In many ways, the most interesting thing about this cookbook isn’t the recipes but the other information that is provided. With this cookbook, the authors strongly focus helping people to transition to the paleo diet and then stick with it in the long-term. This type of information can be particularly useful because the paleo diet is often overwhelming, especially when people first get involved.

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These berries are wrapped in prosciutto and stuffed with a blend of cheese and greens. They make for a fun snack, and are also great for entertaining. If you’ve been worried that you can’t host a party or serve guests Paleo foods, there’s no need to worry. Many of the dishes that you make will not look any different than “normal” food, and if you don’t want to tell anyone it’s Paleo friendly, you don’t have to. In this recipe they’re using ricotta, but they are making sure it’s grass-fed. If you are unable to process any sort of dairy you’ll want to omit this part, but many Paleo followers allow a bit of high quality cheese now and then.
This salsa chicken is advertised as being very simple, which will help you whip it up and get it in the crockpot quickly so you can get on with your day. Imagine getting this ready in the morning in just a few minutes, and coming home at the end of the day to a fully cooked meal ready to be eaten. That’s the concept here and she pulls it off nicely with organic salsa, chicken breast, a bit of chili powder, and an onion. We recommend you don’t serve this with a side salad to help make it a complete meal, as it’s a bit light on the vegetables.
The mild flavor of spinach makes it wonderfully adaptable to sizzling garlic and spice from the crushed red pepper. For fullest flavor, cook spinach only until it begins to turn limp. Sautéed spinach can be made in a snap and pairs perfectly with almost every protein. If you have leftover spinach on hand or any wilting leafy greens, sautéing with a little olive oil and garlic instantly brings it back to life. Starting aromatics in a cold skillet lets them infuse the oil. The garlic also has less chance of burning. Let cooked potatoes dry out so they'll be extra crispy in the hash. Leftover cooked potatoes would be even better. Ground chicken has a touch more fat than ground chicken breast, key for more flavorful hash. Serve with Sautéed Spinach with Garlic and Red Pepper.

These berries are wrapped in prosciutto and stuffed with a blend of cheese and greens. They make for a fun snack, and are also great for entertaining. If you’ve been worried that you can’t host a party or serve guests Paleo foods, there’s no need to worry. Many of the dishes that you make will not look any different than “normal” food, and if you don’t want to tell anyone it’s Paleo friendly, you don’t have to. In this recipe they’re using ricotta, but they are making sure it’s grass-fed. If you are unable to process any sort of dairy you’ll want to omit this part, but many Paleo followers allow a bit of high quality cheese now and then.


You don’t have to subject yourself to the Orange Chicken made by a fast food place anymore, you can stay on the Paleo path and still have a delicious orange chicken when you get the notion. that’s because it gets its sweetness from honey, and its orange flavor from oranges, so nothing artificial goes into it. The use of ginger, chili sauce, and garlic means you’ll still be getting the classic taste, but this method gives you control over the quality of ingredients you’re using, especially the chicken, which you can use organic free range chicken.
Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
Shakshuka, a traditional Israeli breakfast food, is a skillet of spiced tomatoes, peppers, and onions with baked eggs. In this version, we swapped out our trusted cast-iron skillet for the walls of a spaghetti squash boat to create a paleo-friendly morning meal. Spaghetti squash adds a creamy texture and sweet flavor to this low-carb spin on a breakfast hash. Sprinkled with fresh cilantro, this hearty breakfast option is perfect for a brunch crowd or a lazy weekend morning in bed.
Is this book 100% squeaky-clean strict Paleo? No. Ultra-strict Paleo templates call for avoidance of salt, extreme reduction in carbohydrate intake, and never eating dairy of any kind. When performance-minded people blindly follow strict Paleo, the rate of failure and abandonment is high. Why? They haven’t properly tailored Paleo principles to their training demands. As such, you’ll see salt, carb-dense veggies and even some full-fat dairy like ghee in some recipes. And, you’ll even see the occasional option for things like whey protein, white potatoes and white rice. These may not be right for every person, but it’s my stance that if these foods are not problematic for you and may help your performance and recovery, they shouldn’t be 100% off the menu forever.

