Stack these bacon breakfast sandwiches nice and tall and you’ll have a formidable breakfast you’ll want to slow down for. The key is starting with a Paleo-approved bread and using thick cut bacon. Cutting the bacon nice and thick gives it a different quality than typical breakfast bacon and you’ll get more meaty flavor in each bite. Top the bacon with an egg, and add in some fresh spinach so you’re getting a serving of veggies too.

Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
I love doing round up recipe posts. Rarely do people go past 2 pages on the blog, and with 29 pages of recipes, that’s A LOT of recipes you are missing out on. So I’m here for you, to help you not forget about some of the easiest recipes on my blog. All you need is less than 40 minutes and BOOM, you have a weeknight meal. No need to complain about eating paleo when it’s this simple.

Kirsty, with animal protein I’m a pretty picky. I buy at butchers where I trust in the quality. In my opinion there is a huge difference in taste and quality when it comes to animal protein. Grains and veggies I’m more lenient but never with animal protein. The cheapest way to get high quality meat is share a whole animal with friends or neighbors. The bacon we eat is from a pig I share with another 2 families. Once a year I get 1/3 and freeze it all. The bacon is incomparable to any grocery store bacon. I’d rather it less often.

Not surprisingly, Paleo for Beginners focuses on teaching people how to get started with a paleo diet. To do this, the author includes information about the diet itself and recommended foods, along with a transition plan, a shopping guide and, of course, the recipes themselves. The information provided isn’t as comprehensive as Practical Paleo, which was discussed earlier. Nevertheless, Paleo for Beginners does achieve its goal well and is effective if you want something a little more concise.

These burgers have been doctored up in a number of ways. First they have figs cooked right into them, and the figs get finely chopped so you won’t even notice the texture. They give the burgers a sweet tartness, which is then combined with the savory and unmistakable flavor of bacon. The bacon they’re using is specifically sugar-free, which many people don’t realize that sugar is added to conventional bacon packs found in stores. Paying attention to the foods that you’re eating is a big part of Paleo, and you want to exert quality control on everything that goes into your body.
Now, paleo cookbooks are somewhat tricky. The challenge is that there are many individual variations on the paleo diet. For example, some people argue that specific types of dairy (such as grass-fed and organic butter) can be included, while most people disagree. As a result, it’s still important to pay attention to the specifics of any recipe or cookbook, even if it claims to be paleo.

While paleo's most vocal advocates include committed athletes and fitness-first type of people, that doesn't mean that the benefits of eating paleo are limited to hardcore workout junkies. Paleo is great for anyone who wants pretty simple guidelines and feels their best on a diet rich in protein, fat, and greens. We always recommend eating the way that works best for you; there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Paleo is a great way to dip into clean eating, and with some trial and error you should be able to decide if it's an approach that works for you.
This is the worst cook book I have ever bought. Every recipe I have tried so far has had errors. It will either give a list of ingredients and then fail to tell you what to do with one of them or like the one i am cooking right now...it tells you to roast the chicken at 475 for 25 minutes and then reduce the temperature and continue to cook 45 minutes....ummmm what temp should a person reduce it to? Good thing I consider myself a good cook and know what a whole chicken bakes nicely at. But for some people this could be really frustrating and it is for me when I am in a hurry to make a meal for my family. Buyer beware. Im sure there are better Paleo cookbooks out there.
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