This Paleo cookbook really is ultimate; the title doesn't lie! Altogether, ten experienced Paleo chefs and bloggers came together to create this amazing, extensive resource for anyone in need of some quality Paleo recipes. There's even an entire chapter dedicated to making the Paleo diet easy with almost eighty fast and simple recipes. There are plenty of great Paleo cookbooks, but this is probably the only one that truly deserves to be called "ultimate." In total, ten popular Paleo bloggers contributed to the creation of this cookbook.
Shepherd’s pie is a popular dish in the UK, but not so much in the States. It’s a shame because it’s very delicious, but it is also made with a lot of ingredients that aren’t necessarily Paleo if it’s made the traditional way. This recipe makes plenty of adjustments so that a Paleo eater can enjoy comforting food. For starters they’ve gotten rid of white potatoes that play such a big role, and replace them with sweet potatoes which are a recommended Paleo food because they are loaded with antioxidants and fiber. The other ingredients all fall well within your Paleo guidelines, so you can eat until satisfied.
Description: Now, whether you are a curious healthcare professional or just a connoisseur of diet information, two New York Times best-selling authors provide you with the definitive resource for low carbohydrate living. Doctors Volek and Phinney share over 50 years of clinical experience using low carbohydrate diets, and together they have published more than 200 research papers and chapters on the topic. Particularly in the last decade, much has been learned about the risks associated with insulin resistance (including but not limited to metabolic syndrome, hypertension, and type-2 diabetes), and how this condition is far better controlled by carbohydrate restriction than with drugs.
These are sirloin rolls have brussel sprouts and fennel as sidekicks, but the sirloin is going to get top billing as the star of the show. Making sirloin rolls can be tricky unless you know how to do it, and they’ve provided helpful instructions here so yours will come out looking just like theirs. They have bacon rolled up with the sirloin, so you’re going to get plenty of flavor, and it’s nice that they have matched all of this meat with Brussels sprouts, one of the healthiest vegetables around.

Perhaps you know this by the French name mille-feuille, but it also goes by Napoleon. Following a traditional mille-feuille recipe will get you into trouble on Paleo because of all the puff pastry and pastry cream that is used. Here they’ve made a faux version, and they’ve made it Paleo friendly so you won’t have to feel bad about eating it. The puff pastry has been replaced with almond flour, so no concerns about wheat or grains, and the filling is made with no dairy, using only ingredients commonly found in Paleo cooking and baking recipes.
Sweet potatoes will likely become one of the foods you find yourself using a lot of when eating Paleo. That’s because they can be cooked up in so many different ways, and they also serve as a great replacement to white potatoes. In this soup they’ll add a creamy texture, as well as lots of flavor. They go great with bell peppers, and their choice of lemon and thyme can’t be beat. The great part is that they used leftover mashed sweet potatoes for this soup, which takes out a lot of the prep work and lets you get to the cooking and the eating faster.
These are sirloin rolls have brussel sprouts and fennel as sidekicks, but the sirloin is going to get top billing as the star of the show. Making sirloin rolls can be tricky unless you know how to do it, and they’ve provided helpful instructions here so yours will come out looking just like theirs. They have bacon rolled up with the sirloin, so you’re going to get plenty of flavor, and it’s nice that they have matched all of this meat with Brussels sprouts, one of the healthiest vegetables around.
Two teaspoons of smoked paprika may seem like a lot, but it will help to form a nice crust on the pork as it sears in the pan. You can also sub 1 teaspoon ground cumin plus 1 teaspoon chipotle chile powder. A hot oven will help the sweet potato wedges crisp up on the outside without burning. Remove the pork from the oven just as it reaches 140. The temp will climb to an ideal 145, and the meat will be just right. This is paleo version of one of our favorite weeknight dinners.

For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.

