Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.
Tender lamb combines with fresh veggies like kale and butternut squash to create the ultimate comforting winter stew. Richly spiced with coriander, cumin, and paprika, the secret ingredient is also a dash of cinnamon. The best part of this simple paleo recipe is that the majority of the cooking time is hands-off, leaving you time to focus on other things.
In order to keep salads interesting you need to have an array of different ways to make them. In this grilled chicken salad recipe you’re starting with a basic chicken salad, but adding in items like raspberries, walnuts, and artichoke hearts to jazz things up and make it a meal that you look forward to time and time again. Top it with a basic balsamic vinaigrette or your favorite Paleo dressing and you’ve got a winner on your hands.
Salmon tastes great and it is one of the top recommended foods you can eat while following the Paleo diet. This is because it is loaded with plenty of omega 3’s, as well as healthy fats that your body needs to function at its best. In this recipe she has made things very simple, which only serves to bring out the natural flavor of the salmon. She has it topped with slices of lemon, and also capers are used for subtle flavoring. All that’s needed is a vegetable dish to go with it to make it just right so you don’t get the munchies late at night before bedtime.

Grandmas may have spent hours perfecting their versions of meatballs (and we love 'em for it!), but in these busy times, slaving over a stove may not be on the agenda. Expedite your meatball-making with these breadcrumb-free, baked-not-fried pork and beef spheres, drowned in a homemade marinara sauce. You won’t believe it only takes about 30 minutes for the whole thing to come together.
Cajun seasoning is always going to do a great job of adding spice and some heat to a meal, and in this recipe they provide you with the steps to make your own Cajun seasoning mix from scratch. Be sure to make a big batch of it so you can store it and have it on hand for more Cajun style cooking in the future. Once you have the Cajun burgers in place it’s time to top them off with some caramelized onions. This is served up without a bun, and on a bed of creamed spinach, and she provides a nice creamed spinach recipe that doesn’t use any dairy, but uses coconut milk instead.
Usually spaghetti and meatballs is something that you would have to forgo when you eat the Paleo way. That’s because noodles just aren’t something you can eat, at least the traditional type. This spaghetti and meatballs recipe makes some key changes so that you can enjoy this classic dish without worrying about eating wheat or grains. The spaghetti is made from squash so it is not real spaghetti at all, and may taste a little different, but should give you the overall feel of spaghetti and meatballs. If you can get used to these small changes it will make a big difference on your waistline.
This mackerel recipe uses a pound of fresh mackerel with the skin left on. It is advertised as being served with a magic sauce and without taking any of the magic away we can tell you that it’s made with sherry, honey, some vinegar, and fresh ginger so it’s going to taste incredible, without using any ingredients that will set you back on your progress. On Paleo you may see yourself eating more fish than you used to eat, because it is such a healthy meat, and something our ancestors surely would have eaten. They have it served on a bed of cauli-rice, a rice substitute made from cauliflower.
These teriyaki kabobs give you the flavor of teriyaki chicken that you might get from a Japanese restaurant, but in kebab form so they are grilled and have a very distinctive flavor. You’ll notice the attention to detail, like using organic wheat free soy sauce in order to make them. They also recommend using raw organic honey, which will replace the sugar typically found in a teriyaki sauce recipe. There is also fresh ginger used, and garlic, and they recommend free range organic chicken breasts, which should become your new way of buying chicken when on the Paleo diet.
Kelly is such a talented photographer. Her book makes me want to eat the food right off the page. Equally as good as the photography are her recipes. Kelly incorporates chocolate into each recipe so thoughtfully that we cooked from it all week and didn’t feel chocolated-out! The book is packed with delicious recipes for treats, but it also has a handful of savory recipes with a chocolate twist. If you enjoy chocolate even half as much as I do, then this book is a must-have!

Get real energy from natural sources with these coconut almond energy bars. Forget energy drinks or energy bars sold in stores. That’s all phoney baloney parlor tricks that make your heart race a little faster so you think you have more energy. But what happens later is you crash and have even less energy than when you started. These bars are filled with almonds and other wholesome foods, taste amazing, and give you that get up and go you need during the day.
Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.
These breakfast cups use two primary ingredients that are Paleo friendly: ham and eggs. They make a cup out of the ham so that the egg can rest inside of it. This means you are not getting any additional ingredients to muck things up, and they have kept it very simple. In fact there are only two other ingredients, and one of those is optional. You just add a bit of green onion, and if you feel like it you can put a bit of cheese on. They are using nitrate free ham, so you can tell that there is plenty of attention being given to using quality ingredients.
I went on Saturday morning and I excitedly told the young girl about finding your blog. The owner was out at the farmers market. I got the chicken salad wrap….delish! I purchases the paleo wraps and can’t wait to make my own this week. I am new paleo….I’ve tried many ways of eating…from raw to lord knows what. I’m 56 in pretty good health but have a bad hip. I need to loose about 20 pounds and want to do it healthfully and have the weight stay off and this be a lifestyle. I’ll be following your blog and maybe I’ll see you at Vive!
Bring pizza back on the menu with this recipe that could win an award. It’s made with rhubarb, which if you’re like us you didn’t know much about it before going Paleo. But it’s a very useful item to have around, and it’s used in plenty of recipes. Here they’ve paired it with chipotle powder so you’re going to get a pizza topped with ingredients you probably wouldn’t have considered before. They use goat cheese, which helps to avoid the use of cheese made from cow’s milk, and this is something you may or may not be able to digest well, so use your own judgement on it.
Making a pizza crust from cauliflower is something you just have to try if you haven’t yet. You’ll be surprised that a vegetable can double as a pizza crust, and even more surprised to learn that it actually tastes good. This pizza makes use of bacon, so it has an unfair advantage on your taste buds. There’s also spinach as a topping, so you’re definitely covered in the vegetable department. Coconut flour helps the cauliflower turn out like a pizza crust, so you won’t be focused on that while you’re eating and you can focus on the bacon.

Steak-centric salads are a staple of the American gastropub menu. Unfortunately, the “salad” interpretation is a bit loose—the lettuce merely a bed for a Flinstone-sized protein serving, the butter-yellow croutons, tons of cheese, and creamy dressing blanketing all. We kept the chargrilled steak then topped it off with good-for-you avocado and a vinaigrette that complements the vegetables rather than disguise them. This changes not only make it healthier, but it keeps the whole dish paleo-friendly. A little meat goes a long way: just 12 ounces is plenty to serve 4.


This sundae is trying to replicate the joy experienced from eating an Almond Joy, without including all of the ingredients they contain that aren’t good for you. Imagine, a guilt-free ice cream treat, that’s what she’s going for here. The chocolate being used is dark chocolate, so already you’re doing better than if you were using milk chocolate. The coconut of course comes from real coconut, but it’s unsweetened coconut flakes so you’re not getting refined sugar, as the sweetness in this sweet treat comes from honey. The almonds add healthy fat and are an essential part of this Almond Joy sundae.

Eating Paleo is as hard or easy as having the right recipes to follow. Go into it alone and try to figure it out solo, and you’ll probably crash and burn. Go into it armed with an arsenal of delicious recipes already planned out for you, and in accordance with the Paleo guidelines of what to eat and what not to eat, and your chances of success improve dramatically. Here are the Top 10 Paleo Diet Cookbooks on the planet, so you can get the junk out of your life and start eating real, actual, food.
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