One thing to mention is that the book does focus almost entirely on kid-type foods. This includes some meals and many finger foods. For many families, these probably wouldn’t be dishes that would serve the adults as well. Now, that may not be an issue. But, for people who want to cook a single meal for everybody or who are looking for kid-friendly dinners, the book may not be quite right.
For some reason, putting things into burger form makes them taste better. These apple-basil chicken burgers are made with boneless chicken thighs, eggs, garlic powder and chili powder, as well as red bell peppers and apple. All of the ingredients get mixed in with each other, and formed into patties. They show this being served with broccoli and pumpkin, showcasing the way a Paleo meal should book. And of course there’s no bun on this burger because bread isn’t part of the Paleo way of eating. Trust us, when you’re done eating all those vegetables you won’t be missing the bun.
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While paleo's most vocal advocates include committed athletes and fitness-first type of people, that doesn't mean that the benefits of eating paleo are limited to hardcore workout junkies. Paleo is great for anyone who wants pretty simple guidelines and feels their best on a diet rich in protein, fat, and greens. We always recommend eating the way that works best for you; there is no one-size-fits-all approach. Paleo is a great way to dip into clean eating, and with some trial and error you should be able to decide if it's an approach that works for you.


You’ll be happy to learn that you can have Thai curry on the Paleo diet, as long as you follow a recipe that’s been adjusted accordingly. This may not follow the traditional recipe exactly, but all of the distinct flavors are there, thanks to the use of full-fat coconut milk. They’ve used plenty of chicken, and have included an assortment of vegetables like zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, and asparagus. There’s even kale thrown in for even more nutrients. Really as long as you’ve got the curry paste and the coconut milk you’re well on your way to a successful replication.

Brandi currently lives in Kansas City, Missouri and is a self-taught cook and fitness enthusiast. She has focused on healthy recipe development and exercise for 5+ years after reaching a fitness plateau and struggling to lose weight and maintain body goals. Brandi’s goal is to share recipes and workouts that support a consistently healthy lifestyle.


Here’s another paleo recipe that’s easy to put in a single-serving container and bring along for lunch. This slow-cooker preparation means you can pull everything together on a Sunday night and walk out the door with minimal lunch prep on Monday morning. Just throw some salad ingredients together and top it with your cooked barbacoa. You already know beef is a good source of protein; it also provides iron, zinc, and B vitamins.
If you love the taste of curry but don’t know how to make it, this soup can serve as a reliable way to get that flavor without having to memorize a difficult recipe or use curry from a jar. There are plenty of ingredients being used here, but you’ll see in the directions that it’s just a matter of combining them all together, so it’s not complicated. You end up with an amazing curry soup that has interesting things like almonds in it to give it a crunch you don’t usually get with curry. They’re also giving it healthy fat and additional protein which is very helpful.

Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.


Against All Grain - Danielle Walker is the author of this New York Times Bestseller. She has battled autoimmune disease for a very long time using modern-day medicine. This is when she decided to take matters on her own hand by allowing food to be her medicine. She has mastered grain-free, gluten-free and dairy-free cooking which has allowed here to eliminate her ailments. 
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