Why not take a load off and plan your next Monday through Friday with some of these Paleo dinners you can make in a single pot? Whether it’s a skillet, a Dutch oven, a roasting pan, or a wok, all you need to do is throw in the ingredients and let heat do the rest. You’ll have more time to take a walk, hit the gym, or even just sit outside now that the sunlight is lingering!
Two teaspoons of smoked paprika may seem like a lot, but it will help to form a nice crust on the pork as it sears in the pan. You can also sub 1 teaspoon ground cumin plus 1 teaspoon chipotle chile powder. A hot oven will help the sweet potato wedges crisp up on the outside without burning. Remove the pork from the oven just as it reaches 140. The temp will climb to an ideal 145, and the meat will be just right. This is paleo version of one of our favorite weeknight dinners.
Stuffed burgers are all the rage, and you can get into the craze with the Paleo diet, you just have to stuff the burger with Paleo friendly foods. In this recipe they’ve used an avocado as the stuffing, which gives these burgers potassium and healthy fat they wouldn’t otherwise have. They are grass-fed ground beef for the burger meat, which you’ll want to get into the habit of buying since it is closer to the natural way cows would eat. They’ve also managed to sneak in some sun-dried tomatoes, so you’ll be getting additional nutrition from those.
The chicken. The green sauce. The homemade sriracha. Some of Michelle Tam's recipes are a little more difficult than I like to attempt during a Whole30 (I prefer to keep it simple), but others are in heavy rotation (especially the green chicken and the Peruvian chicken). The Nom Nom app is amazing too — totally worth the price. You can also pre-order Michelle's next book, Ready or Not!, which is coming out in August 2017. Buy it here.
I had planned on photographing a bunch of the recipes myself, but there's been little time since we moved plus the food goes too fast around here! So here are some of my favorite recipes in the book, using George's photos. Everything we've ever tried from the Civilized Caveman has been incredible and this book is no different. My Eggs Benedict over Savory Waffles is also included in the book so make sure to look for it! You'll also get a bonus package of all of his best pumpkin recipes for Halloween and Thanksgiving. Plus he backs your purchase with a 60-day money back guarantee in case you're not satisfied. You never find that in the ebook world and I think that's incredibly generous!

These stuffed peppers are using sweet peppers so they are not spicy, and they are stuffed with goat cheese, which does not contain as much lactose as cheese made from cow’s milk. They say that you can use a different cheese if you do not like goat cheese, and with the cheese question you’re going to have to come up with your own answer as to which kind you are going to use while you are eating Paleo. If your body responds well to eating cheese, you’ll be able to have it more often than someone that can’t process it.
The idea behind this cookbook is interesting. Basically, the author is relying on 15 key ingredients. With these, she offers 150 different recipes and a total of 450 variations. Now, this doesn’t mean that the book only uses 15 ingredients. Instead, those ingredients act as bases for the recipes and are expanded upon. So, you will still need some other ingredients.
A chicken salad sandwich sounds great for lunch, but the sandwich part is out of the question if you’re eating paleo. This recipe for a healthy alternative adds a fiber boost in the form of diced vegetables, like radishes and cabbage. If you pack along four or five large butter lettuce leaves, you can leave your fork at home and scoop up the chicken with them.
Dyed clothes came into fashion in early Iron Age Legendary Viking town unearthed Organic tools found in Stone Age camp Stone Age cartoons We buy healthier food than in previous generations How agriculture came to Scandinavia Unique find at Viking burial place Immigration in the Viking era Vikings grew barley in Greenland Low carb diets rocked in the Stone Age Denmark’s past viewed from above
Even though these have been dubbed “finger lickin’” Colonel Sanders has nothing to do with these. That’s because they’re not made with chicken, but with beef. They pack a bit of a kick because of the chipotles used, but not so much that it overpowers the other ingredients. There are plenty of Paleo ingredients used, both in the meatballs, and in the sauce. You’ll find tasty items like coriander seed, garlic, paprika, and bay leaves. You’ll find that the Paleo diet is not very restrictive, it’s just a matter of finding the right mix of spices and seasonings to make the food taste as good as it can.
