When you only want dessert for one a cake is too much, which is why Kiri came up with a way to make a chocolate cake in a mug, using only Paleo ingredients. This comes out moist and fluffy, just like you’d expect from a cake. The other thing you’ll really love about this is she’s whittled it down to the fastest and easiest steps possible. You just toss all of the ingredients in to a mug, mix, microwave, and enjoy. This goes great with a Paleo ice cream, so it’s true that you can really have your Paleo cake and eat it too, without feeling lousy or regretful afterward.
This chorizo chili is made in the Crock Pot so it’s going to come out perfectly cooked without much attention from you. It uses a combination of grass fed beef, as well as chorizo sausage which gives it plenty of spice, which is good if you like your chili spicy. Not to worry, there are other spices and seasonings used to kick up the heat, so you can adjust it according to your own taste. For example there are Ro-Tel tomatoes, which carry their own spiciness, so you may want to opt out of those and just use regular tomatoes instead. There’s also cumin, as well as chipotle peppers, just add more or less as desired.
Not paleo specifically, but this gorgeously designed book is full of plant-forward recipes that are either Whole30-compliant already or require a little bit of adaptation to fit into the plan. At any rate, I always welcome extra inspiration when it comes to vegetables, so I love paging through this one. The photography and design is really stunning and makes me want to eat zucchini ribbons all day. Buy it here.
Mussels are rarely what comes to mind when it comes to a quick, simple and cheap meal, but I think it’s a mistake. When fresh and in season, mussels are usually pretty cheap and they are so quick to prepare that you won’t believe dinner can be ready in such a short time. It’s also a great occasion to eat seafood, something we tend to forget as an important part of a Paleo diet. Nutrition and taste wise, mussels are amazing. They are packed full of iron, selenium, vitamin B12, manganese and a host of other essential nutrients. The steam from the white wine and garlic sauce is what cooks the mussels here. The butter in the sauce adds richness and flavor. This kind of preparation is called moules marinières in France, where the dish comes from. Another classic sauce for mussels is a tomato marinara sauce. About a pound of mussels is about what’s needed per person. This recipe is for 4 people.
This dish shows you how to cook up a simple, yet delicious Paleo stir fry that has only a few main ingredients, but is not short on flavor. It has bell peppers, chicken, some soy sauce, chili powder, and is fried up in coconut oil, so while it may seem like a basic recipe, it actually is full of flavor. This makes a great meal to cook up whenever you need a quick dinner, or lunch and want to keep things light. It is easily adaptable as well, you can use any vegetables you happen to have on hand in order to complete it or build on it.
What I love the most about this cookbook is that it is different. Most paleo cookbooks tend to follow the same general patterns and styles, often resulting in dishes that are fairly similar to one another. But, that’s not the case here. Instead, the recipes take their inspiration from southern cooking and give you the chance to still enjoy those flavors and styles of meals.

Against All Grain is one of the most popular series for paleo cooking out there and this book is one interesting entry. The idea with this particular book is easy meals that can be made for dinners throughout the week. The cookbook also includes tips and tricks about getting the best outcomes, along with shopping lists to help people plan effectively. The cookbook is also visually stunning, with many photos to inspire you.
Crackling with humor and bursting with flavor, Nom Nom Paleo offers a fun, fresh approach to cooking with whole, unprocessed ingredients free of grains, legumes, and added sugar. New York Times bestselling authors Michelle Tam and Henry Fong have cooked up a visual feast with their debut cookbook, featuring more than 100 foolproof Paleo recipes and over 900 step-by-step photographs and cartoons. There’s something for everyone here, whether you’re a busy mom, a triathlete in training, or a lifelong foodie who’s curious about the “caveman” approach to eating.
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
Tender lamb combines with fresh veggies like kale and butternut squash to create the ultimate comforting winter stew. Richly spiced with coriander, cumin, and paprika, the secret ingredient is also a dash of cinnamon. The best part of this simple paleo recipe is that the majority of the cooking time is hands-off, leaving you time to focus on other things.
Not paleo specifically, but this gorgeously designed book is full of plant-forward recipes that are either Whole30-compliant already or require a little bit of adaptation to fit into the plan. At any rate, I always welcome extra inspiration when it comes to vegetables, so I love paging through this one. The photography and design is really stunning and makes me want to eat zucchini ribbons all day. Buy it here.
Making a pizza crust from cauliflower is something you just have to try if you haven’t yet. You’ll be surprised that a vegetable can double as a pizza crust, and even more surprised to learn that it actually tastes good. This pizza makes use of bacon, so it has an unfair advantage on your taste buds. There’s also spinach as a topping, so you’re definitely covered in the vegetable department. Coconut flour helps the cauliflower turn out like a pizza crust, so you won’t be focused on that while you’re eating and you can focus on the bacon.

The cooking methods, the kitchen equipment and the food culture in the illustrations are also based on archaeological finds. Even the clothes and the clay jars are finds from settlements or graves. The glass in the woman’s hand, for example, was found at an excavation site in Sweden. (Illustration: Communicating Culture & Atelier bunterhund Zürich)

Practical Paleo is more than just a recipe book. Instead, the book acts as a particularly effective introduction to the paleo diet, offering information and steps about what you can expect from the beginning all the way through. Some of this information may even be new to people who have been following paleo for a while, especially as there is a discussion about gut bacteria and various ways to live a paleo lifestyle effectively.
Anytime you keep things simple you’ll be keeping them Paleo. Think about it: early man didn’t complicate things because they couldn’t complicate things. They had to use what was around them, whatever that would have been. They also didn’t have well-equipped kitchens like we have, so their cooking style would have been rudimentary, yet effective. This tomato soup only adds a few different items plus some seasonings to fresh, ripe tomatoes so it’s going to really pop in your mouth, and the tomato flavor will be front and center. Luckily we have things like immersion blenders to make quick work of the preparation process.
I'm a guy, carnivore and amateur cook . I love meat so going Paleo isn't a great stretch for me, but I'm always looking for ways to bump up the flavor and elevate my cooking. What I like about this cookbook is that the recipes are easy to follow. But what I LOVE is the diversity of different cooking styles and meats used. The author takes you on a world wide trip of flavor and introduces you to proteins most people would be nervous to try to cook or eat. While you have your normal proteins such as beef, pork, chicken and lamb, you also get an intro to frog legs, gator, bison, buffalo, venison, elk, etc. Take a walk on the wide side and let your inner Captain Caveman taste buds scream in joy with these tasty and healthy recipes. Good Eats.
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
Not surprisingly, Paleo for Beginners focuses on teaching people how to get started with a paleo diet. To do this, the author includes information about the diet itself and recommended foods, along with a transition plan, a shopping guide and, of course, the recipes themselves. The information provided isn’t as comprehensive as Practical Paleo, which was discussed earlier. Nevertheless, Paleo for Beginners does achieve its goal well and is effective if you want something a little more concise.
Against All Grain - Danielle Walker is the author of this New York Times Bestseller. She has battled autoimmune disease for a very long time using modern-day medicine. This is when she decided to take matters on her own hand by allowing food to be her medicine. She has mastered grain-free, gluten-free and dairy-free cooking which has allowed here to eliminate her ailments. 
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