One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
If you’re trying this eating approach, you’ll have to say goodbye not only to foods well known to be unhealthy — such as ice cream, potato chips, and soda — but also all grains (including whole grains), most dairy, legumes (beans), and starchy veggies, among other foods. The thinking goes that foods in these elimination groups are toxic to our bodies because of modern farming practices.
This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.
The Big Book of Paleo Slow Cooking: 200 Nourishing Recipes That Cook Carefree, for Everyday Dinners and Weekend Feasts contains a variety of recipes—everything from quick, easy weeknight meals to more complicated dishes to prepare on weekends or holidays. The meals incorporate international flavors, all while using common ingredients. There’s also a pantry stocking section that will help you stock up on paleo-approved ingredients.
The one thing to note is that the complexity of the recipes is somewhat divisive. Some people feel that the recipes are simple and easy to follow, while others find them overly complicated. As is often the case, reality is somewhere in the middle. By paleo standards, the recipes aren’t too bad, especially given you need a good balance of macros to maximize performance. Nevertheless, if you are new to paleo, the recipes may seem a little confusing at first, although you would get used to them.

Yes, the egg is raw, and raw egg is perfectly safe to consume, so long as you trust the source of your eggs. Anything you buy from a grocery store should be set, and if you get them from the Farmer’s Market or grow your own, just make sure you wash the shell VERY WELL before using raw egg, as this is where most of the contaminate comes from. (The shell isn’t sterile, you crack the egg, the shell contacts the egg and leaves some salmonella behind, the egg is now unsafe)
If you thought pulled pork sliders were off the menu, you were wrong. You just have to find creative workarounds when you are making Paleo recipes. In this case they’ve replaced hamburger buns with sliced sweet potato, which gets the wheat out. They haven’t skimped on the pulled pork which is going to taste just like you’d expect it to if you ordered a pulled pork sandwich from a barbecue joint. Creativity is one of the main and factors when you are eating Paleo because nothing is really off limits, you just have to figure out how you can have it.
Chef Gregory Gourdet prepares modern Asian cuisine at Portland's Departure Restaurant + Lounge. But at home, the Bikram yoga disciple and marathoner adheres strictly to the Paleo diet, which is rooted in whole foods and nutritionally dense ingredients. Here's how the chef-athlete gives a healthy, classic meat-and-vegetable combo an unexpected Southeast Asian flavor twist.
This recipe is inspired by Indochina cuisine and features chilli chicken that gets marinated in a special blend of spices. The red chillies are going to give this a pretty good spiciness to this dish, so if you don’t like spicy foods you may want to pass on this one, or make adjustments to the peppers, using ones that aren’t as potent. It’s served on a bed of cauliflower rice to keep it Paleo friendly. You’ll find that cauliflower is a versatile way to make rice and couscous replacements, and it satisfies your vegetable requirement.
Brownies usually require mixing up the batter, baking it, then letting them cool just long enough so you can take a bite. But these brownie bites require no baking, so it’s just a matter of mixing up the batter, rolling it into a ball, and digging in. The nice part about these are that you can store them in the fridge and they keep really well, so they can be a nice sweet after dinner treat for a few days, even up to a week. You won’t believe the taste and the fact that there’s only a handful of ingredients is just a bonus.
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The recipes themselves cover many different types of dishes, including breakfast, drinks, snacks, desserts and, of course, main meals. With around 100 recipes in total, there is not a large number of recipes in any given category but that scarcely matters. Instead, the book acts as a great source of paleo recipes, regardless of your preferences for food.

These recipes are created with ease in mind, as we’re often cooking for others and accommodating our busy schedules… but they also all taste amazing. These are the same recipes we take to barbecues and birthday parties to be enjoyed by several people with different tastes. You can be sure that you will enjoy cooking these recipes as much as you’ll enjoy eating them – and food is always better when shared!


Isn’t it awesome just how many foods you can have with Paleo. There’s virtually nothing that’s off limits as long as you’re using the right ingredients. In this version of the classic chocolate cream pie, the regular crust has been replaced with an almond-based crust so you’ll get more fiber and protein from the crust that you would with any flour-based crust. The chocolate is from cacao paste and isn’t filled with dairy or refined sugar. A perfectly chocolatey and healthy pie!

Hi Monica! I love your site! I’m 22 years old and also from Mandeville, LA! I’m looking into healthier eating ideas so I can help my parents and myself lose some unwanted pounds! They are very hard to motivate to eat healthier and I think the best way to help them would be to cook for them. (I’m in nursing school at LSU and living at home so I think this is the best time to help them with a much needed change)! I’m not a big fan of mayo but I was wondering if this Paleo version was healthier/tastier than regular store bought mayo? Or if you had any other ideas for things I could replace mayo with for this recipe? I’m going to have to go to Vive soon! I’ve seen it a million times and have never stopped in! Thanks so much!!

This sweet potato is stuffed with beef and blueberries, a combination that you may not have ever seen before. They all combine to form a very well-balanced Paleo meal, and you’re getting tons of antioxidants both from the blueberries and the sweet potatoes. The beef gives you protein, while sweet potatoes are a carbohydrate that is digested slowly by the body. There is just as much sweet potatoes as there is beef, with just a bit of blueberries added for good measure. This makes for a microcosm of what it’s like to eat a perfectly portioned Paleo meal.
When it comes to those recipes, a key advantage is the speed. Most options are designed to be fast to make. Likewise, the formatting of the recipes makes it easy to be efficient throughout the process. While the book doesn’t offer images of every recipe, there are more than enough photographs to keep the book interesting and to guide you on your cooking journey.
This is the worst cook book I have ever bought. Every recipe I have tried so far has had errors. It will either give a list of ingredients and then fail to tell you what to do with one of them or like the one i am cooking right now...it tells you to roast the chicken at 475 for 25 minutes and then reduce the temperature and continue to cook 45 minutes....ummmm what temp should a person reduce it to? Good thing I consider myself a good cook and know what a whole chicken bakes nicely at. But for some people this could be really frustrating and it is for me when I am in a hurry to make a meal for my family. Buyer beware. Im sure there are better Paleo cookbooks out there.
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