These recipes are created with ease in mind, as we’re often cooking for others and accommodating our busy schedules… but they also all taste amazing. These are the same recipes we take to barbecues and birthday parties to be enjoyed by several people with different tastes. You can be sure that you will enjoy cooking these recipes as much as you’ll enjoy eating them – and food is always better when shared!
5. Cassava Pizza Crust: Speaking of Italian comfort foods, you can still have pizza Fridays. This pizza crust is made of mashed cassava (also called yuca), which crisps up nicely (as our Caribbean friends who traditionally cook with yuca already know). Top it with your favorite veggies and nut cheese and you’re good to go. (via Predominantly Paleo)
Not surprisingly, Paleo for Beginners focuses on teaching people how to get started with a paleo diet. To do this, the author includes information about the diet itself and recommended foods, along with a transition plan, a shopping guide and, of course, the recipes themselves. The information provided isn’t as comprehensive as Practical Paleo, which was discussed earlier. Nevertheless, Paleo for Beginners does achieve its goal well and is effective if you want something a little more concise.
You don’t have to subject yourself to the Orange Chicken made by a fast food place anymore, you can stay on the Paleo path and still have a delicious orange chicken when you get the notion. that’s because it gets its sweetness from honey, and its orange flavor from oranges, so nothing artificial goes into it. The use of ginger, chili sauce, and garlic means you’ll still be getting the classic taste, but this method gives you control over the quality of ingredients you’re using, especially the chicken, which you can use organic free range chicken.
Kirsty, with animal protein I’m a pretty picky. I buy at butchers where I trust in the quality. In my opinion there is a huge difference in taste and quality when it comes to animal protein. Grains and veggies I’m more lenient but never with animal protein. The cheapest way to get high quality meat is share a whole animal with friends or neighbors. The bacon we eat is from a pig I share with another 2 families. Once a year I get 1/3 and freeze it all. The bacon is incomparable to any grocery store bacon. I’d rather it less often.
I don't know about you, but I rely on blogs and cookbooks for advice when I'm trying to cook healthier—in fact, this recipe a friend sent me for a Paleo breakfast casserole basically got me through my Whole 30 (I never even got sick of it). Having meal inspo at the ready is key to sticking to your goals, and we just so happen to have found the best Paleo cookbooks out there. In case you aren't familiar with the Paleo diet, people associate it with eating like a caveman—you basically consume a lot of protein, fresh veggies, and good fat while saying goodbye to processed foods and most sugars.

In many ways, the most interesting thing about this cookbook isn’t the recipes but the other information that is provided. With this cookbook, the authors strongly focus helping people to transition to the paleo diet and then stick with it in the long-term. This type of information can be particularly useful because the paleo diet is often overwhelming, especially when people first get involved.
This flatbread pizza is billed as being grain free and nut free, which is interesting because many Paleo pizza crusts will contain almond flour to replace ordinary flour. This recipe uses sunflower seed flour, a very unique choice for a white flour substitute, and it combines that with tapioca flour to live up to the nut-free promise. You are free to add your own toppings, or go with what they’ve used, including fresh tomatoes, spinach leaves, and season things up with oregano, basil, and garlic powder. It’s nice to have a guilt-free delicious flatbread crust recipe to have on-hand anytime you get a pizza craving.
This Crock Pot roast has everything you’d want from a traditional Sunday roast, all in one pot. The beauty of it is that everything comes out perfectly cooked so the meat is very tender and juicy and the carrots, celery, onions, and cauliflower all come out soft and ready to eat. A major bonus to this is just how easy it is to get everything prepared and put into the slow cooker. Most roasts will have you checking in on it from time to time, but this one let’s you relax for about 8 hours before you have to do anything else to it.
