat tomato sauce. Anything containing tomato sauce is super hard for me to digest.

Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.
For busy commuters, it is easy to get in the rut of eating hard boiled eggs every morning.  This book will help you keep both your breakfasts and lunches exciting, even with a busy work schedule. The recipes are not only delicious and healthy, they are easy to make. In addition, Diana is a nutritional therapist and offers the reader tons of practical tips on how to follow a Paleo diet, including a guide for eating out!
The Paleo Approach: Reverse Autoimmune Disease and Heal Your Body, by Sarah Ballantyne, PhD. This book is billed as a solution for autoimmune diseases, in which the body’s immune system attacks its own cells. In the text, Ballantyne discusses her own struggles with autoimmune disease and helps guide readers on how the paleo diet may help relieve their symptoms, too.
In "The Zenbelly Cookbook," Simone Miller draws on her experience as a chef and caterer to ease the transition to preparing Paleo meals. Besides great insider tips, from choosing the right knife to julienning a carrot, Miller provides a primer on ingredient measurements and an instructive breakdown of recipes. Her family-friendly dishes and refreshing menu ideas make creating a Paleo feast a breeze.
Not paleo specifically, but this gorgeously designed book is full of plant-forward recipes that are either Whole30-compliant already or require a little bit of adaptation to fit into the plan. At any rate, I always welcome extra inspiration when it comes to vegetables, so I love paging through this one. The photography and design is really stunning and makes me want to eat zucchini ribbons all day. Buy it here.
Before you skip over this recipe because peanuts are a Paleo no-no, rest assured that the blogger actually used almond butter to fit the diet’s requirements. Here, the life-extending stuff is stirred with sesame oil and just a touch of maple syrup before covering a batch of spiralized zucchini. (If zoodles can stand in for Italian pastas, they can get in on Asian-inspired dishes too.)
Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.

This is a Fruit Roll-Up knock off that will give you a serving of actual fruit rather than a bunch of artificial ingredients and commercial sweeteners. The cool thing is she uses three different types of fruit in these, with apples, strawberries, and grapefruit making an appearance. Making it look like a strip of leather is easier than you think, and she walks you through the steps so you can make it look appetizing. And they’re great for kid’s lunches as well, so you can feel good about what they are snacking on.
You’ll be happy to learn that you can have Thai curry on the Paleo diet, as long as you follow a recipe that’s been adjusted accordingly. This may not follow the traditional recipe exactly, but all of the distinct flavors are there, thanks to the use of full-fat coconut milk. They’ve used plenty of chicken, and have included an assortment of vegetables like zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, and asparagus. There’s even kale thrown in for even more nutrients. Really as long as you’ve got the curry paste and the coconut milk you’re well on your way to a successful replication.

This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.

The idea behind the paleo diet is that the human digestive system can handle these unprocessed foods much better than it can digest modern-day products like dairy, grains, and sugars. Many people stand by this diet as an effective method for weight loss, cleaning eating, and overall healthy living. Though, as with many fad diets, this can be restrictive since you don't eat dairy or whole grains, so you should consult with your doctor before trying this or any other extreme diet. 
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