The Big Book of Paleo Slow Cooking: 200 Nourishing Recipes That Cook Carefree, for Everyday Dinners and Weekend Feasts contains a variety of recipes—everything from quick, easy weeknight meals to more complicated dishes to prepare on weekends or holidays. The meals incorporate international flavors, all while using common ingredients. There’s also a pantry stocking section that will help you stock up on paleo-approved ingredients.

Fajitas are a classic in Tex-Mex cuisine and are adored universally by kids and adults alike. The classic fajita calls for skirt steak and is served with a choice of toppings over corn or wheat flour tortilla, but this Paleo take on the classic fajita meal is just as delicious without the tortilla. Today, fajitas are also commonly prepared with pork, chicken or shrimp and the usual vegetables include bell peppers and onions. Enjoy making a big batch and pleasing the whole family with this classic do-it-yourself dinner. This recipe serves about 5 people, but be sure to make more for leftovers.
You’d think vegan and paleo sort of cancel each other out, with paleo diet recipes emphasizing grass-fed meats and free-range eggs and vegans avoiding all animal products. But when you think about what our “ancestors” probably really ate, it must have been a very plant-based diet. So, what does an ancestral vegan diet look like? Abundant fruits and veggies are something both eating philosophies have in common. Grains and legumes — go-tos for many vegans — are out, but paleo-friendly starches like sweet potatoes, yams, cassava and plantains are in, and they’re both tasty and filling. So are all the good fats, like nuts, avocados and olive oil. And we can sweeten things up when we need to with fruit juices, honey, molasses, pure maple syrup and dried fruits. This is starting to sound not only healthy, but also deliciously doable. Here are 18 tempting recipes that’ll have you saying: “Let’s do this!”
Turmeric is known for its powerful anti-inflammatory properties and has been used for a long time in cooking and medicine in India. This PBS post goes into much about the history and benefits of turmeric. Dr. Axe also has a great post about how turmeric can be medicinally better than some drugs on the market. Check it out here. I’m sure that by now you’ve heard that turmeric is good for you and your body and it is great to introduce it into your everyday cooking. It is easy to add it to roasted veggies, smoothies, and also teas. Check out our turmeric maple roasted beets and carrots for another recipe idea!
I’ve been an athlete since about age 8, and competing—whether it’s with myself or against a field of others—has always been part of my identity. When I found Paleo in 2009, my health and performance improved dramatically. At the time, I was racing mountain bikes and doing triathlons. Then, I became a competitive CrossFitter, most notably participating at the 2013 SoCal Regionals with Team Sea of Green.

There's no one "right way" to do paleo. If you're just starting out, it may take some time to figure out what feels best. Maybe you just eat paleo after 2 p.m. on weekdays; maybe you are so hardcore, you get uneasy just looking at a slice of bread. Most of us fall somewhere in between. We're advocates of a more generally "paleo-based" system, following paleo principles most of the time, but making reasonable exceptions for important events or your mom's famous chocolate chip cookies.


The one thing to note is that the complexity of the recipes is somewhat divisive. Some people feel that the recipes are simple and easy to follow, while others find them overly complicated. As is often the case, reality is somewhere in the middle. By paleo standards, the recipes aren’t too bad, especially given you need a good balance of macros to maximize performance. Nevertheless, if you are new to paleo, the recipes may seem a little confusing at first, although you would get used to them.
The dressing steals the show on this salad, but you don’t want to overlook the roasted pumpkin. Pumpkin is an often overlooked vegetable that only gets popular in the fall, but is full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber that makes it a healthy part of any meal all year long. Roasting it softens it up properly so it is pleasing to the tooth, and the dressing that accompanies it on this recipe is pretty special. The peculiar thing is that it’s very simple, consisting of just five ingredients: olive oil, orange juice, herbs, and salt and pepper. Be sure to use sea salt and not refined salt.

Against All Grain - Danielle Walker is the author of this New York Times Bestseller. She has battled autoimmune disease for a very long time using modern-day medicine. This is when she decided to take matters on her own hand by allowing food to be her medicine. She has mastered grain-free, gluten-free and dairy-free cooking which has allowed here to eliminate her ailments. 

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