Jambalaya can be a very hard recipe to make, which is why it’s good that this uses the slow cooker because you can take out some of that complexity. It’s also a dish that lends itself nicely to Paleo eating because it includes plenty of different meats, as well as a good amount of vegetables. For example there is an entire head of cauliflower added to this, and it helps to balance out all of the sausage and chicken. They make it even easier by using premixed Cajun seasoning, but they also point out that you can use your own if you happen to have some already made.
Say hello to paleo and goodbye to stuffed sandwiches, right? Not so fast. Here’s an Italian roll-up with everything you love about a footlong. Vary the amount of greens in the middle of the roll as much as you like — the more you use, the more fiber. Substitute traditional mayo for the paleo-friendly version included in this recipe, or try pesto or hummus.

One-bowl meals are another lunch-friendly preparation that’s easily adaptable to paleo eating. This one calls itself a taco bowl, but the bowl is lettuce or other broadleaf greens instead of corn tortillas. In fact, all the vegetables in this recipe have healthy doses of vitamins C and A (a half-cup of raw spinach has 1,400 IUs of vitamin A). Vitamin C is sensitive to heat, so the C in this case comes from the fresh greens and the orange slices, rather than from the large serving of orange juice that cooks the meat.
This stew is made from a bunch of beef, some blueberries, carrots, and an onion. It may sound like a bit of an odd mix, but trust us, it works. A stew is the perfect platform to construct a great Paleo meal, and here there’s plenty of healthy foods being combined. You’ll get plenty of protein from all of that beef, as well as important minerals like iron. Blueberries consistently make the news because of their antioxidant value, and carrots have long been known to be healthy due to the beta Carotene they contain. Onions also add to the nutritional value of this meal, and it will definitely keep you satisfied for several hours.
If you’re looking for a beef Paleo dish that comes out looking fantastic, like something you’d want to serve company, you’ll want to go with this braised bottom round roast. It is made with a whopping 3 pounds of grass fed beef bottom round, and has plenty of sweet potatoes, so you’ll be getting the fiber needed to help all of that meat make it through your system. An onion is added for good measure, and there are plenty of sage leaves used for flavor. She’s also using plenty of garlic, so you know that this roast will be noticeable on your palate.
The books I've supplied for you here are excellent resources to get you started, and you can do a quick Google search online for even more info about the diet itself if you'd like. I congratulate any person who is making or has already made the switch to a happier and healthier life, and I welcome you to the clean life. Living Paleo is living better, and that's all there is to it!
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
Eggs are an excellent foundation for paleo breakfasts. Over easy, scrambled, poached, baked, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, made into an omelet—you name it. You can also experiment with paleo pancakes, using protein powder, coconut flour, or almond flour in lieu of white flour (tip: add baking soda and vinegar for a fluffier outcome). Chia puddings, sweet potato "toast," and paleo-friendly smoothies are also fair game.
This chorizo chili is made in the Crock Pot so it’s going to come out perfectly cooked without much attention from you. It uses a combination of grass fed beef, as well as chorizo sausage which gives it plenty of spice, which is good if you like your chili spicy. Not to worry, there are other spices and seasonings used to kick up the heat, so you can adjust it according to your own taste. For example there are Ro-Tel tomatoes, which carry their own spiciness, so you may want to opt out of those and just use regular tomatoes instead. There’s also cumin, as well as chipotle peppers, just add more or less as desired.
This is where it all begins. Well, for me it was actually Melissa and Dallas Hartwig's first book, It Starts With Food, but that's more of a nutrition book than a cookbook so it's not on this list. The Whole30 book is an upgrade from that, with even better meal planning and cooking resources. No doubt that the official Whole30 Cookbook, which was released in 2016, is also a good one to keep in your kitchen. I'd like to get my hands on that one soon. Buy it here.
However, what sets this book apart is its deep dive into the health benefits of paleo eating. There are meal plans specifically designed to address health problems like hormone imbalances or adrenal problems, as well as in-depth explanations of how food can impact your health. Some reviewers say the health information can get a little confusing, but most agree that it’s extremely helpful for understanding the benefits of paleo eating.
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