Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
Make-ahead meals work well in so many situations, especially for people who have busy households or simply don’t have much time for cooking. This particular cookbook takes advantage of that concept and directly applies it to paleo cooking. In it, the author offers 85+ different recipes, which are designed so that they can be easily frozen and reheated. Likewise, many of the recipes use a slow cooker, which can act as another way to save time.
Lately, I've been seeing more and more people talking about the Paleo diet and the best paleo cookbooks - and for a good reason. Although a lot of diets can often get complicated and hard to understand, the Paleo diet is pretty simple: only eat what a caveman would eat. What's better than being able to eat as much as you want and not have to track anything? Nothing! That's what I thought.
The one thing to note is that the complexity of the recipes is somewhat divisive. Some people feel that the recipes are simple and easy to follow, while others find them overly complicated. As is often the case, reality is somewhere in the middle. By paleo standards, the recipes aren’t too bad, especially given you need a good balance of macros to maximize performance. Nevertheless, if you are new to paleo, the recipes may seem a little confusing at first, although you would get used to them.

Juli Bauer’s Paleo Cookbook is my third cookbook that I could not be more proud of, more excited for, and more in love with. A cookbook that is filled with not only over 100 recipes I am excited to show the world, but a book that showcases my realistic viewpoints on overall health. This book was created to inspire others to turn around their health through food, through exercise, and through positivity. To me, paleo is not only about changing your body and your health, but it’s about how it makes you feel: the energy it gives you, the confidence you find, and the way it helps you shine from within. Here’s where you can find the book:

They’ve taken the approach of using meat to replace the crust of the pizza, which cuts out the grains and makes this one meaty pizza pie. The crust is made from Italian sausage, so it’s going to be massively flavorful, and a little spicey. They recommend using a sugar-free pizza sauce, which on Paleo you don’t want to eat any refined sugar, so this is a good recommendation to follow. They’ve made sure to include a bunch of vegetables in this “meatizza” so you are still going to get your nutritional needs met, in addition to all of that meat.
This Paleo diet recipe has a traditional Italian feel to it thanks to the use of Italian sausage and the spices it is packed with. It then takes it one step further with pesto, an item that you can make on your own following a Paleo friendly pesto recipe. There are also plenty of nourishing foods like baby spinach, and tomatoes, so you’re getting a fair amount of phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals. You can easily omit the mozzarella if you’re nixing all cheese per the official Paleo stance on cheese, but these are fresh mozzarella balls, and you may find they’re easier to digest.

These recipes are created with ease in mind, as we’re often cooking for others and accommodating our busy schedules… but they also all taste amazing. These are the same recipes we take to barbecues and birthday parties to be enjoyed by several people with different tastes. You can be sure that you will enjoy cooking these recipes as much as you’ll enjoy eating them – and food is always better when shared!

Anytime you keep things simple you’ll be keeping them Paleo. Think about it: early man didn’t complicate things because they couldn’t complicate things. They had to use what was around them, whatever that would have been. They also didn’t have well-equipped kitchens like we have, so their cooking style would have been rudimentary, yet effective. This tomato soup only adds a few different items plus some seasonings to fresh, ripe tomatoes so it’s going to really pop in your mouth, and the tomato flavor will be front and center. Luckily we have things like immersion blenders to make quick work of the preparation process.
Katie Wells, CTNC, MCHC, Founder and CEO of Wellness Mama, has a background in research, journalism, and nutrition. As a mom of six, she turned to research and took health into her own hands to find answers to her health problems. WellnessMama.com is the culmination of her thousands of hours of research and all posts are medically reviewed and verified by the Wellness Mama research team. Katie is also the author of the bestselling books The Wellness Mama Cookbook and The Wellness Mama 5-Step Lifestyle Detox.
Apples are one of the healthiest fruits you can have, and are something our ancestors would have eaten anytime they came upon an apple tree. Here they’re filled with tasty things like raisins, brandy, cinnamon, and nutmeg, all baked right inside a cored apple. This means that the flavor gets infused right into the apple, which softens up during the baking process. Giving up dessert is not necessary on Paleo, it’s simply a matter of changing your idea of what dessert has to be. You’re getting a healthy and satisfying dessert here with no added sugar.
Yes, the egg is raw, and raw egg is perfectly safe to consume, so long as you trust the source of your eggs. Anything you buy from a grocery store should be set, and if you get them from the Farmer’s Market or grow your own, just make sure you wash the shell VERY WELL before using raw egg, as this is where most of the contaminate comes from. (The shell isn’t sterile, you crack the egg, the shell contacts the egg and leaves some salmonella behind, the egg is now unsafe)
This breakfast casserole is something the whole family can enjoy, even if they are not following Paleo. It’s made with plenty of thick strips of bacon, and it also has parsnips and plenty of eggs in it, with coconut oil being used to cook it up. You’ll find that many breakfast casseroles will incorporate hash browns into the recipe, but potatoes are not allowed on Paleo so you want to avoid these recipes and find alternative ways to get the same effect. In this case they are using parsnips as a replacement to give it the bulk and texture it needs.
This is a beautifully photographed book, full of mouthwatering recipes. I recommend this to anyone that is starting out on the Paleo diet. The recipes are interesting, but approachable. There is such a wide variety of recipes, ranging from classics to ethnic-inspired. There is also a large dessert and baked goods section, for those of you that have a sweet tooth or really miss some of your old favorites.
Against All Grain - Danielle Walker is the author of this New York Times Bestseller. She has battled autoimmune disease for a very long time using modern-day medicine. This is when she decided to take matters on her own hand by allowing food to be her medicine. She has mastered grain-free, gluten-free and dairy-free cooking which has allowed here to eliminate her ailments. 
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